Ford: Information we need (READ ME)

Introduction

We probably get 20 emails a week of the form:

“Dear Moates,

My name is ________ and I have a _________ Ford.  Can I use your products to tune my car/truck/van/etc. ?”

Identifying J3 Port ECMs

Our Ford products (F3 chip module, Quarterhorse) will work on pretty much any ECM that has a J3 port.  This is 95% of 87-2004 vehicles.  Most ECMs have a black plastic protective cover over the J3 port.  The picture below shows what a J3 port looks like with the protective cover removed:

Ford J3 Port, protective cover removed.

Again, our hardware products will work on any 1, 2, or 4 bank EECIV or EECV ECM that has a J3 port.

Software Support

I bet you thought that was too easy!  It is…

Our HARDWARE works on just about everything Ford ever made with a J3 port,

***BUT software support for Fords is not as guaranteed***

There are three applications that are known to work well with our hardware – TunerPro, EEC Editor and Binary Editor.  Each application supports different vehicles.  Some vehicles are supported by all three, some vehicles are supported by only one, some vehicles are supported by NONE.

We need to know some information about your ECM in order to be able to tell whether there is support for your vehicle.  This information is the “Strategy” (or “operating system”) that your ECM uses, which can usually be determined from the “Box code.”  Your “box code” can normally be found in the center of the label with the barcode where the wire harness connects to the ECM.  See picture below.

Z2D1 box code on label of ECM

Once you have found your box code, you can take a look at the box code-strategy cross reference to determine which strategy your ECM uses.  The list of supported strategies will then tell you which (if any) software supports your ECM.  If you can’t find your ECM, please email support@moates.net and remember when you contact us inquiring about vehicle support, please include the “box code” pictured above!  Without this information, we cannot provide you with accurate information about software support.


Ford Tuning: Getting Started with Moates Hardware

Chapter 1: Introduction, Overview and Summary

Questions you may have coming in:

  • How do I determine what is needed? Keep reading!
  • What vehicles are compatible? Hardware will work with all 2004 and older Ford vehicles with a J3 port, depending on software support.
  • What are the capabilities of Moates hardware? Realtime tuning, logging live data, burning chips, switching between multiple programs
  • What hardware and software options are available, and at what cost? Keep reading!
  • How do I learn to tune EEC? What learning resources are available? Keep reading!  We’ll provide references.

Vehicle Compatibility

  • Hardware is compatible with all year/model Ford vehicles that have a J3 port.  This generally covers 86-2004 model years.
  • If you already have a binary file (bin) or hex file (hex) that is tuned for your vehicle. you can use one of our chips.
  • If you need to make changes (tune) to get your vehicle where you want it, you are limited by software support.
  • Some ECMs are simply not supported in software that works with our hardware because of lack of definition information.
  • It’s important to check for software support before purchase. If you have an uncommon vehicle (for example, a 1995 Festiva) you may be out of luck with our products.
  • We need certain information to tell if your vehicle is supported. (clickEmail us to check before purchase!

Overview of Tuning Process

  • Determine your target vehicle boxcode and strategy.
    • The Boxcode is typically a 3 or 4-digit letter/number code on the EEC computer. ( ‘A9L’  or ‘T4M0′ for example)  This represents a calibration for a particular engine/transmission using a particular strategy.
    • A Strategy is the set of procedures that the ECM follows to run an engine.  Combined with a calbration, this determines how the engine will operate.
      • The strategy will determine things like whether a MAF or MAP sensor is used, how spark and fuel are calculated, how idle is controlled, etc.
      • Each strategy needs a definition (or ‘def’) to work.  The definition tells the software how to interpret the binary and display it in a format you can understand with tables and real-world values.
      • For instance, the A9L boxcode, belongs to the GUFB strategy.  The A3M boxcode also belongs to the GUFB strategy.  You can change a bunch of parameters on a A3M computer and have it run 100% identical to a A9L computer.
  • Review your software options in terms of availability.
    • First: figure out which software supports your box code.  Support varies from package to package.  Check with each software vendor for the most up-to-date supported options.
    • Next: download software and install it.  You can check out the interface and features at this time without paying for anything.
    • Finally: After you have found a software package with an interface that you like which supports your strategy, go to our web store to purchase.  You will need to have already installed software prior to purchasing in order to provide us with information to license it.
  • Determine your tuning needs to guide your purchases.
    • Do you just need to burn chips?
    • Do you want to be able to make changes while the vehicle is running? (emulation)
    • Do you want to be able to log vehicle parameters while the engine is running? (datalogging)
    • Do you want a more accurate measure of the air/fuel mixture? (buy a wideband)
    • Decide what capabilities you need and then purchase hardware as appropriate.
  • Install hardware.
    • Clean that J3 port PROPERLY!
    • To clean the J3 port, you generally must remove the case from the ECM, gently rub the J3 port with Scotchbrite or a mildly abrasive kitchen scrubber.  (‘mildly’ is important – you do NOT want to rub hard enough to remove the copper traces from the circuit board!)  A final clean with brake clean, starting fluid  or another mild solvent doesn’t hurt.  A properly cleaned J3 port will have a very, very slight crosshatch visible on the ‘fingers’ of the connector.
    • Golden rule: ALWAYS TAKE THE KEYS OUT OF THE IGNITION (CAR OFF!!!)  WHEN INSERTING OR REMOVING THINGS ON THE J3 PORT. Failure to do so can result in a fried ECM, fried chip/QuarterHorse or both.
  • Install USB drivers
    • The same USB drivers are used for all Ford products
    • USB driver is a free download from the webstore, it comes with config instructions. (download)
    • If you need more visual directions, there is an install guide available on the Moates support site.
    • If you have trouble with the install, there is troubleshooting guide available on the Moates support site.
  • Setup software and perform initial configuration
    • Establish communications, check settings – this procedure will vary depending on software package you are using.
    • Select the appropriate strategy for your box code and load any appropriate definition files.
    • Program hardware with a calibration to serve as a starting point.  A stock tune with a few key parameters modified to suit the vehicle at hand is great.  You’re just looking for something good enough to get the car to fire and (hopefully) idle.
    • If you are datalogging, select and configure datalogging payload matrix (PIDs) – i.e. what you’re interested in monitoring.
  • Gather performance data, analyze it, and make changes toward an optimized result.
    • Parameters are gradually adjusted to achieve desired targets.
    • This is an iterative process, where adjustments are made and the results are evaluated followed by further adjustments.
    • Please see our subsequent chapters on Ford Tuning (available separately).
      • Basic Tuning Techniques and Common Examples
      • Advanced Tuning and Tricky Combinations

Chapter 2: Hardware Selection and Installation

Several types of hardware are available and needed depending on desired functionality.

Laptop PC

  • Windows XP/Vista/7 are all compatible with the Ford tuning software.
  • Something 5 years old or newer is recommended (no old 486 machines!).
  • Internet access is recommended to facilitate licensing and software installations.
  • USB ports (at least 1) are required. All needed cables are included with the hardware.
  • If logging wideband, a serial-to-USB converter may be needed. ($37 on our webstore – link)

F3 Chip modules

  • These modules install onto the J3 port of the EEC box.
  • One per vehicle, $60 per unit – link.
  • J3 port MUST be thoroughly cleaned, both sides, before installation!
    • Disassemble case, scrape off coating with non-metallic scraper or fingernail.
    • Clean both sides with Scotchbrite, not sandpaper.
    • Don’t be too rough, just polish it to a nice crosshatch, not down to the copper.
    • Clean with paper towel and alcohol or toluene.
  • Two-position switch capable with user-added toggle.  Directions for switching are on support site.  (link)
  • Reprogrammable many times using Jaybird.

Jaybird mini-USB chip reader/writer

  • Small size, low cost, $75 – link.
  • Allows reading and writing of the F3 modules.
  • No datalogging or emulation with the Jaybird. No EEC box reading.  Most basic chip programmer available.

Quarterhorse Realtime Emulator and Datalogger

  • Hardware unit is $249 – link.  All cabling is included, along with ferrite shields and USB bulkhead connections.
  • Optional rotary switch ($30 – link) can be used to select from several different programs on the device, switching on-the-fly.  Works for EECIV ONLY.
  • Fits onto J3 port like a chip module -  port MUST be clean as with F3 modules.
  • On some early EEC boxes, several components will need to be gently bent out of the way for clearance during installation.
  • The Quarterhorse is an integrated unit that can do several things:
    • Realtime Emulation
      • Changes in the calibration take effect immediately while engine is running.
      • No disturbance in engine operation or communications.
      • Changes in software are synchronized on the Quarterhorse.
    • Datalogging
      • Requires special definition file with ‘patch code’ written for the QuarterHorse, allowing RAM on the EEC to be shadowed onto the Quarterhorse.
      • Unprecedented access to variables and sensor values through the QuarterHorse without additional datalogging hardware.
      • Logging rates in excess of 5 kHz possible.  Most software logs around 20 Hz, which is great for tuning.
    • EEC Reading
      • EEC must be installed and powered in-vehicle with QH installed.
      • You can read the tune from the EEC box and save it to file.
      • This can be done with a stock EEC to acquire the base calibration.
      • You will be able to harvest the active calibration that has been programmed with a flash programmer this way.

Burn2 with F2A and F2E adapters

  • The Burn2 ($85 – link) is a general purpose chip programmer that can be used for many different devices.
  • When used with the F2A adapter ($10 – link), it can be used to read/write F3 modules.
  • If the F2E adapter is added (another $10 – link), you will be able to read EEC boxes.
  • No emulation or datalogging – this is a simple chip programmer only.
  • This hardware combination is best suited for people that plan to tune vehicles from many different manufacturers.  If you plan on tuning exclusively Fords, consider the Jaybird as a less expensive alternative.

F8 chip module with Destiny programmer

  • No emulation or datalogging – this is a simple chip with switchable tunes.
  • Available exclusively through our distributor DP Tuner
  • The $165 F8 module holds 8 switchable tunes and can be reprogrammed in-vehicle without removing the chip from the EEC!
  • The $150 Destiny programmer is used with a 4-pin switch cable while F8 module stays installed on EEC.
  • Once programmed, the $30 rotary switch can optionally be connected as a calibration selector.

Wideband O2 Sensor and Controller

  • Used to sense your engine’s Air-Fuel ratio through exhaust gas analysis.
  • Units such as the Innovate DB-Red LC1 Gauge Kit /w/ O2 ($209 – link) are very affordable.
  • Software (discussed separately here) supports direct logging of the Innovate device data using a serial interface.  This is the preferred method of logging wideband data because it avoids all the pitfalls of using analog signals.
  • Analog outputs from the wideband (such as the LC1) can be connected directly to the EEC in some cases (unused EGR pin on A9L for example).
  • Wideband O2 readings critical for tuning fueling parameters.

Chapter 3: Software Selection, Installation, and Licensing

Several different software packages currently work with our hardware.  Cost varies considerably considerably from package to package along with capabilities.  Each software package also has its own unique flavor of interface – you will probably like one better than another.  Luckily, you can download and check them out prior to purchase.  Also remember that support for various box codes / strategies varies considerably from package to package.  It is important to investigate not just whether there is ANY support for a particular strategy but whether the items you require to tune your vehicle are supported – definition files vary considerably from software to software.  Fortunately, the availability of ‘trial’ versions makes it possible to ensure you to find a software package that fits your needs without having to purchase each one.

Binary Editor ( http://www.eecanalyzer.net )

  • Written by Clint Garrity.
  • Currently has the largest user base.
  • Cost is $80 for the base application which is registered to a specific PC.
  • Includes many of the most common and popular definitions (GUFB, etc) with no additional cost.  ( this list has almost all the “free” definitions along with some pay defs )
  • Other ‘premium’ encoded definitions available at extra cost ($50-150+) from the definition author.
  • Tends to benefit from a faster/newer laptop. Code is a bit heavy, so older PCs are taxed.  Think 2Ghz P4 / 512Mb ram realistic minimum.
  • Includes EEC reading, chip reading and burning, datalogging, and emulation capabilities when used with the appropriate hardware.
  • Also includes logging for wideband (Innovate, PLX, etc).
  • Also includes optional support for standalone dataloggers, J2534 interfaces.
  • Companion software EEC Analyzer is available for an additional $50. Not necessary, but it helps with data interpretation.
  • Licensing occurs after you install the software from the available downloads, through a menu item within the BE and EA software programs.
  • Both BE and EA licenses can be purchased from the webstore with information from the program.  See webstore product page for further instructions.

EEC Editor ( http://www.moates.net )

  • Written by Paul Booth.
  • Fairly lightweight software – does not require a very fast PC to work well.
  • Cost ranges from $20-65 for each strategy depending on options.
    • EEC-IV is $20 for editing DEF (emulation and chip burning) plus $25 for datalogging (DLM) .
    • EEC-V is $10 more ($30+$35).
    • In order to have a comprehensive tuning solution for a typical fox body Mustang, you would need to order the GUFB def ($20) and the GUFB DLM ($25) along with a QuarterHorse.  This would allow you to tune any number of vehicles using the A9L, A3M, etc. processor codes.  You can also burn chips with the Jaybird/BURN2+F2A for any strategies you have purchased.
  • Includes logging for Innovate Wideband (LC1, LM1, etc) at no additional charge.
  • List of available supported strategies is listed on the webstore.

TunerPro RT v5 ( http://www.tunerpro.net )

  • Written by Mark Mansur.
  • Software license is optional (nag screen) but encouraged for $30.
  • Editing portion of software *extremely* lightweight – can run well on older PCs.  Parts of logging engine considerably more demanding.
  • Many definitions are available for editing only, see Tunerpro.net and our website for details.
  • Editing, chip burning and emulation are supported by TPRT V4 and TPRT V5.
  • Datalogging using the QuarterHorse is supported by TunerPro RT V5 via new the ADX format.  See here for updated definitions.
  • QuarterHorse vehicle support is very limited compared to other software, but some of the most popular ones (GUFB CBAZA etc) are well-developed and available at time of writing (December 2010)

Flash & Burn Interface ( Moates/TunerPro )

  • This is a low-level utility for reading and writing F3 chip modules using Jaybird or  BURN1/BURN2 + F2A
  • Capable of reading EEC boxes using BURN2+F2A+F2E.  Does not work with QuarterHorse
  • If you have a raw binary file ( bin ) you can use Flash n Burn to program a F3 chip module
  • No cost, can be downloaded from the webstore.

F8 Destiny Utility ( http://www.moates.net )

  • For use with a Destiny and F8 multi-position in-situ chip module.
  • Allows easy management of stacks of tunes on the module with PC-based selection.
  • No cost, can be downloaded from the webstore.

USB Driver ( Moates.net / FTDI )

  • Needed to allow PC to communicate with the USB hardware (Quarterhorse, Jaybird, BURN2, etc).
  • In many cases, working drivers will be detected by Windows via plug n play.
  • If you need more visual directions, there is an install guide available on the Moates support site.
  • If you have trouble with the install, there is troubleshooting guide available on the Moates support site.

Chapter 4: Suggested Techniques for Effective Calibration of EEC Systems

Vehicle Inspection and Preparation

  • CRITICAL part of the tuning process. Start here, really.  If you fail here, you will never succeed.
  • Several areas of the vehicle should always be analyzed before you begin the effort.
    • Smoking – learn to identify fuel (black) vs. oil (grey-blue) vs. coolant (white/sweet smelling).  You cannot fix oil smoke or coolant smoke with a tune.
    • Compression – you should have all cylinders within 10% compression of each other.  If smoking, damage to old spark plugs or general appearances make you suspicious of the motor’s health, check it before you start.  It’s a lot easier to deal with a motor with poor compression BEFORE you beat the snot out of it in the course of tuning it.  Many people skip this but it is something to think about because a motor that is already hurt is very likely to blow up or experience a catastrophic failure during tuning.
    • Check base timing, adjust as needed. (all vehicles with a distributor)
    • Evaluate TPS voltage.  Minimum/maximum values should be within acceptable limits.  Check for reversed wires – voltage should increase as throttle opens.
    • Look at MAF intake routing, make sure there are no obvious vacuum / intake leaks between the MAF and the intake valves.  Think cracked/split/loose hoses, bad gaskets, open ports, dry rotted couplers, hoses connected both before and after the MAF, …
    • O2 sensors should be operational without any exhaust leaks before the sensors.  For some reason, cut and soldered “extensions” for long tube headers often cause problems.  Plug and play extenders are *highly* recommended.  If you know that you do not have proper stock O2 sensors, REMEMBER TO TURN OFF O2 FEEDBACK!!!
    • If you are using a wideband sensor, you need to make sure there are no exhaust leaks before the wideband.  Flex tubing, poor joints between headers- midpipes and cracks in tubing can all create havoc.
    • If applicable, pay attention to which bank the wideband is installed in – bank-bank differences can be a powerful diagnostic tool.  Pay attention to how far the wideband is from the engine’s exhaust ports – there is always some lag between combustion events and measurement.  When things are changing quickly, this is critical.
    • Widebands need calibrated periodically, generally in free air.  Wideband sensors need replaced periodically.  Leaded fuel kills them very quickly.  Proper care and feeding of widebands is crucial to their effectiveness.
    • Be aware of catalytic converters.  Always tap them (GENTLY) and listen for suspicious noises that would indicate a catalytic converter that is degrading.  Clogged cats can rob literally hundreds of horsepower.  It is possible to place a wideband sensor AFTER a catalytic converter but remember that the cat will very slightly skew readings.
    • Make sure you have enough fuel pump and injectors for the power level you are looking for.  For a V8, “Injector size in #/hr * 14 = max hp” is a crude rule of thumb.  There are tons of injector calculators to be found if you want a better idea.
    • Ensure that fuel pressure is sane.  40psi with no vacuum reference is generally about where most OEM regulators are set.  You should be able to see a difference in fuel pressure between key-on-engine-off, idle and blipping the throttle.  Fuel pressure should be lowest when vacuum is highest.  Fuel pressure should increase when you blip the throttle as manifold pressure increases.
    • You need a MAF capable of metering enough air for your power goals.   There are ways to increase the metering capacity of a given meter, but tuning that properly is an advanced topic.  Keeping it simple: get a meter that can handle your airflow needs.
    • You need a functioning alternator and battery.  Battery voltage plays a role in crucial things like injector opening time and coil charge duration.  If your charging system is not functioning correctly, your tune may drastically change if/when you fix it.  Rule of thumb: if your battery voltage ever drops below 13 volts with the motor running, you will run into trouble.
    • On a similar note, underdrive and overdrive pulleys can cause real issues.  Pay attention if you see them.
    • Check for emissions hardware ( purge, smog pump, EGR, etc. ) that is missing.  In many cases these items can be disabled but you need to pay attention to what is present compared to what the ECM expects.
    • Basic maintenance should not be overlooked.  If it is important for a “normal” car it is twice as important in a performance application.
      • Spark plugs: correct heat range, appropriate gap, not fouled.  Consider power level, fuel and ignition system.  AVOID PLATINUM PLUGS FOR PERFORMANCE APPLICATIONS!!!  Copper or iridium will serve you much better.
      • Plug wires: no cracks/arcing, properly crimped ends, appropriate length so there isn’t too much tension
      • Firing order: firing order is determined by the camshaft (mostly) not the block or computer.
      • Spark boxes: great for distributor engines, unneeded/problematic for mod motors
      • Coil packs: Coil-per-cylinder (99-04 generally) applications like ***OEM*** coils best. (according to Dave B.)  MSD, Accel, Granatelli, … are all cause for concern especially with boost.
      • Oil and coolant: always check fluids before starting.  Quick check, potentially horrible consequences if low/out.
      • Fans / overheating: it is always a good idea to check that radiator fans work.  A car that overheats cannot be tuned.
      • Belts and Idlers: All serpentine belts must be in good shape.  Cracks, missing ribs, etc. will all cause problems.  Any idler pulleys must spin freely.
      • Tension:  Belt Tensioner should not be extended fully with the engine off.  Adjust belt length so that tensioner is in the lower third of its adjustment range with the motor off.  (i.e. it can move 2/3 through its range to increase belt tension – it should be mostly compressed when motor idle)  This is particularly important for supercharged applications.
      • Fuel filter: Fords are *horrible* about clogging fuel filters.  Especially if the car has been sitting for any significant period of time, change the fuel filter.  Motorcraft/OEM filters seem to hold up better than many cheap aftermarket ones.
      • Fuel age and type: Gasoline degrades with time.  Do not expect fuel that is more than a month or two old to be of the same quality as fresh gas.  Be particularly careful with heavily oxygenated fuels (i.e. VP Q16) and alcohols (ethanol, methanol, E85, etc.) in contact with fuel system components for large periods of time.
      • Clean air filter and MAF.  Oiled filters generally cause MAFs to get dirty.  Clean MAFs only after they have had a long time to cool – hot MAF+liquid=death.  Clean *GENTLY* with brake clean, starting fluid, or other organic solvents.
  • Remember, you can’t fix mechanical or electrical issues by reprogramming the ECM!!! The results you achieve with tuning will only be as good as the material you start working with.  Garbage in, garbage out.

Datalogging: What’s important and what does it mean? What should we be interested in? What to select?

  • There are certain sensors that you will almost always want to keep an eye on because they are critical to engine operation:
    • RPM – how fast the motor is spinning
    • MAFV / MAF counts – a “raw” value representing the reading from the MAF sensor
    • Airflow – a value calculated  by the ECM from the raw sensor MAF voltage that represents how much air is being ingested by the engine.  This is often represented in some form of “real world” value, like Kg/hr or Lbs/min
    • Load – from 94-2004 “Load” is the main factor involved in determining spark advance.
    • Spark Advance – when the ECM is commanding sparks to be fired.
    • TPS – Throttle Position Sensor.  How far open the throttle is, i.e. how hard you’re pressing the gas pedal
    • ECT – Engine Coolant Temperature(how hot or cold coolant flowing through the engine is)
    • IAT – Intake Air Temperature (how hot or cold air entering the engine is)
  • Depending on what you are trying to do, there are other items you may want to pay attention to as well.
    • Injector Pulsewidth – How long the injectors open.  This can be useful both for “sanity checking” and to ensure you do not run out of injector – there is only a fixed time available at a given RPM to fire injectors.
    • HEGO1/2 – Heated Exhaust Gas Oxygen sensor.  Measures the presence or absence of oxygen in the exhaust in order to try to determine whether the motor is running rich or lean.   Watching the raw HEGO voltages can give you some kind of very basic indication of fueling.  These sensors experience a large change in voltage in a very small area centered around a stoichiometric mixture ( 1.0 lambda or about 14.7:1 Air-Fuel Ratio or AFR)
    • STFTs – Short Term Fuel Trims.  These are IMMEDIATE changes the ECM makes in response to HEGO readings in order to steer the air-fuel mixture towards desired targets.   If your EEC uses STFTs effectively (i.e. all modular motors) then these are generally more effective as a tuning tool than looking at raw O2 voltages.
    • LTFTs – Long Term Fuel Trims.  These are the long term difference between programmed values and target values.  Think of them as the average of STFTs over a long time.  If your EEC uses LTFTs effectively (i.e. all modular motors) then these are one of the most effective pieces of data provided by the stock computer for tuning fueling.
    • WBO2 – Wideband Oxygen meters can measure a much wider range of rich-lean conditions than standard HEGOs.  Having wideband data is often preferable to HEGO/STFT/LTFT.  In many cases (i.e. 86-95 in my opinion) it is often easier to disable closed loop operation/the O2 sensors completely and tune the car exclusively using a wideband.
    • ISC Integrator (‘integrator’) – this represents the difference between how much air the EEC is using to hold and idle versus how much it is commanded to hold in the tune.  Critical for proper tuning of larger camshafts and larger displacement engines.
    • Boost/MAP/Pressure – Although MAF systems do not differentiate between boost and vacuum, it is often very handy for sanity and safety to have an idea of how much pressure there is in the intake manifold.  For positive displacement blowers (roots, TVS, twin-screw) make sure you take pressure readings AFTER the blower on the lower plenum.
    • Pressure drop across injectors / FPDM duty cycle – most 99-04 cars control fuel pressure electronically.  These values are critical to a properly operating fuel system on these vehicles.

Recalibration: Modifying Parameters and Values to Achieve a Target

  • First step: decide on target operating parameters for the engine
    • This may seem obvious, but something as simple as “make the most power” or “improve fuel economy” isn’t going to be be enough.
    • Second step: take a general goal like “make the most power” and decide on appropriate engine conditions to achieve that goal.
    • If you read these rules of thumb and say “this isn’t right for my engine” – GREAT.  You already know more than the audience these rules are aimed at.
      • If in doubt, “0.8 is great” – blatant simplicity.  Quoted me to once by someone who did OEM calibrations for Honda for a living.  It is very difficult to break anything due to fueling from running a vehicle at 0.8 lambda (about 11.6:1 AFR Gasoline)
      • 1.0 Lambda represents a stoichiometric mixture – exactly enough oxygen is present in the air to burn all the fuel supplied.  This is normally the best mixture for minimizing emissions.
      • Most vehicles make best power around 0.85 to 0.88 lambda (12.3 – 12.7 AFR Gasoline) – slightly richer than stoich
      • Most vehicles achieve best fuel economy at around 1.05 to 1.1 lambda ( 15.2 to 16.0 AFR gasoline)
      • Most vehicles need more ignition advance as RPM increases
      • Most vehicles need more ignition advance under cruising/low-throttle conditions than WOT
      • Knock is most likely close to peak torque, at high loads/low RPMs or at peak horsepower
  • Next step: Get familiar with the strategy your vehicle uses.  Fueling, timing, idle, open-closed loop and just about everything else vary considerably from one strategy to another.  Being familiar with the strategy your ECM uses will help you figure out which tables to modify to acheive the results you seek.
    • eectuning.org is a good place to learn more.
    • the ‘Education’ section of moates.net is another good place to get information
  • After you figure out where to look: set up what you can based on what you already know
    • Setup Engine Displacement / displacement of one cylinder
    • Setup injector size
    • Setup a reasonable rev limiter based on what you know of bottom end and valvetrain
    • Setup a reasonable (perhaps a little high to start) value for target idle
    • Setup a reasonable base calibration for MAF sensor.  If sensor came with a calibration sheet, this would be great time to use it.
    • Setup a reasonable target air fuel while in open loop
    • Setup a reasonable timing map.  A stock timing map adjusted for mods is always a good place to start.
    • Setup a reasonable pattern from switching from closed loop to open loop.
    • Enable or disable hardware such as O2 sensors, EGR, Purge/Evap, automatic trans
    • If you take your time to create a sane starting point before you turn the key on you will save yourself countless hours of time!
  • Finally: Start your engines (and your datalogger) and make final adjustments
    • Are air fuels not matching what you command in open loop?
      • Three pieces of the fueling puzzle:  MAF transfer, Injector slopes(size), Injector offset (battery compensation – latency)
      • How do you tell what is going on?  STFTs, LTFTs (if O2s are enabled) combined with a wideband.  STFTs/LTFTs are great while O2s are active – i.e. part throttle
      • Leanest at idle, small pulsewidths but perfect at WOT/higher throttle -> increase battery offset
      • Lean – rich – lean patches as you gradually increase throttle -> wrong shape of MAF curve.  systematically tune it
      • Entire range of engine operation uniformly off from commanded values -> either injector slopes (size) or entire MAF transfer function is off.  Let load determine which one to multiply/divide in order to fix things
    • Idle issues?
      • Make sure your MAF transfer table, injector slopes and injector offset are sane before trying to fine tune idle!
      • Follow the integrator – a good place to start is to add the integrator (or subtract if it is negative) from the Neutral Idle Air table (in neutral) or Drive Idle Air table (if in Drive for automatic cars)
    • Performance
      • ALWAYS TUNE FUELING FIRST BEFORE TACKLING TIMING!  You are *much* more likely to break your engine if your mixture is wrong.  As long as your timing is good enough to light the mix, you can tune fueling adequately.
      • Tuning timing without a dyno is hard.  Accelerometers and a dragstrip can provide crude but repeatable feedback.

Data Analysis and Evaluation

  • Once captured, the operational data can be analyzed and used to guide calibration effort.

(More to come!)

(below this line is draft / coming soon as of 2010-11-30)

Chapter 4:  Software/Hardware Initial Configuration with Tuning Session Start-Up Examples

  • Physical installation of hardware is shown in more detail from Chapter 1 overview.
    • F3
    • Jaybird
    • Quarterhorse
    • F8/destiny and switch
    • Wideband
  • Installation, licensing, initial configuration, and detailed hardware synchronization procedures for each software are explained and examples detailed. Initial basic calibration load-up for different hardware, as well as basic payload creation for datalogging, are explained and illustrated for each.
    • USB Driver
    • BE/EA
    • EEC Editor
    • TunerPro RTv5
    • Flash & Burn
    • F8/Destiny Utility
  1. Data Analysis and Evaluation
    1. Once captured, the operational data can be analyzed and used to guide calibration effort.
    2. Several examples of logged data values and how they relate to calibration parameters are provided.

Chapter 6:

Case Studies: Example Modifications, Vehicle Combinations, and Rules of Thumb

  1. Key Issues and Vehicle-Specific Examples
    1. How do many of the popular modifications on these vehicles affect the tuning approach?

i.      Bigger MAF

ii.      Bigger injectors

iii.      Cold plugs

iv.      Nitrous

v.      Gears and converter

vi.      Auto vs Manual

vii.      Emissions delete / racing modifications

viii.      Cam, heads

ix.      Headers/exhaust

x.      Cold air intake

    1. We look at a walk-through of important considerations and the thought process of tuning several different example combinations, with real-world dyno results.

i.      A9L/GUFB Fox Body, 1993 N/A 331 stroker, 24# injectors, cam, headers, 5spd.

ii.      CBAZA, same as above.

iii.      03/04 Mustang

iv.      SC A9L

v.      SC 03/04 Cobra

vi.      F150 Truck

    1. Achieving an Optimized Result: When is it good enough?

i.      What are your goals?

ii.      Do you plan for future modifications?

iii.      Rules of thumb for AFR and timing, NA vs boost.

iv.      What is safe vs aggressive?

>

>

>

> Vehicle Compatibility

>

> All year/model Ford 2004 and earlier with J3 port are compatible

***with our hardware*** but there may not be software support for particular models.

> Some vehicle year/model applications are simply not supported in the

> software because of lack of definition information. It’s important to

> evaluate the availability of your desired application as ir relates to

> the software selection process. You may be out of luck (for example,

> 1995 Festiva or such uncommon target).

http://support.moates.net/ford-strategies-supported/

http://support.moates.net/ford-box-code-strategy-cross-reference/

>

>

>

> Overview of Tuning Process

>

> Determine your target vehicle boxcode and strategy

>

>                                                                i.

> Boxcode is typically a 4-digit letter/number code on the EEC computer.

> This is the calibration code.

http://support.moates.net/ford-information-we-need-to-help-you/

>

>                                                               ii.

> Strategy is the ‘parent’ definition structure to which a boxcode belongs.

Each strategy is the set of procedures that are executed on your ECM to run an engine.  Sometimes more than one strategy can successfully run on a given ECM.  Normally we do not make many changes to the procedure part of strategies while tuning vehicles.  Instead, we change tables, functions and constants so that the engine receives what it needs to run well.  Each “box code” represents a configuration of a particular strategy for a particular engine.

>

>                                                             iii.

> For

instance, the A9L boxcode  belongs to the GUFB strategy.  The A3M boxcode also belongs to the GUFB strategy.  If you compare A9L.bin and A3M.bin the files will be almost identical because they use the same strategy but are configured for different vehicles by Ford.  If you get a definition (also called def) for the GUFB strategy, you will be able to edit both A9L and A3M binaries because they use the same strategy.

……….

>                                                             iii.

> J3 port MUST be thoroughly cleaned, both sides, before installation!

***IMPORTANT***

……………….

> Chapter 5:

>

> Suggested Techniques for Effective Calibration of EEC Systems

>

>

>

>

>

> Vehicle Inspection and Preparation

>

> CRITICAL part of the tuning process. Start here, really.

> Several areas of the vehicle should always be analyzed before you

> begin the effort.

>

>                                                                i.

> Check base timing, adjust as needed.  On older Fords, pull “spout” timing connector either by distributor (86-93) or on passenger fender side (94-95).  Adjust distributor to achieve 10 degrees base timing with spout removed.  Reinstall spout before tuning.

>

>                                                               ii.

> Evaluate TPS voltage, make sure it is in range through motion.

Vehicles are very sensitive to improper TPS voltage.  TPS being too low or too high can cause the ECM to not enter the correct idle mode.

TPS should be between 0.95 and 1volt with throttle plate closed.  This can be checked using QH quite nicely.

>

>                                                             iii.

> Look at MAF intake routing, make sure there are no gross vacuum / intake leaks.

http://support.moates.net/tuning-maf-systems-and-air-leaks/

See how much or little of that you want to put here.

>

>                                                             iv.

> O2 sensors should be operational, exhaust should be leak-tight at

> least that far back.

OEM Ford O2 sensors work a million times better than cheap aftermarket ones.

Ideally, a wideband sensor is to be installed in addition to the factory O2s rather than instead of one.

If this is not possible, it is greatly preferable to remove a secondary (Post-catalytic converter) O2 sensor.

If a primary O2 sensor has the be removed in order to install a wideband, make sure closed loop operation is disabled.

>

>                                                              v.

> Basic maintenance should not be overlooked.

>

> 1.       Plugs and wires

1a. PLUG GAP IS REALLY IMPORTANT

1b. Appropriate plug type is really important (Copper, Silver (Brisk for 3v)).  Iridium plugs are ok for applications with extremely strong spark boxes or CDI systems.  Avoid platinum plugs like the plague.

>

> 2.       Oil and coolant

>

> 3.       Fuel filter and fuel age/quality/octane

>

> 4.       Clean air filter and MAF

>

>                                                             vi.

> Ensure that fuel pressure is as expected through operating range.

>

> Remember, you can’t fix mechanical or electrical issues with reprogramming.

> Tuning is about more than just flipping chips, so make sure your

> vehicle is in good shape!

This really can’t be stressed enough.  Tuning a car that isn’t running right is like putting a bandaid over a gangrenous wound!  The first step to tuning a car properly is to make sure it is mechanically sound!

>

>

>

************I’m not sure I would get into datalogging just yet because we haven’t talked about recalibration yet.****************

> Datalogging: What’s important and what does it mean? What should we be

> interested in? What to select?

>

> RPM

> MAFV

> Kg/Hr

> Spark

> HEGO1/2

> TPS

> ECT,IAT

> Load

> WBO2

>

***********************************Snip*********************************************************************************************************

>

>

> Recalibration: Modifying Parameters and Values

>

The purpose of recalibrating an ECM is to produce the behavior you desire, and by doing so hopefully improve performance, emissions or other operating characteristics.  Normally, there are two stages to this process.

First, parameters within the strategy are altered to match physical parameters of the engine.  Engine displacement, injector size are the primary values here.  Also, the MAF transfer function should be altered to match the MAF that is installed on the vehicle.  You can often “rob” a MAF transfer function from another vehicle’s strategy when using the MAF from another vehicle.

Next, operating parameters are changed in order to achieve the actual running conditions desired for the particular engine.  In many cases, simply adjusting the “configuration” items for the strategy in the first step will make then engine run great but there are almost always small changes that can be made to optimize performance.

>

> What are the most common values we will need to modify?

>

i.     Displacement – how large the engine is

ii.      Injector slopes – define how much fuel flows through

injectors, aka injector size

iii.      MAF calibration – defines how much air enters the engine as

a function of MAF voltage.  aka MAF transfer function iv.      Rev limiters – protect the engine from being damaged by over-revving

v.      Speed limiters – protect the driver from his/her own stupidity

vi.      EGR delete, PATS delete, secondary O2 delete – turn off items that are not present or not desired.

>

> How do we know which values to change, and by how much?

>

(repeat / correlate with above)

First step: calibration data should match actual equipment specification

example: If you have a 347 stroker with 30# injectors your strategy should be configured to match these physical parameters

Next step: start your engines, identify problems and goals.  There are hundreds (if not thousands in some cases) of parameters you can change.  Before starting on tuning, it’s good to have an idea of what’s not right, what you’d like to improve and what you can leave alone.  This may sound basic, but maintaining some kind of focus is really important to working effectively.  Examples of things you might want to work on are improving idle, improving wide open throttle performance, decreasing fuel consumption.

After figuring out what aspects of running the engine you want to work on, it is time to get the data you need to achieve your goals.  By selecting appropriate items for datalogging, the QuarterHorse allows you to view, log and replay the same data that your ECM uses to run your engine.  Instead of blindly guessing which values you need to change in order to get the engine behavior you seek, you can use this process of logging, analyzing logged data and a little math to make appropriate changes.

Now specific tasks in the tuning process will be examined in detail.

This will be presented as a mixture of theory and practice.  The next chapter will serve as a guide for how to adapt the programming of your ECM to suit specific modifications (cold air kits, injectors, motor transplants, etc) and will be attempt to be primarily hands-on.

Routine tuning processes: (these are going to need more explanation, I’m just running out of steam tonight)

Basic setup – Slopes, injectors, MAFs, sane spark tables

WOT / Open loop fueling – MAF transfer, inj slopes, stabilized fuel table

Closed loop fueling – O2 trims, MAF transfer

Power tuning – Dyno, spark tables

Idle tuning – idle RPM drive, neutral, Drive idle air, neutral idle air, integrator, gains, etc

Dashpot – role, tuning, scalars, preposition

>

>

>

> Chapter 6:

>

CASE STUDIES AND HANDS ON PRIMARILY.  Theory / processes in previous chapter

>

>

>

>

>

> Key Issues and Vehicle-Specific Examples

*MAKE MORE SPECIFIC*  General procedures covered above

>

> How do many of the popular modifications on these vehicles affect the

> tuning approach?

>

>                                                                i.

> Bigger MAF

>

>                                                               ii.

> Bigger injectors

>

>                                                             iii.

> Cold plugs

>

>                                                             iv.

> Nitrous

>

>                                                              v.

> Gears and converter

>

>                                                             vi.

> Auto vs Manual

>

>                                                           vii.

> Emissions delete / racing modifications

>

>                                                          viii.

> Cam, heads

>

>                                                             ix.

> Headers/exhaust

>

>                                                              x.

> Cold air intake

>

> We look at a walk-through of important considerations and the thought

> process of tuning several different example combinations, with

> real-world dyno results.

>

>                                                                i.

> A9L/GUFB Fox Body, 1993 N/A 331 stroker, 24# injectors, cam, headers, 5spd.

>

>                                                               ii.

> CBAZA, same as above.

>

>                                                             iii.

> 03/04 Mustang

>

>                                                             iv.

> SC A9L

>

>                                                              v.

> SC

> 03/04 Cobra

>

>                                                             vi.

> F150 Truck

>

> Achieving an Optimized Result: When is it good enough?

>

>                                                                i.

> What are your goals?

>

>                                                               ii.

> Do you plan for future modifications?

>

>                                                             iii.

> Rules of thumb for AFR and timing, NA vs boost.

>

>                                                             iv.

> What is safe vs aggressive?

>

>

Install USB drivers, Configure software, synchronize it with the hardware via USB, and load up initial calibration.
Establish communications, check settings.

Ford Overview (READ ME)

“I have a Ford.  What do I need to tune my car?” is an email we frequently receive.  Hopefully this page will provide some answers.

We also often get asked, “Can I use your product to let me put _______ on my engine?” The answer to this is very simple: our products let you tune factory Ford computers.  If the factory Ford computer can do it, our products can help you tune it.  If there is another factory Ford computer that you can swap to run your engine that does what you want, great.  Some examples of what I’m talking about here include putting a MAF sensor on a car, running a car without a MAF speed-density, switching to coilpacks, etc.  If you can’t do it with a factory Ford ECM, our products aren’t going to help you achieve your goals.

We offer products that work with almost all ~1986-2004 Ford ECUs that have a J3 port (i.e. EECIV and EECV).  International users report success using our products with non-US computers that have a J3 port.  A J3 port looks like an edge of a circuit board that kind of sticks out.  J3 ports must be cleaned with a wire brush and solvents in order to remove the protective coating on the circuit board before they can be used.  They are almost always behind a rubber protective panel.  We do not offer any products for Ford computers that lack a J3 port, such as pre-1986 and 2005+ computers.  Also, cars branded by Ford but manufactured by others (i.e. Ford Probe, made by Mazda) often use computers that lack J3 ports.

It is critical that the vehicle is fully off before installing or removing anything on the J3 port.  Failure to power-off the ECM correctly can result in frying our hardware, your ECM or both!!!  If you have any doubts at all, remove the keys from the ignition 100% or disconnect the battery.  WARNING WARNING WARNING!

On this page “application” simply means the car/ECU/engine you are working with.

“ECU” means ECM, PCM – the computer running your car’s engine.

“Strategy” is Ford lingo for a set of procedures (i.e. code) that an ECU runs.  (Closest GM term: Operating system)  Most of the time, a strategy is particular to an ECU, i.e. the GUFB strategy runs onA9L ECUs.  Sometimes more than one strategy can run on the same ECU (i.e. GUFB/A9L + GUFC/A9P) .  Most of the time the “tuner” cars (i.e. Roush, Saleen) use unusual strategies that are often simply renamed factory strategies.

“Definition” means a file that describes the location of parameters that can be changed in a strategy.  All of the Ford tuning software uses definition files to process raw files.

“Patch code” refers to special routines that change the way a strategy operates in order to allow Quarterhorse to log all vehicle parameters.

Hardware used with Ford:

F3 Chip adapter – This stores a new program for a Ford ECU and clips on the J3 port.  This is a simple Ford “chip” that can optionally store two programs.  It works with both EECIV and EECV.

Jaybird – This is a Ford-specific device that writes F3 chip adapters ONLY.  It uses the same Flash n Burn software as a BURN1/BURN2

F2A – The F2A is a Ford interface for the BURN1/BURN2 programmers.  It lets you write a F3 chip adapter using a BURN1/2 programmer and the Flash n Burn software.

F2E – the F2E is used with a F2A and a BURN1/2 to read the stock program from a ECU.

BURN1/BURN2 – These general purpose ROM burners can be used with a F2A to program F3 chips

FORDEMU – This adapter allows the use of a Ostrich emulator to make real-time changes with a Ford ECU.  This product has been replaced with the Quarterhorse.  It does not work very well with EECV ECUs.

Quarterhorse – The Quarterhorse (or “QH” for short) is our flagship Ford tuning product.  It allows changes to be made while the vehicle is running.  It also allows datalogging by spying directly on RAM locations.  In order to log all vehicle parameters, patch code that is specific to each strategy is required.  Many of the features of QH require special definition files and/or software support that may not be available for all applications.

Software for Tuning Fords:

You can read the binary from any J3 Ford computer with our gear (BURN2+F2A+F2E), but that does NOT mean that any J3 ford computer is fair game.  In order to be able to display a raw binary from a Ford ECM in a real-world units that might make sense to you, a definition is required.  The def is kind of like a roadmap that allows software (Binary Editor or EEC Editor) to translate what runs the car’s computer into something meaningful to you.  Defs have to be developed by a human being for each application.  PLEASE ASK US FOR HELP IF YOU ARE NOT SURE YOUR APPLICATION IS SUPPORTED!!!

TunerPro / TunerPro RT (www.tunerpro.net) : Great for basic editing.  Free.  Somewhat limited definitions compared with other software.  At time of writing (11/28/09) lacks full support for QH, but beta versions have support.

EEC Editor http://www.moates.net/eec-editor-software-from-paul-booth.html : Cheap ( <$50 ) software with fairly extensive editing support for editing Ford tunes.  EEC Editor requires you to purchase definitions on a per-strategy basis.  One strategy will cover more than one box code.  Definitions for datalogging can be purchased separately.  As of time of writing (11/28/09) has QH support for MANY applications including Fox body mustang (GUFB/GUFC/etc. A9L/A9P/C3W/etc.) 94-95 Mustang (T4M0, CBAZA) along with many 96-03 applications.  Custom definitions available for a fee.

Binary Editor (http://www.eecanalyzer.net) : Relatively cheap ( $80 BE / $130 BE + EEC Analyzer) software with comprehensive editing support and comprehensive support for QH.  See here for a list of strategies supported.  Binary Editor comes with a bunch of definitions that are free and there are others you need to pay for.  You can see most of them at http://www.eecanalyzer.net in the downloads section.

Honda Overview READ ME!

Summary

Only certain Hondas can be tuned using our hardware. In short, these are any vehicles that run a B, D, H, or F (Accord) series engine with a distributor and can run an OBD I ECU. Whether they accept these ECUs natively or via an OBD II to OBD I or OBD0 to OBD I conversion harness makes no difference.

Some of the OBD0 (pre-92) vehicles can be chipped and tuned natively, but the OBD I software tools are so much more advanced and user friendly that it is worth considering converting these vehicles to OBD1 with a conversion harness when possible.

If you have a 1996-2001 Honda, you will need to remove your stock OBD2 ECU and plug-in a supported OBD I ECU via a conversion harness. Please make sure you order the appropriate harness for your car as different model years used different connectors.

Supported Vehicles

  • 1992-2000 Civic (1996-2000 Civics require OBD2-OBD1 conversion harness, use 92-95 OBD1 ECU)
  • 1992-2001 Integra (1996-2001 Integras require OBD2-OBD1 conversion harness, use OBD1 ECU)
  • 1992-2001 Prelude/Accord (1996-2001 Preludes require OBD2-OBD1 conversion harness, requires Integra or Civic OBD1 ECU swap, )
  • 1988-1991 Civic/CRX Si-HF or swapped cars (can use OBD1 ECU and OBD1 tools with OBD1/OBD2 distributor swap and conversion harness)
  • 1988-1991 Integra/CR-X/Civic with B16A swap (requires PR3/PW0 ECUs to use as OBD0 Vtec)
  • 1990-1991 Civic/CRX Si D16A6 (will have PM6 ECU, ready to use as OBD0 non-vtec)
  • 1988-1989 Civic/CRX Si, 1988-1991 CRX HF (requires use of a 90-91 ECU to use as OBD0 non-vtec)

Supported ECUs

  • 1992-1995 Civic (P05 | P06 | P08 | P28)
  • 1994-1995 Del Sol VTEC (P30)
  • 1992-1995 Integra GS-R (P61, P72)
  • 1992-1995 Integra RS/LS/GS/SE (PR4 | P74 | P75)
  • 1992-1995 JDM Civic, Integra, Del Sol, etc. (P30, P72, P54, P08, etc. small square case. Place note in order!!! JDM ECUs require different parts than USDM)
  • Chippable OBD-0 ECUs (PW0 | PR3 | PM6)
  • see also pgmfi wiki on the subject

Note: If you do not see your car or ECU specifically listed here, please check to make sure you do not have an unsupported setup before purchasing anything!

Supported Tuning Software

  • Neptune (targets primarily 92-95 OBD1 ECU hardware, very actively developed, advanced feature set, per-vehicle licensing)
  • eCtune (targets primarily 92-95 OBD1 ECU hardware, starting to be poorly maintained, advanced feature set, per-vehicle licensing)
  • CROME Pro (targets OBD1 ECUs, supports datalogging, getting to be poorly maintained, great for “simple” tunes, flexible licensing)  There is a very nice PDF tutorial written up by Darren Kattan. Check it out by clicking HERE.
  • CROME (as above, free but without datalogging support)
  • BRE (Primarily targets OB0 Vtec computers: PR3, PW0. Also has limited support for PM6. Only recommended for “simple” setups. Not very actively supported)
  • TurboEdit (Primarily targets OBD0 non-vtec computers, i.e. PM6. Only recommended for non-vtec engines and very simple setups. Not very actively supported)
  • Uberdata (Older application. Targets OBD1 platform. Once thought to be dead but seems to be some recent development activity)
  • FreeLog (Free, datalogging package, works with Crome, not heavily supported/updated.)

Software Recomendations

The only one of our kits that comes with software is the Demon+Neptune kit.  The Honda Tuning Kit is sold as a hardware only solution.  We recommend Xenocron.com for purchasing any software not included with your kit.  Xenocron sells both Neptune and CROME.
If you have a “serious” setup (i.e. something that you’ve put a couple thousand dollars into) and you want a package with “serious” support behind it you are pretty much limited to Neptune.
Crome works some of the time, but unless you’re a developer and want to go and fix the numerous small problems it has, you won’t get much help.
If you are looking for something free to make basic changes to your car, Crome or Uberdata is probably worth trying. You can download versions of both software for free.
The OBD0 packages (BRE, TurboEdit) are fine for “simple” setups (figure stock map sensor, 450cc injectors, redline at stock or lower, etc.) but when you start pushing things further from stock their immaturity starts to show.
The information in this section represents the opinions of Dave Blundell as of 7/2/12. As you learn more, you might come to disagree with some of what is posted here and that is fine – these are just recommendations for beginners based on years of working with all the packages listed.

Additional Information

PGMFI.org will have lots of answers for you and probably make your head want to explode if you spend too much time there. Both the forum and wiki are loaded full of useful information, but the forum in particular can be very hard to find things. Use the search function lots.

OBD1 Civic/Integra ECUs are a common hardware platform. Despite the many different models of ECU (P05, P06, P28, P30, P72, etc.) Honda only used 3 different circuit boards in the US. This means that it is very easy to use an ECU designed to run one engine to run another. JDM ECUs use different parts for chipping and modification than US ECUs. Most JDM ECUs use primarily surface mount components while USDM and European ECUs use primarily through-hole components.

Moates Hardware for Honda ECUs

Demon+Neptune – Demon hardware with a Neptune RPT license included.  Arguably the best solution available for tuning OBD1 Hondas.  Realtime tuning, datalogging, onboard logging based on trigger conditions without a laptop connected, great software.  Ideal bundle for enthusiasts looking to tune their own vehicle.

D2 Socket – standard 28 pin socket. Used for chipping pretty much all ECUs covered on this page. Part of other kits, too. Only thing needed for chipping OBD0 ECUs. Included as part of the Honda Chipping Kit.

S4 Aries Low Profile ZIF Socket – low-profile (smaller) ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket commonly used to make it easier to take chips in and out of an ECU quickly. Not essential by any means, but certainly nice. Included as part of the Honda Chipping Kit.

C2 SST 27SF512 Chip – This is *the* chip you will use if you are working with Hondas, unless you know better. Buy this if you want spare chips. Included as part of the Honda Chipping Kit.

’373 latch – 74HC373 octal latch. Required for OBD1 ECUs to talk to an external EPROM. Included as part of the Honda Chipping Kit.

C14 Cap – 220uF Electrolytic capacitor. Replaces a capacitor that is part of the power supply for the ECU. This capacitor is known to leak and go bad, blowing a hole that usually causes other damage in your ECU. Included as part of the Honda Chipping Kit.

CN2 latching header – this is used for datalogging. designed to latch and lock with the cable we supply with the Hondalog/HULOG. Normally included as part of the Honda Chipping Kit.

CN2 Straight header – this is used for datalogging. does not latch/lock the cable we supply. Basic, no frills.

Honda Chipping Kit – This kit includes everything you need to chip ONE OBD1 Honda ECU. Includes regular machine pin socket, low profile ZIF socket, 373 latch, caps, resistor, locking CN2 header and one chip. You must specify if you are using a USDM or JDM ECU! This is very important!

Install Service – don’t feel up to installing a Honda Chip Kit? Let us do it

Chip Extender – This device allows you to mount your chip away from the ECU. Usually works with Ostrich, switchers and other gizmos.

Two Timer – Allows you to program two independent programs into a 27SF512 chip and switch between them arbitrarily. Basic setup for multiple programs.

GX switcher – requires the Ex switcher. Allows selection from up to 16 programs programmed into a 29F040 chip. Advanced setup for multiple programs.

If you have a NON-VTEC ECU (PR4 | P05 | P06 | P75) and you wish to run a VTEC motor, please purchase the appropriate VTEC Upgrade kit for your ECU under the chip kit section. Each circuit board is labelled with a part number in white silkscreen lettering towards the top-center section of the board. Match this up with each of the three kits we sell. 1720 11F0 1980

PWM Boost control kit – Allows an ECU using eCtune / Neptune / Hondata to act as an PulseWidth Modulated (PWM) boost controller. Will not work with Crome or OBD0 solutions at this time. (alternative method for eCtune ONLY uses 5151 and sometimes an 810 Ohm resistor)

BURN2 – The BURN2 replaces the BURN1 and is functionally identical. The BURN2 burner is the weapon of choice for all things Honda that we support. You will use it to program chips

Ostrich 2.0 – The Ostrich2 allows flawless real-time changes to be made while the vehicle is running.

Hondalog / Xtreme HULOG – The Xtreme HULOG is a Hondalog in a durable plastic case for $5 more. They are functionally identical. They allow datalogging from ECUs that have an appropriate program and a CN2 header installed

Honda Tuning Package – This is the Xtreme HULOG, Ostrich 2.0, Burn2 and a Honda Chip Kit bundled together for savings. It includes all the hardware you need to get started. Same great stuff, cheaper price as a package. Simply buy additional Honda Chip Kits to tune additional vehicles.

84-87 Grand National 1226459 1227148

Introduction

The 84-87 Grand National was a unique car available in limited production. These vehicles featured sequential injection, distributorless ignition systems and other groundbreaking features. A combination of unusual and off the shelf ECMs/electronic components make for some unique needs.

These vehicles used two ECMs. 84-85 vehicles came equipped with the 1226459 and 86-87 vehicles came equipped with the 1227148.  These ECMs were used in a very select few other V6 vehicles of this generation with different programming for non-turbo applications.  It is possible to swap the 86-87 computers into the earlier vehicles.  Datalogging is improved with the later computers.

The Grand Nationals have a cult following.  There is a lot of information to be found in general on www.gnttype.org and the chips/ECMs are covered especially here.

Hardware Required for Tuning

  • The “early” 84-85 1226459 use the G2 *** 0.6″ *** Chip adapter
  • The “late” 86-87 1227148 use the G2 *** 0.45″ *** Chip adapter
  • To reprogram the ECM, both adapters accept a 28 pin EPROM like the C2 27SF512 chip.
  • WARNING: This is NOT plug and play!  Desoldering factory chip is required and soldering install for G2 adapter.  (view install)  Order the “Install Service” and send us your ECM if you’re not comfortable with soldering work.
  • After a chip adapter is installed, our “standard” OBD1 GM tools can be used:
    • BURN2 chip programmer programs chips
    • ALDU1+CABL1 cable allows laptop to log data with appropriate software
    • Ostrich 2 with SocketBooster allows real time tuning while vehicle is running
    • APU1 / AutoProm programs chips, logs data and allows realtime programming in one unit along with optional wideband logging.
    • TunerPro RT can be used with the $1D (84-85) or $31T /1227148Turbo (86-87) definitions for editing and logging

QuarterHorse – Optoisolator Install and Use

Introduction

On some vehicles, the QH doesn’t work well due to an excessive amount of electrical noise or ground potential differences.  In these cases, the optoisolator module we sell provides electrical isolation between your laptop and the QuarterHorse.  While not a solution to electrical noise issues on the vehicle, it certainly can help.

The main workflow change that this creates is a need to have the QH powered on whenever communicating using the opto cable.  If you need to load a base tune on the bench, you can still plug in to the USB cable directly but you will not have any isolation.  Then again, you shouldn’t need it on the bench.  Please don’t try to have both the Optoisolator interface and the standard USB interface plugged in at once.  It shouldn’t break anything, but it also shouldn’t work.

Install

In order to use the optoisolator interface with the QH, you must solder a 4 pin right angle latching header.  You should have received one with the optoisolator kit.  Email us if you require extra latching pin headers.

First, place the pin header in the QH, oriented as shown here:

 

QH header from top

QH header from top

Viewed from the bottom:

QH header from bottom

QH header from bottom

Next up, solder the 4 pins.

View of completed QH with header for Optoisolator module:

QH with header installed

QH with header installed

Once the header is installed, simply connect the supplied 4 pin latching header between the QH and the optoisolator module.  Plug the USB end of the optoisolator module in your laptop and get back to tuning.  The isolator module uses the same USB drivers as the QH.

 

Ford: “Calibrated” MAFs

Introduction

Calibrated MAFs are something you are almost guaranteed to run into sooner or later tuning EECIV Fords.  Although largely an artifact of yesteryear when tuning tools were not available, “calibrated” MAFs will work just as well as any other if you understand them.  Few of the websites out there will really give you the information you need to use them effectively in current golden age of EECIV tuning.

How They Work

The factory ECM has a table that tells the computer that it has a certain amount of air when there is a particular MAF voltage.  (i.e. “MAF Transfer Function”)  The computer also has a configuration for a set of injectors. (i.e. “high slope / low slope / breakpoint / offset”)  The factory ECM is going to deliver a certain amount of fuel based on the size of the injectors, MAF transfer and amount of air / voltage coming from the MAF.

So pretend for a moment that the ECM is off limits.  You can’t do anything with the MAF transfer function or any of the internal configuration.  But you need to be able to support a larger engine that makes more power than factory 19# injectors can support.  So you install 24# injectors that flow more fuel.  Paired with a stock MAF, 24# injectors are going to make the car run really rich!  Mass air flow (output from MAF transfer) x injector slopes get’s you pulsewidth, pulsewidth determines fuel flow.  You can’t change anything on the computer in this game, so what do you do to fix fueling?

Enter the calibrated MAF.

Say you start with a system that uses 19# injectors and you have installed 24# injectors.  Your injectors flow roughly (24# / 19#) or 1.26 times too much fuel.  What’s the other side of the fueling equation?  Airflow.  If you can make the MAF output 1.26 times LESS air, the net amount of fuel will be about the same as when you have a factory MAF and factory injectors.  “Calibrated MAFs” diddle with the voltage->airflow output of the MAF in order to try and make a factory ECM provide the correct amount of fueling without needing any of its program being altered.  Essentially, hardware modifications to the sampling tube and electrical tweaks are used to produce a specifically reshaped output to fool the ECM into somewhat behaving.

So What Does This Mean?

There is an unintended consequence to using a “Calibrated MAF” setup.  In addition to being used for fueling, the MAF is also used to calculate timing at part throttle.  Less air means less Load.  Less Load generally means more timing at part throttle.  Fortunately, the WOT timing model of factory fox body cars removes most of the danger inherent with changing Load values without changing the rest of the tune.   It’s an imperfect system, at best.  There are generally errors here and there in the airflow curve.  Hopefully, they’re small enough to be corrected by O2 sensors.  Remember, this whole matching calibrated MAF thing dates to when there weren’t tuning options commonly available.

In the golden age of EECIV tuning ushered in by the QuarterHorse, you can make effective changes to the calibration on the ECM, removing the need for MAFs to be “Calibrated” in hardware.  Instead, the quality of MAF calibration will depend on how closely the values you have programmed in the MAF transfer function match the actual airflow values required to produce given voltages.  Being able to independently change the MAF transfer function and injector configuration using our tools removes the need for the “calibration” to be done in hardware and instead lets you do it in software by tuning the vehicle and modifying its calibration.

Bottom line: when tuning with a QuarterHorse, the flow test or flow sheet from the MAF is 100x more important than the MAF being “calibrated” for whatever injectors are being used.  The MAF and injectors can be independently calibrated in tuning software.

References

C+L on Calibrated MAFs

Need more refs…

 

86-88 Ford Fox Body Mustang / DA1 Speed density

Introduction

Early Fox Body Mustangs used a speed-density metering system from 1986-1988.  Uses TFI distributor, 8 injectors, speed-density metering.  This EEC-IV system isn’t as well-supported as the MAF cars that followed but tools are available.

Hardware for Tuning

  • QuarterHorse – integrated device brings unique functionality to the table.  It is a “chip on steroids” that allows you to make changes while the vehicle is running and (with supporting software) log live data from the vehicle.
  • F3 – simple chip module that can store one or two tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.  Requires Jaybird programmer or BURN2+FA.
  • F8 – fancy chip module that can store eight tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.   Can also be programmed while installed – no need to remove chip to reprogram it.  Requires Destiny programmer
  • BURN2 + FA + FE – generic chip programmer with Ford adapter (FA) and ECM interface (FE) that can be used to read the current program from EECIV and EECV ECMs on the bench.

Software for Tuning

Although several different strategies (or “operating systems”) were used on this generation of computer, all of them are capable of using the GUFB (i.e. A9L) code.  This can be downloaded with tuning software so it is not critical to read your own ECM.  This is a very common, well supported application.  Any of the three tuning softwares that we sell will work for this application.  Any tunes developed using a QuarterHorse can be programmed to F3/F8 chips for long term use

  • Binary Editor 2012 ($100 – $171 available from Moates.net) is a Ford-specific graphically oriented tuning software that supports many EEC-IV and EEC-V processors.  There are several options for BE2012:
    • Free built-in definitions for BE2012 come with the software.  They’re reasonably complete and work really well.  Support DA1, DA2, etc.
    • Core Tuning definition ($195 available through Coretuning.Net) – uses same standards for organization as other Core Tuning defs, very complete.
    • EEC Analyzer ($50 available from Moates.net) is an optional companion program to Binary Editor to assist with analyzing data and automating tuning tasks.
  • TunerPro RT ($30 / free available from Moates.net) is a universal tuning software that supports the GUFB strategy editing using definitions available on TunerPro’s website.
  • EEC Editor ($20 or $45 / available from Moates.net) has basic support for the DA1,DA2 mustang ECMs.

Demon II

d2_in_ecu

Introduction / Identification

The Demon2, pictured above, is the newest in our line of Honda/Acura-friendly P28/P30/P72-compatible technology. Flawless realtime emulation, embedded datalogging, auxiliary ports, 16x calibration storage and encryption.   The Demon II is designed to fit inside only USDM ECUs.   If you have a JDM ECU, be sure to let us know when you order so we can supply an original Demon.  The Demon II combines the features of the Ostrich, Hulog, RTP, and adds its own unique feature set.  The Demon II requires software to specifically support many of its features – not all software support is equal.

Ports and Connectivity

The Demon II uses the same FTDI Device drivers as the rest of the products that we sell.  The Demon II has two USB ports – one standard ‘B’ port that is accessible by cutting the ECU case prior to installation and one mini-B port like prior hardware versions.  Plugging a cable from either of these ports to your PC will allow your PC to communicate with the unit.  Please do NOT plug both USB ports in at the same time.
The Demon II supports additional devices through the black 4 pin add-on header.  Some examples of devices that can be used are the TunerView II, TunerView RD1 and BlueTooth serial modules.  ***IMPORTANT***  The original Demon and Demon II **DO NOT** have the same pinout!  It is entirely possible for damage to occur if incorrectly pinned peripherals are plugged in to the Demon II!  Please make sure you have the correct cables to support the hardware you have.  If you have any doubts, please contact us.

If using the 4-pin TTL with devices such as the Demon/Tunerview interface, TunerView RD1, or Bluetooth, be SURE that the pinout is:
Demon2: 1=Gnd , 2=5v supply , 3=Rx in, 4=Tx out

Software Support

As of 5/5/2014 software support is as follows:

Neptune: Full emulation+data+onboard (stable)
ecTune: Emulation+data (stable)
Crome: Emulation+data (some versions)

Please note that each Demon has a serial number – NepTune and eCtune both license a single copy of the software to a single Demon.  The exact procedure for this is different for each software package.

Datalogging Memory

Demon II units have 4Mbyte (32Mbit) memory.  This is enough for several hours of logging at full speed on all channels, with compression turned on.

Switching Between Software

You can now more easily switch among the different applications using our Config Utility for resetting the state of your Demon.

Indicator Lights

Light behavior on the Demon II is the same as the 1.9+ Demon firmware.

The red LED serves as a hardware status indicator and/or busy light.

  • Red light on solid = not receiving power from the ECU: physical connection issue to ECU
  • Red LED will blink when logging packets are being captured

The green LED is more of a data packet and status indicator light.  It typically behaves as follows:

  • Solid green light when the Demon is powered on and all systems are go but no packets are being received
  • Green light is off when the device is busy OR Demon is powered off
  • Fast green blinks mean the Demon is receiving good datalogging packets from the ECU.

Troubleshooting:

  • Red light onwith USB plugged in means the Demon is NOT receiving power from the ECU.
    • You will only see this condition when the Demon is being powered by USB
    • Check 28 pin socket bridge pins and connection
    • Check ECU CN2 – 4 pin port connection.  This is REQUIRED for proper Demon operation
  • Green light off means no power to ECU.  Red on / green off is expected with no power.
  • No lights at all when USB is plugged in generally is a fault condition.
    • Try removing the Demon from the ECU.  If the Red light comes on, check the chipping job and physical connections between the Demon and the ECU

Credit Card Processing 101

Introduction

Lately, we’ve been having a lot more trouble with Credit Card verification.  We’re not sure whether this is because there are more people trying to do fraudulent things (in which case, this would be good trouble) or whether it is because legitimate customers are having trouble getting their cards verified.  While sometimes inconvenient, please understand that credit card verification schemes exist to protect you from fraud.

How Credit Card Processing Works at Moates

  1. When you click “Submit” on the website to send us your order, your computer sends your information to us over an encrypted connection.
  2. Our website sends the information you have sent to our merchant service to AUTHORIZE (or pre-auth) your card.  (Important: your credit card information exists on our servers long enough to receive it and transmit it to our Merchant Service.  We do NOT log, store or otherwise keep a record of credit cards in any shape or form.)
  3. The Merchant Service checks your CARD NUMBER, EXPIRATION DATE, BILLING ADDRESS and CVV2 / VERIFICATION CODE versus the information that the card issuer has on file.  
  4. If the information provided by you matches the information on file, the merchant service proceeds to place a PRE-AUTHORIZATION (hold) on the card for the amount requested.
  5. This PRE-AUTHORIZATION is not an actual charge. This simply places a hold on funds in order to cover a real transaction, should it actually happen. On many online banking sites, these show up as a “Pending charge.”
  6. As part of the process of picking your order, packing it and shipping it out we also complete the PRE-AUTHORIZATION, turning it into a CHARGE.  Bottom line: until a human being manually completes the order, we do not receive any of your money.
  7. Authorizations that are not completed into transactions will generally go away on their own in 24-72 hours.  We do NOT have control over the speed at which authorizations fall off your card – this is controlled by your card issuing authority, not us.  We can’t remove an authorization from your card – we can only affect CHARGES

My Card Didn’t Verify?  What Can I do?

  1. DO NOT KEEP SUBMITTING THE SAME ORDER OVER AND OVER.  If it didn’t work once, it’s not going to work a second time unless you fix the issue.  If you keep submitting an order repeatedly without changing anything, you are likely to create lots of bogus pending charges/pre-auths on your card.
  2. DOUBLE CHECK YOUR BILLING ADDRESS!!!  The most common issue with cards being declined is the billing address information not matching what your card issuer has on file.  In most cases, we can ship to a different address but we MUST have your correct billing address in order to process the order
  3. DOUBLE CHECK YOUR CVV2 CODE!!!  The second most common issue with card verification is an incorrect CVV2 code, which is the 3 or 4 digit code on the back of the card.  Your card will not process without this information.
  4. DOUBLE CHECK YOUR CARD NUMBER AND EXPIRATION!!!  Your card will not process unless this data is correct.
  5. USE PAYPAL.  If you have PayPal, you can use it to pay.  PayPal often can use your card for payment even when we have issues with it because of the more involved verification procedure that is required to get an account.
  6. HAVE US CONTACT YOU.  If you are 100% convinced that your card information is correct and PayPal is not an option for you, call or email us and we can look into things further for you.

93 Corvette / Camaro LT1 16159278

Introduction

The 1993 Camaro / Corvette LT1 PCM 16159278 is an oddball.  It was not used before or since.  The $DA2 mask was used in Y-body Corvettes and the $DA3 mask was used in F-body Camaro/Firebirds.

Hardware for Tuning

  • G1 Chip adapter and C2 27SF512 chip required to reprogram ECM
  • BURN2 Chip Programmer programs 27SF512 chips
  • ALDU1 with CABL1 required for datalogging
  • Ostrich2 required for real time tuning
  • APU1 AutoPROM All-in-one device works great, taking the place of BURN2, ALDU1+CABL1 and Ostrich2

Software for Tuning

These computers use the $DA2 or DA3 masks from the factory.  The $DA2 mask was used in Y-body Corvettes and the $DA3 mask was used in F-body Camaro/Firebirds.

TunerPro RT + the $DA2 or $DA3 definitions works for editing and datalogging.  (this is the recommended software.  It is included with the AutoProm)

TunerCat OBD1 tuner with the appropriate definition works for editing.

TTS Datamaster with the appropriate definition works for datalogging.

Recommended Hardware to Buy

  1. G1 + BURN2 + C2 = most basic
  2. G1 + BURN2 + C2 + ALDU1 w/ CABL1 = basic with logging capabilities
  3. G1 + APU1 = Chip tune / realtime tune / datalog – full capabilities
  4. G1 + APU1 + MTX-L = full capabilites with wideband logging

92-95 TBI Trucks with 4L60E and 4L80E transmissions 16197427 16196395 16156930 16168625

Introduction

Starting around 1992, GM started putting the newer electronically controlled 4L60E and 4L80E transmissions in their trucks.  Along with the electronically controlled transmissions came new ECMs that speak ALDL at 8192 baud and have removable “memcals” – 16197427, 16196395, 16156930, 16168625.  These ECMs are largely interchangeable – as a rule of thumb, any of the 4 hardware boxes ( 16197427, 16196395, 16156930, 16168625 ) can run any of the 4 main masks ( $0D, $0E, $31 or $E6 ) BUT you will have issues using a V6 memcal for a V8 application or vise versa.  Your memcal MUST be from a vehicle that has the same number of cylinders as the engine you are trying to run.

Hardware for Tuning

  • G1 Chip adapter and C2 27SF512 chip required to reprogram ECM
  • BURN2 Chip Programmer programs 27SF512 chips
  • ALDU1 with CABL1 required for datalogging
  • Ostrich2 required for real time tuning
  • APU1 AutoPROM All-in-one device works great, taking the place of BURN2, ALDU1+CABL1 and Ostrich2

Software for Tuning

These computers use the $0D, $0E, $31 or $E6 masks from the factory.  The $0D and $E6 are generally found on 4L60E trucks.  The $31 and $0E are generally found on 4L80E equipped trucks.

TunerPro RT + the $0D, $0E, $31 or $E6 definitions works for editing and datalogging.  (this is the recommended software.  It is included with the AutoProm)

TunerCat OBD1 tuner with the appropriate definition works for editing.

TTS Datamaster with the appropriate definition works for datalogging.

Recommended Hardware to Buy

  1. G1 + BURN2 + C2 = most basic
  2. G1 + BURN2 + C2 + ALDU1 w/ CABL1 = basic with logging capabilities
  3. G1 + APU1 = Chip tune / realtime tune / datalog – full capabilities
  4. G1 + APU1 + MTX-L = full capabilites with wideband logging

OBD1 BMWs – what you need

Introduction

OBD1 BMWs are an example of how our products get used for applications that we never intended.  Many of our tools are “generic” chip burning and emulation tools that target a type (or types) of EPROMs and will work with just about any computer that uses the same kind of chip.  Most of these BMW ECUs use either 27C32, 27C256 or 27C512 EPROMs.  These ECUs can be tuned using the same tools that we originally intended for GMs ( G2 0.6″ chip adapter, BURN2, SST27SF512 chip, Ostrich 2.0).  At some point, TunerPro definitions became available for these computers, which opened things up for enthusiasts to more easily tune them.  Someone figured out that the address trace feature of the Ostrich2 could be a useful tool for tuning these vehicles.  And here we are…

Loosely speaking, this range of ECU appears to be in the 1985-1995 range.

Disclaimer

We don’t know much about these applications.  We noticed that a lot of people were using our tools for these vehicles and asked enough questions to figure out what was going on and where the necessary software was coming from.  We aren’t going to be able to give you any help tuning these ECUs.  We aren’t going to be able to give you much help with definitions.  We don’t have any contacts or secrets to help you.  The expertise and recommendations we can give are very much limited to publicly available tools you could probably find yourself with a little creative use of search engines.

What You Need

Hardware-wise, these ECUs use standard EPROMs.  Most that I’ve seen have a socketed EPROM, meaning that you can remove the chip without having to desolder it from the board.

  • Most early ECUs have 27C32 or 27C64 EPROMs which are 24 pin.
    • Most of our tools are intended for 28 pin EPROMs.  We do not sell tools to erase or reprogram 24 pin chips.
    • To use any of our chip programming tools, you will need to desolder the factory socket and solder in a G2 0.6″ chip adapter, at which point you will be able to use 28 pin chips like the 27SF512
    • You can use the Ostrich2 emulator.  The Ostrich supports native 24 pin operation (with 4 pins of its cable hanging off) and also works with a G2.  You may be able to get away with using the EMUC2806 (6″ cable) instead of the 18″ we normally supply or the SocketBooster 1.0 can be used to ensure reliable operation.
  • Most later ECUs have 27C256 or 27C512 EPROMs which are 28 pin.
    • Most of these ECUs are socketed.  You can remove the factory EPROM and replace it with the 27SF512 we sell using the BURN2 to program it.
    • These ECUs are a direct-fit for the Ostrich2
  • We do NOT offer any tools for datalogging on these ECUs.  A very limited amount of data can be gathered using the “trace” feature of the Ostrich2, which lets you see which data in a ROM is being actively accessed.  There is NO history or logging of trace, only immediate feedback.

Software-wise, we are only aware of TunerPro RT being used with these ECUs.  TunerPro RT supports the BURN2 and Ostrich2 hardware natively.  TunerPro does NOT work with all vehicles.  You should consult the TunerPro Definitions page to see if an XDF exists for your particular ECU before purchasing any hardware.  We will not be able to help make a definition for your ECU if one does not already exist.

Ford: Strategies supported

Introduction

Although you can use our Ford hardware ( F3 Jaybird QuarterHorse ) on just about any 86-2004 Ford, software is much more lacking.  Currently (Feb 28 2014) there are three software packages that support our Ford hardware – Binary Editor, EEC Editor, TunerPro RT.  Each software package has a different set of computers that it works with although there is quite a bit of overlap on more popular strategies.  For the most part, US and Australian ECMs are best supported – European models are quite lacking in comparison.

Note that most of the information about software support will deal with STRATEGIES not processor codes.  We have a box code-strategy cross reference.  If you don’t see your box code listed there, we will generally be able to help you figure out which strategy your ECM uses most of the time from its box code – send an email to support@moates.net.  Worst case, you will have to read the stock computer (with QuarterHorse or F2E ) and email us the binary.

The following information is REASONABLY up to date as of Feb 28, 2014.  (I will try to update it periodically)

EEC Editor – Supported Strategies

The best way to find out what strategies are supported by EEC Editor is to download and install it!  After you have updated the software, you can see all supported strategies by looking in the directory “C:Program FilesEEC Editordefinitions”  which contains a file for each strategy EEC Editor can open and edit.  You can see which strategies support datalogging with the QuarterHorse by looking at the directory “C:Program FilesEEC Editordlms”  Please download the software and play with your computer’s definition / DLM prior to purchase as not all strategies are equally complete.  All of these strategies are available through Moates.net

There is also an excel spreadsheet which may be very helpful for determining if there is support for your vehicle. This spreadsheet has more accurate information than this web page.

Supported strategies:

1990F250.DEF (edit only)
1DDB.DEF (edit only)
1deb.def (edit AND datalog)
1dec.DEF (edit only)
1dga.def (edit only)
2dbd.def (edit only)
2dca.DEF (edit only)
2dda.DEF (edit only)
3dea.def (edit only)
a9u2.def (edit only)
AGANF.def (edit only)
AKAM9.def (edit only)
akama.def (edit only)
AKAMH.def (edit only)
akc0.DEF (edit only)
AOAG3.def (edit only)
ATAN0.def (edit only)
bnaf9.DEF (edit only)
boae4.def (edit only)
c3p2.def (edit only)
C3W1.DEF (edit only)
cbaz0.def (edit only)
cbaza.def (edit AND datalog)
CCAQA.def (edit only)
CCAQE.def (edit only)
CDAN4.def (edit only)
CDAN6.def (edit only)
CDAP3.def (edit only)
cdba4.def (edit only)
cfak7.DEF (edit only)
cmai3.def (edit only)
cmai7.def (edit only)
cmai9.def (edit only)
cmba0.def (edit only)
CNAB0.def (edit only)
CNAB1.def (edit only)
cqab1.def (edit only)
crai8.def (edit only)
CRAIA.def (edit only)
CRAIB.def (edit only)
CRAIC.def (edit only)
craj0.DEF (edit only)
ctbae.def (edit only)
cvae6.DEF (edit only)
cvae7.DEF (edit only)
CVAF1.def (edit only)
cvba0.DEF (edit only)
cvba2.DEF (edit only)
d9s.DEF (edit only)
DA1.def (edit AND datalog)
GVAKA.def (edit only)
gvakb.def (edit only)
gufa.def (edit AND datalog)
gufb.def (edit AND datalog)
gufc.DEF (edit AND datalog)
gure.def (edit AND datalog)
hug02.DEF (edit only)
HWAD3.DEF (edit only)
icy1.def (edit only)
kmak6.def (edit only)
kqad2.DEF (edit only)
kraf5.def (edit only)
LA3.def (edit only)
LB3.DEF (edit only)
m2y.def (edit only)
maag4.DEF (edit only)
MMAH0.def (edit only)
MPAM1.def (edit only)
mrad2.DEF (edit only)
mrad3.DEF (edit only)
odal1.DEF (edit only)
ODAL1.def (edit only)
OMAD3.def (edit only)
OMAD4.def (edit only)
OMAE1.def (edit only)
OMAE2.def (edit only)
p2y0.def (edit AND datalog)
PCAG2.def (edit only)
PCAG6.def (edit only)
pf3.def (edit only)
pybd3.DEF (edit only)
pycl5.def (edit only)
PYCL7.def (edit only)
QAAC5.def (edit only)
qbaa0.DEF (edit only)
rbadb.def (edit only)
rbaed.DEF (edit only)
REAC3.def (edit only)
reac4.DEF (edit only)
RGAF2.def (edit only)
rhagb.def (edit only)
RQAD6.def (edit only)
rtai0.DEF (edit only)
rtai1.def (edit only)
rtaj0.DEF (edit only)
RVAF1.def (edit only)
RVAF3.DEF (edit only)
rvafa.DEF (edit only)
rvafb.DEF (edit only)
rvai1.DEF (edit only)
RWAI2.def (edit only)
ryae0.def (edit only)
RYAF0.def (edit only)
RYAF1.def (edit AND datalog)
ryak1.DEF (edit only)
RYBE2.def (edit only)
RZAN0.def (edit only)
RZAO1.def (edit only)
rzao2.def (edit only)
RZASA.def (edit only)
rzaso.def (edit only)
tauf0.DEF (edit only)
VET1.DEF (edit only)
way1.def (edit only)
X2S2.def (edit only)

Binary Editor Supported Strategies

The best way to find out if your strategy is supported in Binary Editor is to download the software and install it!  Let it update itself.  It should download the latest and greatest strategies available.   You can also take a look at the strategies download page at EECAnalyzer.net for more information. Strategies are stored in “C:\Program Files\Binary Editor\DEF” in a unique folder for each definition.

Please note: datalogging and editing are controlled by the same definition file in BE.  You will have to load the definition along with a tune file to get an accurate idea of what exactly is supported.

Please also note: some definitions (that end in “.xls”) can be used by anyone with the software.  Other strategy files (those with the “.cry” extension) require additional registration with their author to use them. Derek Fenwick is a particularly excellent strategy author to look for.

Supported Strategies:

(This list last updated 2/15/11 – check http://www.eecaalyzer.net for an updated list)
AHACA (free)GUF1 (free)
GUFA (free)
GUFB (free)
GURE (free)
LA (free)
LA3 (free)
LB2 (free)
LUX0 (free)
PCAF5 (free)
PE (free)

(this information was gathered from looking at http://www.eecanalyzer.net/index.php/strategies-calibrations)

Binary Editor – Core Tuning Strategies:

Core Tuning offer definitions for some of the popular EECIV and EECV strategies which are not publicly available otherwise. You can purchase them from www.coretuning.net. Almost all of the 1996-2004 Mustang GT, Cobra, and Lightning strategies are covered here. As of the time of writing (2/15/11) these strategies are offered:
AGANN
AGANF
AHACA
C3P3/C3P2/ICY1
CBAZA
CDAN3
CDAN4
CRAI8
CRAJ0
CVAE6
CVAE7
CVAF1
CVBA0
CZAJL
FBFG2
FBGI0
MRAD2
MRAD3
OMAD3
OMAD4
OMAE1
RTAJ0
RVAF1
RVAFA
RVAFB
RYAF0
RYAF1
RYAK1
RYBE2
TAUF0

Binary Editor – Derek Fenwick’s definitions

1DEB – Australian EB series 5.0l XR8
1DGA – Australian EB series 5.0l XR8
2DCA – Australian EB series 5.0l
A4A1 – 94 Lincoln Towncar
AHACB – covers a variety of trucks, e.g. VEX1, WAY1. HOG0
ANY1 – covers a variety 4.0L ’93/94 Explorers and Rangers
C1A1 – ’92/93 2.3L Mustang (C1A1 and D1L1 catch codes)
CAW0 – ’91/94 F series TCM (CAW0 catch code)
CBAZ0 – ’94/95 5.0L trucks and 3.8L Thunderbirds
CBAZA – ’94/95 5.0L Mustangs
CCAQA – ’94/95 4.6L Thunderbird, Cougar and 3.8L Mustang
CCAQE – ’94/95 4.6L Thunderbird, Cougar and 3.8L Mustang
CDAN4 – ’96/97 4.6L Mustang, Thunderbird, Cougar, Grand Marquis, Crown Victoria, Towncar and 3.8L Mustang, Thunderbird, Cougar
CDAN6 – ’96/97 4.6L Grand Marquis, Crown Victoria, Towncar
CNAB1 – ’98 4.6L F series
CZAJL – Lincoln Mk VIII
CZAW0 – ’94/95 3.8L Thunderbird
DC – ’87 5.0L Mustang (DC and DE catch codes)
GHAJ0 – 2.0L Escort Cosworth
GSALC – ’91 3.8L and 5.0L Thunderbird
GSALI – ’92/93 3.8L and 5.0L Thunderbird
GURE ’89/90 3.8L Thunderbird, Cougar
LHBL0 – ’93/96 covers a variety of Lightnings and other trucks
LHBL1 – covers some trucks (e.g. P2Y0 catch code)
LHBL2 – covers some trucks (e.g. ALT0 catch code)
LUX0 – ’87’88 5.0L Mustang
NVAF91 – a variety of Australian EF series 5.0L
NVMG84 – a variety of Australian EL series 5.0L
NVMG85 – a variety of Australian EL series 5.0L

To purchase a registration to use any of these definition files for Binary Editor contact sailorbob@uk2.net
be sure to include your machine code from Binary Editor’s Register >> Strategy Menu, type the “Strategy Name” just as its listed above
in the “Name of creator of the Strategy file” type in “Derek” with no quotations.

Strategy files are $25 each and gives you the ability to tune an unlimited amount of vehicles with that ECU strategy.

TunerPro / TunerPro RT Supported Strategies

One way to find out if your strategy is supported by TunerPro / TunerPro RT is to look at the list of supported definitions.  TunerPro supports the QuarterHorse as of version 5.0 which has been released as of the time of writing but QH and strategy support lags considerably behind EEC Editor and Binary Editor.  There is extremely solid support for GUFB (A9L / Fox body) and CBAZA (T4M0 / J4J1 / 94-95 Mustang). You can download the TPRT5 specific files here from our site.

Australian EEC Support list

Tuner Pro seems to be the weapon of choice for most Australian EECs.  You can get more info and an updated list of supported cars, box codes and strategies here:

Australian EECs : http://www.tiperformance.com.au/technical.html

96-97 Mustang 3.8L, 4.6L 2V GT, 4.6L 4V Cobra, Town Car, Thunderbird, etc.: CDAN4 Strategy

Introduction

These processors use EDIS coil packs backed by a 36-1 crank trigger wheel, sequential injection for up to 8 injectors, MAF air metering and an electronically controlled 4R70W 4 speed automatic transmission or Tremec 5 speed manual.  These mod motor ECMs speak the standard OBD2 which opens up options for logging using a standard scantool over the diagnostic port.  The CDAN4 strategy used by these processors was used to run almost all RWD engines offered by Ford in 1996 and 1997 – 3.8L V6 in Thunderbird and mustang base model, 4.6L 2V V8 in Mustang GT, Town car, grand marquis, thunderbird, 4.6L 4V in Mustang Cobra.

Hardware for Tuning

  • QuarterHorse – integrated device brings unique functionality to the table.  It is a “chip on steroids” that allows you to make changes while the vehicle is running and (with supporting software) log live data from the vehicle.
  • F3 – simple chip module that can store one or two tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.  Requires Jaybird programmer or BURN2+FA.
  • F8 – fancy chip module that can store eight tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.   Can also be programmed while installed – no need to remove chip to reprogram it.  Requires Destiny programmer
  • BURN2 + FA + FE – generic chip programmer with Ford adapter (FA) and ECM interface (FE) that can be used to read the current program from EECIV and EECV ECMs on the bench.

Software for Tuning

The CDAN4 strategy is very common in 96-97 vehicles as it is used on almost all of the RWD platform, both automatic and manual transmission.  Many base bin files for stock vehicles can be downloaded with tuning software, but there are a lot of applications where bin files are not available.  Plan on using the QuarterHorse or BURN2+FA+FE to read your own ECM.  Any of the three tuning softwares that we sell will work for this application.  Any tunes developed using a QuarterHorse can be programmed to F3/F8 chips for long term use.  Definitions for this platform vary in quality a TON!!!  Some support full automatic transmission control in addition to allowing engine parameters to be modified.  Some barely have the basics of engine operation.

  • Binary Editor 2012 ($100 – $171 available from Moates.net) is a Ford-specific graphically oriented tuning software that supports many EEC-IV and EEC-V processors.  There are several definition options for BE2012:
    • Core Tuning Definition ($195 available through Coretuning.net) – comprehensive definition with editing of engine and transmission parameters and full datalogging with QH.
    • Dex’s definition ($25 email sailorbob@uk2.net) – I haven’t seen this in order to review it, although Dex’s stuff is generally very, very good.
  • EEC Analyzer ($50 available from Moates.net) is an optional companion program to Binary Editor to assist with analyzing data and automating tuning tasks.
  • TunerPro RT ($30 / free available from Moates.net) is a universal tuning software that supports the CDAN4 strategy editing using definitions available on TunerPro’s website. 
    • The available definition does NOT have datalogging support.  Comprehensiveness questionable.
  • EEC Editor ($30 / $35 available from Moates.net) is a Ford-specific tuning software that supports the CDAN4 strategy with full QuarterHorse editing and logging.  
    • Datalogging and editing definitions available.  Completeness unknown.

Recommended Combos

Just want to know what to buy?  All of these will be valid combos that will allow you to tune a vehicle effectively.

(Ford Dealer Kit + Core Tuning Commercial Tuning Package)

(QuarterHorse AND Jaybird AND F3 AND Binary Editor 2012 WITH Dongle AND Core Tuning Premium Definition AND Innovate MTX wideband AND Keyspan USB->Serial)

(QuarterHorse AND Jaybird AND F3 AND Binary Editor 2012 AND Dex Definition AND Innovate MTX wideband AND Keyspan USB->Serial)

(Jaybird AND F3 AND TunerPro RT)

94-95 Mustang 302 V8: CBAZA / T4M0 / W4H0 / etc.

Introduction

These processors use a TFI distributor, sequential injection for up to 8 injectors, MAF air metering and an electronically controlled AOD-E 4 speed automatic transmission or Tremec 5 speed manual.  This EEC-IV system became the blueprint for future Ford systems (EECV and beyond) for years to come.  The 94 Mustang with its CBAZA strategy is arguably the first “modern” Ford processor, at least in the sense that the same thinking and algorithms for fueling, spark and transmission control are used to the present day.  Initially hindered by a lack of datalogging capabilities, this platform has been able to truly shine with the help of Moates tuning tools.

Hardware for Tuning

  • QuarterHorse – integrated device brings unique functionality to the table.  It is a “chip on steroids” that allows you to make changes while the vehicle is running and (with supporting software) log live data from the vehicle.
  • F3 – simple chip module that can store one or two tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.  Requires Jaybird programmer or BURN2+FA.
  • F8 – fancy chip module that can store eight tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.   Can also be programmed while installed – no need to remove chip to reprogram it.  Requires Destiny programmer
  • BURN2 + FA + FE – generic chip programmer with Ford adapter (FA) and ECM interface (FE) that can be used to read the current program from EECIV and EECV ECMs on the bench.

Software for Tuning

CBAZA is the strategy used by 94-95 V8 Mustangs, both automatic and manual transmission.  Base bin files from stock vehicles can be downloaded with tuning software so it is not critical to read your own ECM.  Most definitions support full transmission control in addition to allowing engine parameters to be modified.  This is a very common, established, well supported application.  Any of the three tuning softwares that we sell will work for this application.  Any tunes developed using a QuarterHorse can be programmed to F3/F8 chips for long term use.

  • Binary Editor 2012 is a Ford-specific graphically oriented tuning software that supports many EEC-IV and EEC-V processors.  The CBAZA strategy has full editing and logging support using the QuarterHorse.  There are both free and pay versions of the CBAZA strategy.
  • TunerPro RT is a universal tuning software that supports the CBAZA strategy with full QuarterHorse editing and logging using the definitions on this site.
  • EEC Editor is a Ford-specific tuning software that supports the CBAZA strategy with full QuarterHorse editing and logging.

Recommended Combos

Just want to know what to buy?  All of these will be valid combos that will allow you to tune a vehicle effectively.

(Ford Dealer Kit)

(QuarterHorse AND Jaybird AND F3 AND Binary Editor 2012 AND Innovate MTX wideband AND Keyspan USB->Serial)

(QuarterHorse AND Jaybird AND F3 AND TunerPro RT AND Innovate MTX wideband)

96-97 Corvette, Camaro, Firebird, Impala, Caprice, etc.16214399 and 16242921

Introduction

The 96-97 F and Y bodies use a unique PCM that is an evolution of the 94-95 ECM but requires unique tools.  They are primarily tuned by reflash using the ALDL protocol over the diagnostic port, NOT by programming and replacing chips.  (Although this is theoretically possible)  They are MAP sensor based.

Hardware for Tuning

  • TunerCat OBD2 Tuner with reflash cable

Software for Tuning

The only package capable of tuning these vehicles available from Moates is the TunerCat OBD2 tuner suite with WinFlash.

Alternatives / Discussion

It will cost about $900 to get into the TunerCat OBD2 package.  There are worthwhile alternatives:

  • Convert to a 94-95 ECM that is well-supported by TunerCATS OBD1.  This will require an ALDU1+CABL2 comboTunerCATS OBD1 tuner ($69.95) with a single definition file ($EE – $19.95) ORTunerCats WinFLash and TunerPro RT with the $EE definition, along with a new 94-95 ECM.  This may involve minor wiring changes.  Arguably the most simple and straightforward option.  Preserves all engine sensors, distributor, etc.  This option will work for LTx engines ONLY.  96-97 Vortecs must use another option.
  • Convert to a 98+ ECM that is well-supported by EFI Live.  This will involve more substantial wiring changes and a supported 98+ ECM.  This will involve a 24x reluctor conversion kit. (See here for more information.)  This is *NOT EASY OR SIMPLE* but arguably provides the best solution because quality, trusted LSx electronics replace many problematic parts on the earlier engines such as replacing  the Optispark system with coil-near-plug as found on the LSx.

94-95 LT1 Corvette, Camaro, Firebird 16188051 16181333

Introduction

The 94-95 F and Y bodies are a dramatically different breed of PCM compared to earlier models used by GM.  They are primarily tuned by reflash using the ALDL protocol over the diagnostic port, NOT by programming and replacing chips.  (Although this is possible – they feature two 28F512 PLCC EPROMs)  They speak ALDL for datalogging at 8192 baud.  They are MAP sensor based.  BEWARE: these vehicles came with both the rectangular OBD1 style ALDL connectors AND the D-shaped “OBD2″ connector, depending on their build date.  Make sure you check to see which connector your car has before ordering.  ( more )

Hardware for Tuning

  • ALDU1 with CABL1 or CABL2 depending on build date to reprogram ECM and log data
  • APU1 AutoPROM with CABL1 or CABL2 All-in-one device works in pass through mode.  Advanced features of the APU1 including emulation and wideband datalogging are not trivially possible on this platform.

Software for Tuning

These computers use the $EE mask.

TunerPro RT + the $EE definitions works for editing bins and datalogging.  TunerPro can log data.  TunerPro can edit bins.  TunerPro CANNOT read or flash ECMs.

TunerCat OBD1 Tuner with the $EE Definition works for editing bins.  TunerCat OBD1 Tuner can read and flash ECMs and edit bins but not log data.

TTS Datamaster works for logging data but cannot read, flash or edit.

TunerCat WinFlash can be used for the actual work of flashing and reading ECMs but will not log or edit.

Madtuner.com offer an alternative flash program which can be used for the actual work of flashing and reading ECMs but will not log or edit.

So… There is NOT a single software package that does everything you need.  You will need a combination of software packages to be able to read, program, edit and log.

Current Class Schedule

We Do Classes!

We’re starting to offer classes on a more regular basis.  We’ll do our best to keep this page updated with all planned classes.

Future Events

Learn EEC-IV Ford Tuning – Cincinnati, OH – weekend of September 26th, 2014

Learn EEC-IV Ford Tuning – Baton Rouge, LA – weekend of October 11th, 2014

Past Events

Learn Nismotronic for Nissan – Carlisle, PA – May 23-25, 2014

Learn EEC-IV Ford Tuning – Baton Rouge, LA – November 2013

Learn EEC-IV Ford Tuning - Cincinnnati, OH – October 2013

Learn EEC-IV Ford Tuning - New Orleans, LA – April 2013

Tuning Nissans with Nismotronic – May 2014 Carlisle, PA

A New Class!

We are trying out a new class for 2014 – a 3 day class centered around Nissan vehicles using the Nismotronic product.  The class will feature two days of classroom instruction and one day of hands-on dyno instruction.  The class will be held at J-K Tuning in Carlisle, PA May 23-25, 2014.

Cost

SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY RATE for the class will be $250.   You can pay with any of the methods that we accept on the website (Paypal, Credit Card) in advance or pay cash/money order at the door.  If you’re going to pay at the door, we ask that you purchase the class item from our website and select “Check or Money order” at checkout so we can keep an accurate headcount and reserve your spot.  All of the products that are used for the class will be available for purchase at/after the event at a discount for attendees. You can register for the event here.

Class Overview

Dave Blundell (Moates tech support, NEMU hardware engineer, independent tuner) will be the instructor.   Craig Moates (founder and chief engineer at Moates),  John Kerr (lead Nismotronic developer, tuner) and Dave Dunn (TunerCode developer) will be on hand to assist.

Registration will be limited to 15 people in order to keep the class manageable and give everyone a chance to get involved and ask questions.  There will be a mixture of classroom instruction, live in-car demonstration of logging techniques with street driving and dyno tuning and techniques.  Forced induction and naturally aspirated modifications and tuning will be covered.  We expect lots of discussion and have built time for this into the class schedule.

The class will begin with a day of examining engines and engine management concepts and vocabulary in general.  It will continue with an in-depth look at specifics of the 89-93 S13 and B13 Nissan 4 cylinder vehicles which are the target of the Nismotronic product. (i.e. SR20DET and KA24 powered 240SX, SR20DE powered sentras)  The operation of a stock Nissan ECU will be explored in detail as a foundation for understanding the operation of the system.  Both MAF and speed density tuning with Nismotronic will be covered along with differences between tuning Nismotronic and tuning “pure” factory ECUs.

The class will conclude with a hands-on look at tuning of (at least) two example cars, one high-horsepower blow-through-MAF car and one speed density conversion.  Tips, techniques and approaches for using the system to achieve results will be demonstrated on the dyno.

 

Schedule of Events

Day 1 (TBA) will focus on general theory of how engines work, how electronic engine management works and general approaches to calibration of engine management systems.  Chances are, if you’ve been tuning cars for five years you probably already know a lot of this stuff but it probably wouldn’t hurt you to sit through it again.  If you’re new to engine management, expect your brain to hurt.  The goal of day one is to help you understand how the many pieces of engines, electronics and sensors that you will be dealing with fit together – the big picture.  Most of this day will NOT deal with Nissan specific terms and methods.  At the end of the day, you should have a strong understanding of spark ignition internal combustion engines, how and why engines make power, be able to name and explain the function of sensors likely to be found on a fuel injected engine and understand the conditions needed for achieving specific goals such as fuel economy, power or keeping and engine in one piece.  If you’ve previously worked with other systems of engine management, you might look at what you already know in a new light.  We would really like you to attend this, even if you think you don’t need to.  If you really want to skip it, contact us before hand.

Day 2 (TBA) will begin by focusing on “pure” Nissan engine management.  This is the foundation on which Nismotronic is built.  After lunch break, we will have a Nismotronic install fest to ensure everyone is up and running with the latest version of the software and drivers.  We will continue with a talk-through of the changes in Nismotronic compared to a “pure” Nissan ECU and then continue with a “walk-through” of a previous tune done with the software in order to demonstrate the use of logging and tuning.

Day 3 (TBA) will focus on hands-on usage of Nismotronic.  We will be demonstrating non-trivial tunes with Nismotronic for both MAF and speed-density vehicles.  Datalogging, tuning and incorporating dyno feedback will be a part of the day’s work.  Students will be encouraged to try their hand at making runs, observing data and making targeted changes in order to achieve a result.

Plan on 8-10 hours of being focused per day.  We’ll typically run on a 9ish-6ish kind of day depending on how things go.  (Local time is Eastern Standard Time – EST)

There will be lunch, snacks and drinks provided.  At previous classes, we had an optional group dinner afterwards that worked out well.  Some of the best discussion ended up coming up over dinner, so we’ll probably try to do that again.

We’ll try to have a good chunk of the curriculum up here on the support site prior to the class for you to review and prepare.

Travel Information

Carlisle, PA is home to many car events.  There are numerous Hotels in the area.  We will update this page with some suggestions.

Other Class Opportunities

Check out the support site for other opportunities to take a class on using Moates products.

Ford EFI Tuning Class – Fall 2014 Cincinnati, OH

Another Fall Class!

We are going to be offering a three-day class on tuning Fords with QuarterHorse in Fall 2014 – September 26 to September 29th.  This is the same format class previously offered.  Street tuning and dyno instruction will take place on a dyno in the Fairfield, OH (northwest suburb of Cincinnati).

Cost

Registration for the class will be $350.   You can pay with any of the methods that we accept on the website (Paypal, Credit Card) in advance or pay cash/money order at the door.  If you’re going to pay at the door, we ask that you purchase the class item from our website and select “Check or Money order” at checkout so we can keep an accurate headcount and reserve your spot.  All of the products that are used for the class will be available for purchase at/after the event at a discount for attendees. You can register for the event here.

Class Overview

Dave Blundell, Moates tech support and former tuner at Modular Depot will be the instructor.

Registration will be limited to 15 people in order to keep the class manageable and give everyone a chance to get involved and ask questions.  There will be a mixture of classroom instruction, live in-car demonstration of logging techniques with street driving and dyno tuning and techniques.  Forced induction and naturally aspirated modifications and tuning will be covered.  We expect lots of discussion and have built time for this into the class schedule.

Primary focus will be on 89-95 (i.e. Fox-body Mustang, 94-95 Mustang) EEC-IV MAF Fords but much of the material will carry to later models also supported by the same hardware and software. This class is aimed at beginner-intermediate users, but those with literally no experience at all may want to look at some of the material in advance in order to be better prepared.  Likewise, if you have years of experience with Ford EFI tuning and you’re simply looking to get familiar with using our products for the EEC-IV platform, you should already be familiar with some of the material presented.  We cover everything from physical engine operation to air metering methods to Ford implementations with a goal of helping you make targeted tuning changes and not just “button mashing.”

Schedule of Events

Day 1 (TBA) will focus on general theory of how engines work, how electronic engine management works and general approaches to calibration of engine management systems.  Chances are, if you’ve been tuning cars for five years you probably already know a lot of this stuff but it probably wouldn’t hurt you to sit through it again.  If you’re new to engine management, expect your brain to hurt.  The goal of day one is to help you understand how the many pieces of engines, electronics and sensors that you will be dealing with fit together – the big picture.  Most of this day will NOT deal with Ford specific terms and methods.  At the end of the day, you should have a strong understanding of spark ignition internal combustion engines, how and why engines make power, be able to name and explain the function of sensors likely to be found on a fuel injected engine and understand the conditions needed for achieving specific goals such as fuel economy, power or keeping and engine in one piece.  If you’ve previously worked with other systems of engine management, you might look at what you already know in a new light.

Day 2 (TBA) will focus on early Ford engine management.  If you need to get any software set up and configured, we’ll take care of it on this day.  The morning session will focus on Ford specific terms and procedures for running an engine.  The emphasis will be on the most common and important parameters necessary for adjustment.   Fuel, spark, idle and limits will be covered as well as some of the limitations and pitfalls of using factory computers.  Both forced induction and naturally aspirated setups will be discussed.  After lunch, we will demonstrate setting up Moates hardware and how TunerPro RT and Binary Editor 2012 software can be used to make adjustments necessary for tuning Ford vehicles.   At the end of day two, you will have an understanding of the terms used in Ford EFI, be able to pick out the most important items that you need to change in a calibration when tuning and see how software can be used with Moates tools to tune vehicles.  GUFB (aka 89-93 MAF Fox Body Mustangs) and CBAZA (aka 94-95 Mustangs) will be the focus of this day.

Day 3 (TBA) will focus on hands-on usage of TPRT and BE, acquiring data from street and dyno use, analyzing it, diagnosing issues and making changes to tune your vehicle.  We will be acquiring data on the street and on the dyno and using it to make targeted changes.   This will be putting the theory from previous days together with real vehicles and seeing how to apply our understanding of Ford MAF systems to achieve results.  At the end of day three, you will be able to understand enough of Ford EFI systems and the software available to work with Moates tools to be able to acquire data and make precise changes based on measurements rather than simply “mashing buttons” to get results.

Plan on 8-10 hours of being focused per day.  We’ll typically run on a 9ish-6ish kind of day depending on how things go.  (Local time is Eastern Standard Time – EST)

There will be lunch, snacks and drinks provided.  At previous classes, we had an optional group dinner afterwards that worked out well.  Some of the best discussion ended up coming up over dinner, so we’ll probably try to do that again.

We’ll try to have a good chunk of the curriculum up here on the support site prior to the class for you to review and prepare.

Travel Information

The dyno portion of the class will be held at Zerolift Autolab, 100 Security Dr, Fairfield, OH 45014

The classroom portion will be held TBA, either at Zerolift or a nearby hotel.

Suggested Hotel information will be updated at a later date.

The location is approximately 45 minutes drive from Cincinnati/NKY airport (CVG) and approximately an hour from Dayton International Airport.

Other Class Opportunities

Check out the support site for other opportunities to take a class on using Moates products.

89-93 Ford Fox Body Mustang 5.0: A9L / GUFB family

Introduction

The Fox Body Mustang switched to using a Mass Air Flow meter to measure airflow in 1989.  Uses TFI distributor, sequential injection for up to 8 injectors, MAF air metering.  This EEC-IV system became the blueprint for future Ford systems (EECV and beyond) for years to come.  Initially hindered by a lack of datalogging capabilities, this platform has been able to truly shine with the help of Moates tuning tools.

Hardware for Tuning

  • QuarterHorse – integrated device brings unique functionality to the table.  It is a “chip on steroids” that allows you to make changes while the vehicle is running and (with supporting software) log live data from the vehicle.
  • F3 – simple chip module that can store one or two tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.  Requires Jaybird programmer or BURN2+FA.
  • F8 – fancy chip module that can store eight tunes and switch between them while vehicle is running.   Can also be programmed while installed – no need to remove chip to reprogram it.  Requires Destiny programmer
  • BURN2 + FA + FE – generic chip programmer with Ford adapter (FA) and ECM interface (FE) that can be used to read the current program from EECIV and EECV ECMs on the bench.

Software for Tuning

Although several different strategies (or “operating systems”) were used on this generation of computer, all of them are capable of using the GUFB (i.e. A9L) code.  This can be downloaded with tuning software so it is not critical to read your own ECM.  This is a very common, well supported application.  Any of the three tuning softwares that we sell will work for this application.  Any tunes developed using a QuarterHorse can be programmed to F3/F8 chips for long term use

  • Binary Editor 2012 ($100 – $171 available from Moates.net) is a Ford-specific graphically oriented tuning software that supports many EEC-IV and EEC-V processors.  There are several options for BE2012:
    • Free built-in definitions for BE2012 come with the software.  They’re reasonably complete and work really well.  Support GUFB (A9L, etc.) GUF1 (A9P, etc.) and GUFA (others) natively
    • Core Tuning definition ($195 available through Coretuning.Net) – uses same standards for organization as other Core Tuning defs, very complete.
    • EEC Analyzer ($50 available from Moates.net) is an optional companion program to Binary Editor to assist with analyzing data and automating tuning tasks.
  • TunerPro RT ($30 / free available from Moates.net) is a universal tuning software that supports the GUFB strategy editing using definitions available on TunerPro’s website.
    • Only supports GUFB (A9L) natively.  Auto cars can be tuned using GUFB with conversion to manual in tune.
  • EEC Editor ($30 / $35 available from Moates.net) is a Ford-specific tuning software that supports both the GUFB, GUF1 and GUFA strategies
    • Reasonably complete editing definitions
    • Reasonably complete logging definitions
    • Does not run well on all computers.

Recommended Combos

Just want to know what to buy?  All of these will be valid combos that will allow you to tune a vehicle effectively.

(Ford Dealer Kit)

(QuarterHorse AND Jaybird AND F3 AND Binary Editor 2012 WITH Dongle AND Innovate MTX wideband AND Keyspan USB->Serial)

(QuarterHorse AND Jaybird AND F3 AND TunerPro RT AND Innovate MTX wideband)

(Jaybird AND F3 AND TunerPro RT)

86-92 GM TBI Trucks without elec. trans: 1227747

Introduction

The 86 throttle body injection (TBI) system was the beginning of GM’s transition from carburetors to fuel injection.  This is the first of the “classic” speed-density computers which featured a MAP sensor for airflow metering.  This fundamental airflow model was used largely unaltered in later designs.  P3 generation ECM, 160 baud ALDL communication, 24 pin chip module with 27C32 UV-Erase EPROM.

This ECM was used into the mid-90s in manual transmission equipped vehicles.  It was replaced with newer hardware when the 4l60e and 4L80e electronically-controlled transmissions were introduced.

Hardware Required for Tuning

  • G2 Chip adapter and C2 27SF512 chip required to reprogram ECM.
  • WARNING: This is NOT plug and play!  Desoldering factory chip is required and soldering install for G2 adapter.  (view install)  Order the “Install Service” and send us your ECM if you’re not comfortable with soldering work.
  • BURN2 Chip Programmer programs 27SF512 chips
  • ALDU1 with CABL1 required for datalogging
  • Ostrich2 and SocketBooster 1.0 required for real time tuning
  • APU1 AutoPROM All-in-one device works great, taking the place of BURN2, ALDU1+CABL1 and Ostrich2
  • APU1 works great for the application and is the recommended hardware in addition to the G2.

Software Required for Tuning

These computers use the $42 mask from the factory.

TunerPro RT + the $42 definitions works for editing and datalogging.  (this is the recommended software.  It is included with the AutoProm)

TunerCat OBD1 tuner with the $42 definition works for editing.

WinALDL works for datalogging.

91-93 GMC Syclone / Typhoon 1227749

Introduction

The 91-93 Syclone trucks and Typhoon SUVs were a unique low-production vehicle that featured a powerful turbocharged 4.3L V6 engine.  They use the 1227749 ECM, which is most similar to the 1227730 used in the 90-92 TPI V8s.  These vehicles were equipped with a 2 bar MAP sensor from the factory along with hardware for controlling an intercooler pump and boost control solenoid.  There is no transmission shift control on these ECMs.  8192 baud datalogging, P4 generation ECM with memcal.

Hardware for Tuning

  • G1 Chip adapter and C2 27SF512 chip required to reprogram ECM
  • G3 Chip adapter, C3 29F040 chip and Ex remote for multi-position chip for multiple tunes
  • BURN2 Chip Programmer programs 27SF512 chips
  • ALDU1 with CABL1 required for datalogging
  • Ostrich2 required for real time tuning
  • APU1 AutoPROM All-in-one device has complications with datalogging.  The APU1 is NOT recommended for the 1227749 ECM!!!  The combination of Ostrich, ALDU1+CABL1 and BURN2 is recommended.

Software for Tuning

These computers use the $58 mask supporting 2 Bar MAP sensors from the factory.  Numerous modifications were available to enable the use of a 3 bar MAP sensor including the “Ultimate Chip” and Code59.

TunerPro RT + the $58 or Code59 definitions works for editing and datalogging.  (this is the recommended software.)

TunerCat OBD1 tuner with the $58 definition works for editing.

TTS Datamaster with the $58 definition works for datalogging.

Custom ROMs may package their own definitions and require specific software support.

Recommended Purchase

G1 + C2 + BURN2 + Ostrich2 + ALDU1 w/CABL1 + Innovate MTX-L + TunerPro RT

86-89 TPI GM Corvette, Firebird, Camaro 1227165 16198259

Introduction

The 86-89 F and Y bodies were among the first EFI computers used by GM that featured a Mass Air Flow sensor (MAF) for air metering.  P4 generation ECM, 160 or 8192 baud ALDL communication (depends on code mask), “memcal” with 27C128 EPROM.  Many of these ECMs feature a cold-start injector.  They can drive up to 8 injectors and a single coil with distributor.  There is no transmission shift control on these ECMs. The 1227165 and 16198259 ECMs can be used interchangeably.

Hardware for Tuning

  • G1 Chip adapter and C2 27SF512 chip required to reprogram ECM
  • BURN2 Chip Programmer programs 27SF512 chips
  • ALDU1 with CABL1 required for datalogging
  • Ostrich2 required for real time tuning
  • APU1 AutoPROM All-in-one device works in most cases but there can be some complications with datalogging.  The APU1 is NOT recommended for the 1227165 ECM!!!  The combination of Ostrich, ALDU1+CABL1 and BURN2 is recommended.

Software for Tuning

These computers use different masks depending on the application.  $32, $32B and $6E are the most common masks.

TunerPro RT + the $32, $32B and $6E definitions works for editing and datalogging.

TunerCat OBD1 tuner with the $32, $32B and $6E definitions works for editing.

TTS Datamaster with the $32, $32B and $6E  definitions works for datalogging.

Recommended Purchase

G1 + C2 + BURN2 + Ostrich2 + ALDU1 w/CABL1 + Innovate MTX-L + TunerPro RT

90-92 Firebird, Camaro F Body: 1227730

Introduction

The 90-92 Firebird and Camaro were the first of the P4 generation computers which featured a MAP sensor and speed-density for airflow metering.  These fundamental airflow models were used largely unaltered in later designs.  P4 generation ECM, 8192 baud ALDL communication, “memcal” with 27C256 EPROM.

Hardware Required for Tuning

  • G1 Chip adapter and C2 27SF512 chip required to reprogram ECM
  • BURN2 Chip Programmer programs 27SF512 chips
  • ALDU1 with CABL1 required for datalogging
  • Ostrich2 required for real time tuning
  • APU1 AutoPROM All-in-one device works great, taking the place of BURN2, ALDU1+CABL1 and Ostrich2

Software Required for Tuning

These computers use the $8D mask from the factory.  There is a “Super $8D” mod that adds extra features beyond the stock $8D code.  It is also possible (and recommended) to run Code59 on the 1227730 for forced-induction applications.

TunerPro RT + the $8D, Super$8D or Code59 definitions works for editing and datalogging.  (this is the recommended software.  It is included with the AutoProm)

TunerCat OBD1 tuner with the $8D definition works for editing.

TTS Datamaster with the $8D definition works for datalogging.

Binary Editor 2012: Dongle updates for EEC Analyzer

Introduction

If you purchase Binary Editor 2012 with a dongle from us, it will come pre-activated for Binary Editor and the Innovate Wideband logger.  If you purchased EEC Analyzer, you will need to gather and send some information to Binary Editor’s author so an update can be issued for your dongle.

Procedure

  1.  Fire up Binary Editor 2012 with your dongle connected.
  2. Look at the top of the screen.  It should say “Registered to Moates 1234″
  3. Fire an email to techsupport@eecanalyzer.net :

“This is John User.  My dongle number is Moates 1234.  Please send me a dongle update for EEC Analyzer that I purchased through Moates.  Thanks!”

OBD1 GM: Checksum Disable

Introduction

The check sum routine is a piece of the ECU code that checks to make sure the program is valid.  When you use the “Save” or “Save As…” commands in TunerPro, TunerPro updates the checksum automatically.  This is why this is not a concern when burning chips – the checksum is updated when you save the bin.   When you are doing real time tuning with the Ostrich or APU1 Autoprom, it is possible to put the ECM in a “fault mode” by making changes with the vehicle running because the checksum routine interprets the changes you have made as a corrupt chip.  In order to avoid this, you have two choices:

  1. Use “Save” or “Save As…” in TunerPro before pressing the “Upload” button so that the checksum gets updated along with any changes
  2. Disable the checksum routine prior to uploading.  Doing so will allow you to use realtime chip emulation and make changes incrementally.

Checksum Disable Procedure, In General

The general procedure for disabling the checksum is the same for all OBD1 GM computers:

  1. Locate the chip code mask byte. (This byte will be the same as the mask definition you are using in hexadecimal, i.e. $42 for a 1227747, $8D for a 1227730, $0D or $0E for a 16197427, etc.)  This can be called “Code mask” or “Chip code mask” or any number of things in the XDF – there is no standard.  Some XDFs do not even define this byte at all.  It is generally the 9th byte of the ROM for most 28 pin chip ROMs ( address 0x0008h, 04008h ) or the 5th for most 24 pin applications ( 0x0004h )
  2. Change the code mask from its default value to $AA in hex ( 170 in decimal)

Specific Example: TunerPro and $0D

  1. Locate the chip code mask byte, verify that it is $0D in stock form:
    $OD Mask stock
  2. Change the value from “$0D” (hex) to “$AA” (hex) :
    $OD Mask no checksum

Capacitor Repair: Ford A9L ECM

Intro

All electronics will fail with age.  A significant chunk of the failures are due to electrolytic capacitor failure.  These components are virtually guaranteed to fail eventually, even under normal use circumstances.  There are even calculators that can help you estimate how long a given capacitor will last!

So why do manufacturers use these components if they know they will eventually fail?  There really aren’t a lot of good alternatives that have the necessary specifications AND are inexpensive.

Bottom line: all electronic devices that have power supplies generally have electrolytic capacitors that fail.  Ford ECMs are no exception.

A9L Capacitor Replacement

Note: all of these pictures are fairly high res.  If you click them to view the original, you will be able to zoom in for much more detail.

There are three capacitors that typically need replaced in an A9L / Fox Body MAF ECM.

  1. First step: Take off all the A9L’s clothes.  Both upper and lower case will need to come off.  These are TORX screws!


    A9L unclothed

  2. Next, locate the capacitors that need to be replaced.
  3. A9L unclothed caps marked

  4. Here is one of the cans, close up:
    original cap 1

    Even in this extreme close up shot of the base, it is hard to see anything OBVIOUSLY wrong.

    original cap 1 base

  5. Next step: de-solder the old capacitors.  Like always, we recommend that you use a high-quality de-soldering tool such as the Hakko 808 or a Xytronic 988.  You’ll have a hard time if you try to use a de-soldering braid.  I had to apply a lot of heat and go really slowly in order to achieve solid results.
    Bottom:
    original cap 1 desoldered bottom
    Top:
    original cap 1 desoldered top
  6. Next, it’s time to solder in a replacement.
    Bottom:
    replacement soldered bottom
    Top:
    replacement soldered top
  7. And sometimes when you look a little closer you will see that those caps that looked OK from a distance really had more serious issues…
    bad old capacitor 2 on board closeup
    bad old capacitor 2 on board closeup 2
  8. After you get it out of there, you can see the true mess:
    bad old capacitor 2 on board goop 2
    The capacitor really isn’t much better.  It pretty much fell apart being removed.  You can see that it was leaking pretty severely:
    bad old capacitor
  9. When you have goop on the circuit board, you should clean it up nicely before replacing the cap.  A Q-tip and rubbing alcohol was used here:
    bad old capacitor 2 board cleaned up 2
  10. Once everything is cleaned up, solder away with the replacements.  This ECU pictured took about 30-40 minutes to split, de-solder caps, re-solder caps, clean J3 port and re-assemble.

Ford EFI Tuning Class – Fall 2014 Baton Rouge, LA

Another Fall Class!

We are going to be offering a three-day class on tuning Fords with QuarterHorse in Fall 2014 – weekend of october 11th.  This is the same format class previously offered.  Classroom instruction will take place at the  Classroom instruction will take place in the Moates Event Center around the corner from Moates HQ.  Street tuning and dyno instruction will take place on a dyno in the area.

Cost

Registration for the class will be $350.   You can pay with any of the methods that we accept on the website (Paypal, Credit Card) in advance or pay cash/money order at the door.  If you’re going to pay at the door, we ask that you purchase the class item from our website and select “Check or Money order” at checkout so we can keep an accurate headcount and reserve your spot.  All of the products that are used for the class will be available for purchase at/after the event at a discount for attendees. You can register for the event here.

Class Overview

Dave Blundell, Moates tech support and former tuner at Modular Depot will be the instructor.   Craig Moates, founder and engineer of Moates products will give an in depth overview of hardware.

Registration will be limited to 12 people in order to keep the class manageable and give everyone a chance to get involved and ask questions.  There will be a mixture of classroom instruction, live in-car demonstration of logging techniques with street driving and dyno tuning and techniques.  Forced induction and naturally aspirated modifications and tuning will be covered.  We expect lots of discussion and have built time for this into the class schedule.

Primary focus will be on 89-95 (i.e. Fox-body Mustang, 94-95 Mustang) EEC-IV MAF Fords but much of the material will carry to later models also supported by the same hardware and software. This class is aimed at beginner-intermediate users, but those with literally no experience at all may want to look at some of the material in advance in order to be better prepared.  Likewise, if you have years of experience with Ford EFI tuning and you’re simply looking to get familiar with using our products for the EEC-IV platform, you should already be familiar with some of the material presented.  We cover everything from physical engine operation to air metering methods to Ford implementations with a goal of helping you make targeted tuning changes and not just “button mashing.”

Schedule of Events

Day 1 (TBA) will focus on general theory of how engines work, how electronic engine management works and general approaches to calibration of engine management systems.  Chances are, if you’ve been tuning cars for five years you probably already know a lot of this stuff but it probably wouldn’t hurt you to sit through it again.  If you’re new to engine management, expect your brain to hurt.  The goal of day one is to help you understand how the many pieces of engines, electronics and sensors that you will be dealing with fit together – the big picture.  Most of this day will NOT deal with Ford specific terms and methods.  At the end of the day, you should have a strong understanding of spark ignition internal combustion engines, how and why engines make power, be able to name and explain the function of sensors likely to be found on a fuel injected engine and understand the conditions needed for achieving specific goals such as fuel economy, power or keeping and engine in one piece.  If you’ve previously worked with other systems of engine management, you might look at what you already know in a new light.

Day 2 (TBA) will focus on early Ford engine management.  If you need to get any software set up and configured, we’ll take care of it on this day.  The morning session will focus on Ford specific terms and procedures for running an engine.  The emphasis will be on the most common and important parameters necessary for adjustment.   Fuel, spark, idle and limits will be covered as well as some of the limitations and pitfalls of using factory computers.  Both forced induction and naturally aspirated setups will be discussed.  After lunch, we will demonstrate setting up Moates hardware and how TunerPro RT and Binary Editor 2012 software can be used to make adjustments necessary for tuning Ford vehicles.   At the end of day two, you will have an understanding of the terms used in Ford EFI, be able to pick out the most important items that you need to change in a calibration when tuning and see how software can be used with Moates tools to tune vehicles.  GUFB (aka 89-93 MAF Fox Body Mustangs) and CBAZA (aka 94-95 Mustangs) will be the focus of this day.

Day 3 (TBA) will focus on hands-on usage of TPRT and BE, acquiring data from street and dyno use, analyzing it, diagnosing issues and making changes to tune your vehicle.  We will be acquiring data on the street and on the dyno and using it to make targeted changes.   This will be putting the theory from previous days together with real vehicles and seeing how to apply our understanding of Ford MAF systems to achieve results.  At the end of day three, you will be able to understand enough of Ford EFI systems and the software available to work with Moates tools to be able to acquire data and make precise changes based on measurements rather than simply “mashing buttons” to get results.

Plan on 8-10 hours of being focused per day.  We’ll typically run on a 9ish-6ish kind of day depending on how things go.  (Local time is Central Standard Time – CST)

There will be lunch, snacks and drinks provided.  At previous classes, we had an optional group dinner afterwards that worked out well.  Some of the best discussion ended up coming up over dinner, so we’ll probably try to do that again.

We’ll try to have a good chunk of the curriculum up here on the support site prior to the class for you to review and prepare.

Travel Information

There will be a limited number of spots available at the Moates event center where we are having the class.  Information on regional hotels is available on request.

Other Class Opportunities

Check out the support site for other opportunities to take a class on using Moates products.

QuarterHorse Battery Life

We get asked, “How long will the battery on the QuarterHorse last?”

Unfortunately, we can’t give you a straight answer to this.  It’s not because we’re trying to be difficult – it’s because there are a LOT of variables.

Some things that impact battery life:

  • How much the QH sits vs. the car runs.  The battery on the QH is only used when the key is turned off.  If you drive the car more, the battery will last longer.
  • The temperature that the unit is stored at has a huge impact on battery chemistry.  Self-discharge increases dramatically with storage temperature.
  • The temperature that the battery operates at has a huge effect on its performance.  Lower temperatures decrease the useful life of the battery.
  • Extremely high temperatures (>60C) contribute to extremely rapid death.
  • Batteries discharge while being stored.  We try to buy the freshest stock possible.  We do production runs annually to minimize the time that batteries sit on a shelf prior to being deployed in the field.
  • The conductivity of anti-static bags (like what we use to ship the units) is such that sitting on a shelf prior to sale can adversely affect the battery life.  A technote from Panasonic recently highlighted this. (we’ve altered our storage methods to combat this)
  • There is a decent amount of variation among individual batteries.

The “show car” in a cold climate (i.e. comes out a few times a year) that stays in an unheated garage is pretty much the worse case imaginable.

For a healthy QuarterHorse, we’ve come up with a worst case figure of about 2.5 years and a best case figure of about ten years for battery life.

The chips (F3, F8) that we sell use non-volatile Flash chips that (at least on paper) have guaranteed memory retention of at least 20 years.

While many people think of the QH as a chip and leave it in their vehicle full time, the QH was never intended to be a permanently-installed piece of gear.  It was intended as an emulator, a tuning tool, something to be tethered to a laptop for use.  In cases where the vehicle will no longer run on a factory computer, a dead battery on an emulator will strand you unless you have a laptop handy to re-load the tune.  Like all of our other emulator products, we recommend that a chip be used for long-term operation.

Pinouts for 4-Pin Interconnect Cable for Various Products

The following may seem more complex than necessary, but that comes along with flexibility and compatibility.

Please take a moment to check that you have this arrangement correct for your combination. We’re talking about four pins and colors, you can do this!

For TTL-level communications, we use 4-pin latching interconnect cables.  Because of the variety of devices which can be connected, and because we don’t control all of the different as well as legacy production lines and designs, the pinouts vary from one arrangement to another.

This page details most conceivable arrangements and specifies the correct pinouts for each. In many cases, one end is different from another, so it is important to determine what is being connected to which end of the connection.

The cables come in 3 different lengths: 6″, 12″, and 48″. The 48″ units are shielded with the black-colored lead, the other two are not (they are short). Thus, it is IMPORTANT to be sure that the black wire is connected to the ground line at both ends when using the 48″ cable. If you instead connect a RX or TX line to the shield (black) line of the 48″ cable, you can have trouble. The other lengths can be more forgiving.

Six different pinouts exist, we designate them as A-F. The cable for a given combination.can have two ends different or the same depending on the combination, but luckily, there are only so many combos which are realistic.

 

Quarterhorse Battery and Resistor Check

This note applies to some Quarterhorse hardware version 1.3 (fw ver 1.6) units.

The battery and circuit on the QH v1.3 is designed to last 5+ years before needing replacement. However, a number of QH units were shipped with the incorrect resistor in location R4. This can lead to premature battery drain (less than a year). These units were primarily shipped out during 4Q2012 as a result of undetected assembly error (our bad, sorry!).

If the BR2330A battery on the QH has become low (<2.0v) and/or the QH is losing its memory when the USB is disconnected, it might have been affected by this incorrect resistor placement. A voltage of 2.5v or better should be OK.

To check your QH, measure the resistance (ohms) across R3 (reference) and R4 (placement in question). The correct resistors will give readings of  R3=1.0k and R4=10k (within 5% or so). If R4 instead measures 1.0k, then the unit is affected and R4 needs to be changed to the correct value of 10k. R3 should be fine at 1k on all units.

The solution to this issue is to perform the following:

1) Measure the voltage of the battery (leads are accessible at the bottom of the QH). Record value (good = 2.5v or better, bad = 2.0v or less typically <1v by the time there is a problem).

qh_bat

 

 

2) Measure the resistances across R3 and R4. The ohm readings should be R3=1k, R4=10k.

qh_res

 

3) If the battery voltage is low from step (1) and/or the R4 reading is 1k instead of the correct 10k, then send the unit to us via the RMA option and we will update it for you with a fresh battery and the correct R4 resistor of 10k.

 

Once the correct resistor is in place, a fresh BR2330A battery should last 5+ years.

If you have any questions or believe your QH is affected, please go forward with the RMA process and we will take care of your unit. If you really want to go ahead and perform the update yourself (0402 SMD resistor and TH battery solder work), we can also send you the parts at no charge, just indicate that you want them shipped ahead in the comments section of your RMA submission.

The corrective service is free, and turnaround time is typically only 3-4 days. If you are indeed affected, we will happily work to get you up and running as quickly as possible.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Hope this helps,

Craig Moates

 

Moates Dealers – Ford

About

When Moates.net started, virtually all of our customers were people buying the tools we made for themselves and their own car.  All of our products were shipped blank and tunes were loaded on them by the purchaser.

Since then, things have changed.  There are a lot of shops and tuners out there that are using our products to tune their customers’ cars.  There are a lot of people that are looking for the results that our products can deliver without necessarily having any interest in learning to tune cars themselves.  On this page, you can find a list of shops, tuners and people that use our products for tuning cars where you should be able to get a tune together with Moates hardware.

When you purchase a Ford Dealer Package from our website, you will be added here automatically.  Existing customers that have purchased at least $1000 of Ford product in the past 12 months can obtain dealer status by simply emailing support@moates.net with a request.

Important Note

The individuals and shops on this page are not vetted or screened by Moates.net in any way.  The only qualification for being listed here is to have purchased the requisite materials and given us contact information.   Please do not interpret those listed here as being qualified or endorsed.  You should do your own homework before seeking the services of individuals on this page.  Think of this as craigslist not angieslist. :)

USA

Colorado/Denver – Garry Vance – TheEFIguy@gmail.com

Colorado/Littleton – Eddie Giannini – Elite Performance and Tuning – eliteperformanceandtuning@gmail.com / (720) 229-0331

Florida/Jacksonville – Tony Gonyon – Tuners Inc. tony@tunersinc.com

Florida/Ocala – Steve Hulett – Drag Radial Performance pontisteve@earthlink.net

Kansas/ Junction City – Jeremy Gilbert – Revolution AutoWorks http://www.revolutionautoworksks.com  revolution_autoworks@yahoo.com

Mississippi/Florence – Kyle Rigdon – Speed Productions LLC www.speedproductions.net

New York/Rochester – Adam Marrer – Pops Racing  adam@popsracing.com www.popsracing.com

Ohio/Cincinnati – Dave Blundell accelbydave@gmail.com

Ohio/Cleves – Adam Maurer - adam@sandmmotorsports.net www.sandmmotorsports.net

Texas/Dallas-Ft. Worth – Andy Moye – Prime Tuning sales@prime-tuning.com www.prime-tuning.com

 

Australia

Victoria/Waurn Ponds – Matthew Branch / Bullet Performance Racing www.bpracing.com.au

 

Canada

Ontario/Brantford – Jay Misener / Misener Motorsports www.misenermotorsports.com / (888) 757-1201

South America

Europe

Africa

Ford Tuning Class Fall 2013 – Louisiana (finished)

 We’re offering another class!

We are going to be offering a class on tuning Fords with QuarterHorse November 15th, 16th and 17th in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.   There will be a mixture of classroom instruction, live in-car demonstration of logging techniques with street driving and dyno tuning and techniques.  Classroom instruction will take place in the Moates Event Center around the corner from Moates HQ.  Street tuning and dyno instruction will take place on a rented dynojet in the area.  Dave Blundell, Moates tech support and former tuner at several Midwest speed shops will be the instructor.   Registration will be limited to 12 people in order to keep the class manageable.

Cost

Registration for the class will be $250.   You can pay with any of the methods that we accept on the website (Paypal, Credit Card) in advance or pay cash/money order at the door.  If you’re going to pay at the door, we ask that you purchase the class item from our website and select “Check or Money order” at checkout so we can keep an accurate headcount.  All of the products that are used for the class will be available for purchase at/after the event.

You can register for the event here.

Schedule of Events

Day 1 (Friday November 15) will focus on general theory of how engines work, how electronic engine management works and general approaches to calibration of engine management systems.  Chances are, if you’ve been tuning cars for five years you probably already know a lot of this stuff but it probably wouldn’t hurt you to sit through it again.  If you’re new to engine management, expect your brain to hurt.  The goal of day one is to help you understand how the many pieces of engines, electronics and sensors that you will be dealing with fit together – the big picture.  Most of this day will NOT deal with Ford specific terms and methods.  At the end of the day, you should have a strong understanding of spark ignition internal combustion engines, how and why engines make power, be able to name and explain the function of sensors likely to be found on a fuel injected engine and understand the conditions needed for achieving specific goals such as fuel economy, power or keeping and engine in one piece.  If you’ve previously worked with other systems of engine management, you might look at what you already know in a new light.

Day 2 (Saturday November 16) will focus on early Ford engine management.  The morning session will focus on Ford specific terms and procedures for running an engine.  The emphasis will be on the most common and important parameters necessary for adjustment.   Fuel, spark, idle and limits will be covered as well as some of the limitations and pitfalls of using factory computers.  Both forced induction and naturally aspirated setups will be discussed.  After lunch, we will demonstrate setting up Moates hardware and how TunerPro RT and Binary Editor 2012 software can be used to make adjustments necessary for tuning Ford vehicles.   At the end of day two, you will have an understanding of the terms used in Ford EFI, be able to pick out the most important items that you need to change in a calibration when tuning and see how software can be used with Moates tools to tune vehicles.  GUFB (aka 89-93 MAF Fox Body Mustangs) and CBAZA (aka 94-95 Mustangs) will be the focus of this day.

Day 3 (Sunday November 17) will focus on hands-on usage of TPRT and BE, acquiring data from street and dyno use, analyzing it, diagnosing issues and making changes to tune your vehicle.  We will be acquiring data on the street and on the dyno and using it to make targeted changes.   This will be putting the theory from previous days together with real vehicles and seeing how to apply our understanding of Ford MAF systems to achieve results.  At the end of day three, you will be able to understand enough of Ford EFI systems and the software available to work with Moates tools to be able to acquire data and make precise changes based on measurements rather than simply “mashing buttons” to get results.

Plan on 8-10 hours of being focused per day.  We’ll typically run on a 9ish-6ish kind of day depending on how things go.  (Baton Rouge is in Central Time – CST)

There will be snacks and drinks provided. Previously, we had optional group dinner afterwards that worked out well so we’ll probably try to do that again.

We’ll try to have a good chunk of the curriculum up on the support site prior to the class for you to review and prepare.

Travel Information

There are a limited number of beds in the Moates event center available for FREE.  If you’re interested in staying where we’re having the class, put a note in the ‘Comments’ field when you sign up for the class.  These spaces will go on a first-come first-serve basis.  Additional space is available at area hotels.  Send us an email if you need a recommendation on hotels.

Other Class Opportunities

Check out the support site for other opportunities to take a class on using Moates products.  This class will also be offered in October in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Ford Tuning Class Fall 2013 – Ohio (finished)

We’re offering another class!

We are going to be offering a class on tuning Fords with QuarterHorse October 25th, 26th and 27th in Milford, Ohio (East side of Cincinnati).  There will be a mixture of classroom instruction, live in-car demonstration of logging techniques with street driving and dyno tuning and techniques.  Classroom instruction will take place in the conference room of the Homewood Suites by Hilton Hotel.  Street tuning and dyno instruction will take place on the Dynojet 224 dyno of Easy Street, which is literally across the street from the hotel.  Dave Blundell, Moates tech support and former tuner at Modular Depot and Easy Street will be the instructor.   Registration will be limited to 15 people in order to keep the class manageable.

Cost

Registration for the class will be $250.   You can pay with any of the methods that we accept on the website (Paypal, Credit Card) in advance or pay cash/money order at the door.  If you’re going to pay at the door, we ask that you purchase the class item from our website and select “Check or Money order” at checkout so we can keep an accurate headcount.  All of the products that are used for the class will be available for purchase at/after the event.

You can register for the event here.

Schedule of Events

Day 1 (Friday 10/25) will focus on general theory of how engines work, how electronic engine management works and general approaches to calibration of engine management systems.  Chances are, if you’ve been tuning cars for five years you probably already know a lot of this stuff but it probably wouldn’t hurt you to sit through it again.  If you’re new to engine management, expect your brain to hurt.  The goal of day one is to help you understand how the many pieces of engines, electronics and sensors that you will be dealing with fit together – the big picture.  Most of this day will NOT deal with Ford specific terms and methods.  At the end of the day, you should have a strong understanding of spark ignition internal combustion engines, how and why engines make power, be able to name and explain the function of sensors likely to be found on a fuel injected engine and understand the conditions needed for achieving specific goals such as fuel economy, power or keeping and engine in one piece.  If you’ve previously worked with other systems of engine management, you might look at what you already know in a new light.

Day 2 (Saturday 10/26) will focus on early Ford engine management.  The morning session will focus on Ford specific terms and procedures for running an engine.  The emphasis will be on the most common and important parameters necessary for adjustment.   Fuel, spark, idle and limits will be covered as well as some of the limitations and pitfalls of using factory computers.  Both forced induction and naturally aspirated setups will be discussed.  After lunch, we will demonstrate setting up Moates hardware and how TunerPro RT and Binary Editor 2012 software can be used to make adjustments necessary for tuning Ford vehicles.   At the end of day two, you will have an understanding of the terms used in Ford EFI, be able to pick out the most important items that you need to change in a calibration when tuning and see how software can be used with Moates tools to tune vehicles.  GUFB (aka 89-93 MAF Fox Body Mustangs) and CBAZA (aka 94-95 Mustangs) will be the focus of this day.

Day 3 (Sunday 10/27) will focus on hands-on usage of TPRT and BE, acquiring data from street and dyno use, analyzing it, diagnosing issues and making changes to tune your vehicle.  We will be acquiring data on the street and on the Dynojet 224 dyno at Easy Street and using it to make targeted changes.   This will be putting the theory from previous days together with real vehicles and seeing how to apply our understanding of Ford MAF systems to achieve results.  At the end of day three, you will be able to understand enough of Ford EFI systems and the software available to work with Moates tools to be able to acquire data and make precise changes based on measurements rather than simply “mashing buttons” to get results.

Plan on 8-10 hours of being focused per day.  We’ll typically run on a 9ish-6ish kind of day depending on how things go. (Cincinnati is on Eastern Time, EST)

There will be snacks and drinks provided.  There are also numerous restaurants within walking/short drive distance of the facilities we will be at.  At the last class, we had optional group dinner afterwards that worked out well so we’ll probably try to do that again.

We’ll try to have a good chunk of the curriculum up on the support site prior to the class for you to review and prepare.

Travel Information

There will be ten rooms reserved and a group rate ($109/night for room with one queen + pull out couch + mini kitchen) at the hotel where the presentations will be held until 9/26 (one month prior).  Mention the Moates tuning class to get the special rate.  There are lots of other places to stay in the area – if you have any trouble contact us.

Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky (CVG) airport is about 30 minute drive.  Dayton International (DAY) is right around an hour drive.  Columbus International (CMH) is about an hour forty minute drive.  There is adequate parking at the hotel and the shop across the street where we will be using the dyno.

Other Class Opportunities

Check out the support site for other opportunities to take a class on using Moates products.  This class will also be offered in Louisiana in November/December.

Datalogging with an ALDU1

The ALDU1 is a simple logging cable.  It attaches to the USB port of your PC and to the ALDL logging port on your vehicle.  It allows your PC to communicate with your ECM.

Basic Connectivity

The ALDU1 uses a USB connection to talk to your PC.  It uses the same FTDI drivers that all of our other products use.  The first step in getting the AutoPROM working is to get your PC to recognize it.

  1. Turn on the computer you want to use with the APU1 and plug the APU1 in to a free USB port.
  2. Follow the instructions in the USB troubleshooting guide to ensure the device is recognized by Windows.
  3. Although it is mentioned in the guide above, make sure the ALDU1 is using a COM port between 1 and 8!  This is CRITICAL for some older software.
  4. The rest of the troubleshooting guides in this guide will assume that you have basic USB connectivity.

Using the ALDU for Logging with TunerPro

Before you will be able to log any data, you need to have the correct ADX definition file downloaded for your vehicle.  The best place to find these is the Definitions section of TunerPro’s website.

With that said, follow these instructions to get everything set up:

  1. Make sure the ALDU1 is connected to your PC and has a COM port between 1 and 8.  It will be necessary for you to know which COM port the ALDU1 is using to configure it properly.  Consult the instructions above for ‘Basic Connectivity’ for more detailed instructions.
  2. We’re going to walk through the TunerPro RT configuration steps to use this mode.  Your ALDU1 will NOT be recognized by TunerPro RT software like an Ostrich or APU1.  If you’re not using TunerPro, skip to step 7.
  3. Next, make double check TunerPro’s configuration for logging.  Start by going to Tools…Preferences
  4. Next, Tab over to the Data Acq. /Emulation tab. (red arrow)  Make sure that “Use Plug-in” is selected for Interface Type.  Make sure “TunerPro Data Acquisition I/O Interface” is selected under the component drop down box.
  5. Then click the “Configure Plug-in Component” box (green arrow).
  6. Make sure that “Standard Serial” is selected (green arrow) and the COM port of your APU1 is selected (blue arrow)
  7. IF THE ALDU1 IS UNPLUGGED FROM THE VEHICLE, you should be able to click the “Test For Valid Interface Using Settings” button and get a successful result.  You will NOT get a positive test if the cable is plugged in to the vehicle.
  8. If you are NOT using TunerPro RT, you should be able to start your software of choice and configure it to use the COM port of your ALDU1 (COM2 in this example)
  9. If you have trouble connecting, check the switch on the ALDU1.  Older applications that use 160baud require the ”10k across A-B” setting.  Later TPI, LTI and TBI applications use 8192 baud which requires the switch to be in the ”open between A-B” position.

1. Tuning Course: Introduction, Goals, Limitations

Tuning: Why bother?

The rise of electronic engine management allows for the running conditions of an engine to be rapidly and precisely adjusted.  Before we talk about anything super technical, it’s worth examining some really basic stuff like, “why should we bother tuning a car in the first place?”  “What can we reasonably hope to accomplish?”

Sometimes we start with an engine that’s running acceptably but we want to slightly change how it operates to achieve our goals.  Sometimes we start with an engine that doesn’t run at all because it is so different from the original system that was running that we have to tune it for it to run acceptably.  Regardless of whether adjustments are made out of necessity or desire, the answer to this “why bother” question is simple: in a word, it is OPTIMIZATION.  Tuning allows us to make the most out of the engine that we have.

What Tuning ISN’T

Tuning cars is often very misunderstood, especially by people who do not do it.  There is no magic involved.  You cannot wave a magic wand and violate the laws of physics in the name of making horsepower.  You are dealing with a computer system that responds to sensors in a predictable way.

There is one golden rule (which I think has its origins in a completely different realm) which applies here:

Garbage In, Garbage Out.

As a tuner, you can only work with what you are given.   This may seem so obvious that it is a waste of time to even say it.  Trust me.  It isn’t.  It’s critical.  And at some point if you mess around with tuning vehicles long enough, you will get so focused on the knobs and buttons available to turn on your computer that you will forget about the mechanical system you are controlling.

  • Changing a computer program can’t fix mechanical issues.
  • Changing a computer program can’t fix electrical issues.
  • Changing a computer program can’t make more air enter an engine than it can mechanically pump
  • Changing a computer program can’t make more fuel flow through pumps/injectors than they can mechanically pump
  • Bottom line: You can’t make pigs fly by pushing buttons.  The physical motor you are working with will define what you do on the computer.

Tuning Possibilities

So if we are inherently limited by the physical engine that we are dealing with, what CAN we typically accomplish with tuning?

Typically, we can:

  • Increase power / torque output of the engine
  • Increase efficiency / decrease fuel consumption
  • Decrease noxious emissions (Carbon Dioxide/CO2, hydrocarbons/HC, Carbon Monoxide/CO, Nitrous oxide/N2O, Nitrogen Oxides/NOx)
  • Control NVH (Noise – Vibration – Harshness)
  • Decrease stress on mechanical components / prevent damage to mechanical components
  • Many of these goals require different operating conditions making it impossible to do all of them at once! 

Conclusion

Tuning isn’t magic.  Modifying electronic engine control systems lets you get the most out of the physical system that you’re working with.  Through tuning, you can choose how to operate an engine in order to achieve the goals that are most important to you, making the compromises you want to make.  The goal of this course is going to be to teach you to use a calculator/simple math and data logging combined with an understanding of underlying processes to make targeted and appropriate changes in order to achieve the operating conditions you desire for your engine.

0. Tuning Course READ ME FIRST !!!

We decided to try to make a lot of the material that was covered at the tuning class 4/20/13 + 4/21/13 available for all of our users. The material here is designed to be comprehensive. It is designed to be followed in a specific order. There will be links to more information on selected topics throughout. If you’re looking for a snippet about a particular thing, you may want to look at the “How Tuning Works” section instead, as it is more of a collection of small articles than a comprehensive course.  The idea with this course isn’t to tell you which value to change to make your car run right.  The idea is to teach you how engine management works so that you can look at something you’ve never seen before and (hopefully) have some clue as to how to approach getting it to do what you want.  This course is heavy on theory.  It’s also hopefully going to have lots of practical sections that connect with things you may be more familiar with from working with particular EFI systems.

The material in this course represents *hours* (think: whole day+) worth of classroom lecture and discussion. Be prepared to spend an extended period of time reading through it and processing it. When you’re done, you’ll arguably be better prepared to tackle tuning than half the shops that practice on your car.

Enjoy!

(More will be coming soon as time permits.)

Ford Tuning Class April 2013 (finished)

Thank you NOLA Motorsports Park for hosting us for the First Moates 4/20-4/21 Ford EFI training!

The quality of the facility, students, participants, and support staff all worked together to yield a ‘class act’ of a weekend!

We all had a great time, and everyone learned something. Group discussions, generous facilities, and a rich diversity of participants all contributed to the weekend’s success.

We will update this page with additional presentation material, video content, feedback, and review as it is prepared, but for now, here are some photos of the group going through the paces of teaching and learning.

class_9

Dave getting ready to do some ‘airport departure’ tuning.

class_6

Group trying to decide who messed with the lap timer and who ‘actually’ won.

class_5

Mark & Michael in the back row.

class_2

Steve using the coffee makers as props while explaining LWFM methods.

j3_cleaning

Dave bending the J3 port to his will.

class_8 class_7 class_4 class_3 class_1

Beginners: Programming Chips

A lot of the questions we get either via email or on the support line boil down to, “how do I program a chip?”

You asked, we deliver!  This tutorial is going to picture the BURN2 but it applies equally to the BURN1 and APU1/AutoPROM as well.

Step by step:

  1. Get out your burner and a chip.  Our burners will work with the SST27SF512 chips we sellstart
  2.  

  3. Plug the burner in to your laptop’s USB port.
  4.  

  5. Install the chip per directions printed on the burner – the unused pins should be closest to the metal handle.  The divet on the chip used to mark pin 1 should also face the metal handle.chip_orientation
  6.  

  7. Fire up our Flash n Burn software.  (If you do not have Flash n Burn, see here)open flashnburn
  8.  

  9. Assuming that your drivers are loaded and your hardware is working, you should see this screen after the software loads:
    hardware found
    If instead you see something like this:
    no hardware detected
    “No Hardware Found” means that you should see the BURN2 troubleshooting guide,
  10.  

  11. Next, select the chip type from the list in the upper left hand corner.
    ( 28 pin = SST27SF512 *OR* Jaybird/BURN2+FA with F3 chip = J3 Ford Adapter)
    chip type
  12.  

  13. Chips need to be be blank before you program them.  Click “Erase Chip” and then “Blank Check”  This will erase the chip and then perform a check to see if it is blank.  If it succeeds, you should see this:
    chipblank
    If you see this instead:
    chip not blank
    Try another chip.
    If your burner fails to erase several different chips, you probably need to send it back for service.
  14.  

  15. At this point, you have a blank chip correctly inserted in your burner with the correct chip type selected.  The next step is to load the file you want to program to the chip.  To do this, click “Load File to buffer” and then point it at the file on your PC that you want to program.
    select file
  16.  

  17. Double check the addressing settings.  In most cases, the software will automatically set these for you.  These settings are important because most of the chips used in ECUs are a smaller capacity than the chip you are programming.  You need to make sure the program you put in the chip ends up in the top (end) of the chip, so these settings matter.  A short list of chip addressing settings: 
    • 64k bin: 000000 start 00FFFF end ( SST27SF512 chip )
    • 32k bin: 008000 start 00FFFF end ( SST27SF512 chip )
    • 16k bin: 00C000 start 00FFFF end ( SST27SF512 chip )
    • 4k bin: 00F000 start 00FFFF end ( SST27SF512 chip )
    • 56k Ford EECIV bin: 032000 start 03FFFF end ( Ford F3 chip )
    • 256k Ford EECV bin: 000000 start 03FFFF end ( Ford F3 chip )
    • 112k Ford EECV bin: SPECIAL need other software ( Ford F3 chip )
    • 216k Ford EECV bin: SPECIAL need other software ( Ford F3 chip )

    check_settings

  18.  

  19. Click “Program Chip”  You should see a progress bar march across and then the software report “PROM I/O succeeded.”
    program successful
  20.  

  21. Now click “Verify Chip w/ Buffer”  This will read the contents of the chip back and check them against the program you have loaded in the buffer.  If this test passes, you can be confident that the chip was programmed correctly.  You should see: “SUCCESS:Verification Succeeded” as the message reported back.verify good 
    If you see this, you are DONE and the chip is programmed correctly! 
  22.  

  23. If instead you see “FAILURE: Verification Failed (not matched)” you will need to do some troubleshooting:verify bad
    • Check and make sure the chip is inserted firmly in the socket. Remove it and re-insert it to be safe.
    • Re-erase and blank check it. If it passes a blank check, try programming it again.
    • If it fails the blank check, try another chip.
    • Try another chip
    • If you’re still having trouble, contact us.

EFI Live: Requesting a VIN license

Intro

EFI Live Commercial Scan and Tune comes with two VIN licenses. To tune more vehicles, you must provide us some information when you purchase VIN or stream licenses.

Requesting a New License

  1. Plug in your EFI Live FlashScan handheld to your laptop.  Its display should be lit up.
  2. Double click on the “EFILive V7.5 Tune Tool” icon to start the software.  If you do not have this on your desktop, go to the “Start” menu and find it under the EFI Live program group.
    EFI Live Tune Tool
  3. Go to the “Help” menu and select “FlashScan V2 / AutoCal V2 VIN Licensing…”  help_vinlicensing
  4. We need two pieces of information from here.  #1 – WE NEED YOUR SERIAL NUMBER.  You can click the “Copy” button to copy it to the clipboard.
    copy_serial
  5. Once it has been copied, open up an email to us (or the Comments section of your order) and press Control-V (or right click + select paste).  Doing things this way ensure you don’t make a typo.
    comments_serial
  6. Next, click the “Authenticate” table towards the bottom of this window.
    select_authenticate
  7. On the “Authenticate” tab is another important piece of information we need, the Auth Code.  Click “Copy” to copy the Auth Code to the clipboard.
    copy_auth
  8. Go back to your email to us / comments for your order.  Hit Control-V again to paste your Auth Code
    comments_serial_auth
  9. That’s it!  Go ahead and submit your Serial + Auth with your order.  If you forget to do so, you can email it to support@moates.net

Installing a License Key

After you’ve paid for your licenses, you need to use the information we give you to add them to your EFI Live handheld.

  1. Plug in your EFI Live FlashScan handheld to your laptop.  Its display should be lit up.
  2. Double click on the “EFILive V7.5 Tune Tool” icon to start the software.  If you do not have this on your desktop, go to the “Start” menu and find it under the EFI Live program group.
    EFI Live Tune Tool
  3. Go to the “Help” menu and select “FlashScan V2 / AutoCal V2 VIN Licensing…”
    help_vinlicensing
  4. Decision time: What did you purchase?
    • If you purchased an Upgrade to Dodge (from Chevy only) select “Upgrade” (blue)
    • If you purchased a Stream license for unlimited VINs of a certain type of vehicle, select “Add Stream” (yellow)
    • If you purchased a VIN License(s) select “Add VIN” (green)
      license_options
  5. Look at the email you will have received from us and find the important information.  Activation Code (Red) Number of licenses purchased (yellow)  Total license ount (green)

    moates_license_email

  6. Enter the Activation code you should have received in the box and click “Add”.   If you’re entering VIN Licenses, you need to adjust the license number before clicking “Add”.  To do this:
    • Look at the license screen to the right and count the number of licenses in use currently. (4 in the pictured example)
    • Add the number of licenses purchased to the number of licenses in use
    • Set the ‘License number’ to this value.

      enter_info

  7. You should see a message informing you that the change was successful.
    success
  8. You should see the new licenses available for use.
    success_newlicenses

WinALDL Software

About

WinALDL is software to datalog on GM vehicles that use the old 160 baud rate.  This includes but is not limited to vehicles using a 1227747 and 1227165 ECM.  Most older TBI GM computers will speak this protocol.  WinALDL does NOT speak to newer GM OBD1 vehicles that use 8192 baud communication.

WinALDL is available from http://winaldl.joby.se/

WinALDL was written several years ago.  It will work best on Windows XP or older operating systems, if available.  You may need to use a VM or Windows XP compatibility mode on newer Windows7 systems in order for it to run 100% properly.

WinALDL will work with both our ALDU1 and AutoProm.

Setup

There are a few setup tasks that need to be performed.

  • Ensure that your ALDU1 or AutoProm is assigned a COM port between 1 and 4.  Make sure you choose a port that does not conflict with system resources.  (see USB guide)
  • If you are using the AutoProm, ensure that it is set to pass-through *NOT* AutoProm mode. (see AutoProm troubleshooting guide)
  • On most 160 baud applications, you will need to set the switch to 10k mode on your AutoProm or ALDU1
  • Set the COM port selection in WinALDL to match what it set up to on the USB driver under the control panel.
  • Set the baud rate to 4800 within the WinALDL program.
  • Select the ECM type in WinALDL which matches your ECM.
  • Make sure the ALDU1 is connected to the laptop prior to starting the software.
  • Turn your key off, connect the ALDU1 to the car, and start the software.
  • Turn the car on, it should connect.

Moates hardware works with TTS Datamaster

Our products (AutoProm, ALDU1) work with TTS Datamaster.  We do not sell TTS Datamaster – this page is provided for informational purposes only.  For more information, please see Datamaster’s website.

Moates hardware works with TunerCat OBD1 Tuner

Our OBD1 tuning products ( AutoProm, ALDU1+CABL1, BURN2, Ostrich) will work with CATS OBD1 Tuner.  We do not sell this package – this page is provided for information purposes only.  For more information, visit TunerCat.com

Tuner Pro RT v5: Using TPRT with QuarterHorse

Introduction

The QuarterHorse Ford tuning tool is supported by TunerPro RT version 5 and newer.  This document will briefly cover the steps necessary for using the QuarterHorse with TunerPro RT.

General Setup

First, the QuarterHorse must have its drivers properly installed.  The QuarterHorse uses the same FTDI device drivers as most of our other products.  Please see the USB Device installation article for more information on installing drivers.  Having the driver’s latency settings set to one will make a difference in how the QH behaves.  Visit the USB Troubleshooting 101 article to for screenshots of how to configure latency in the advanced driver options.

TunerPro Setup

Once the drivers are configured properly, launch TunerPro RT.

TunerPro should make a “beep” to indicate that it found the QuarterHorse and you should see a notice indicating hardware was detected in the lower-left information bar:

If you do not see “Found QuarterHorse vX.XX” go back to the USB troublehshooting guide.  TunerPro will need to have found your QH to continue with this guide.

Next up, we need to configure TunerPro to use the same port for datalogging and emulation.  Go to the Tools menu and select preferences.  Once you are looking at the preferences, select the Data Acq./Emulation tab:

In this screen, there are three options you need to set.  First, choose “Use Plug-in” for the interface Type.  Second, click the “Configure Plug-in Component” box.  Third, choose “Shared With Emulator” and then click OK several times to get back to the main application.

Finally, you need to make sure you have the appropriate XDF and ADX files loaded.  Support for the QuarterHorse has to be made specially for Ford definitions.  You can find the latest definitions that we maintain here or browse TunerPro’s website for others.

Ford: TunerPro Definitions for QuarterHorse

Introduction

In addition to any definitions you might find on TunerPro’s Webpage or TI Performance‘s webpage, there are also some definitions we maintain. (A little…)  If you are going to try to use the QuarterHorse with any of the strategies on this page with TunerPro, these are the definitions we recommend you use.

TunerPro Defs for QuarterHorse

89-93 Mustang / Cobra GUFB strategy - A9L, A3M, A3M1, X3Z, S0Z, etc.  A9L-GUFB-TunerPro Download (mostly done by Michael Ponthieux, Craig Moates, Dave Blundell and ???)

94-95 Mustang / Cobra CBAZA strategy - T4M0, U4P0, W4H0, J4J1, etc. T4M0-CBAZA-TunerPro-Download (mostly done by Michael Ponthieux, Cody Hindman, Craig Moates, Dave Blundell and ???)

Troubleshooting: DORESET, the Demon/Ostrich reset utility

The Demon and Ostrich can sometimes get stuck in an odd state.  This utility will allow you to reset them to a known state.

Download link  Download link 2

Live Support Session

Do not try and start a remote session with us unless you are talking to us on the phone or have made an appointment for us to expect you.  If you get a message such as  ‘not available’, then you need to speak with us first to be sure we’re scheduled and ready for you.

If you would like a ‘live’ technical support session, where we can take control of your computer remotely to help you walk through  troubleshooting or tutorial exercises, please contact us via email ( support@moates.net ) or phone ( 225 341 3547 ).

A high-speed ‘wired’ internet connection is preferred for these sessions.  We have done them over phones and MiFi devices but it’s usually less useful

*****
You will need to click on the link below to ‘Save File‘ and then ‘Run‘ the associated program.  If you receive a SSL warning, you’ll need to click ‘Yes’ or ‘Allow’ or something of that nature to move through it. CLICK THIS LINK:
LIVE SUPPORT SESSION

After that, you will be prompted to “Allow shared control of your computer“. Do this, and we can take the wheel to help you!

*****
Once you have finished, you can click on the ‘X’ button in the session manager and remove the file from your computer entirely. Many thanks to our partners at www.dp-tuner.com for helping to provide this service!

Nissan: NEMU hardware install

Introduction

The hardware portion of the NEMU tuning package requires installation in an ECU to be functional.  This install is NOT for beginners, although it is not extremely difficult with the correct tools.  This article will walk you through the install from start to finish with lots of pictures along the way.  If you still have any questions about the install after reading this, please contact us via email.

Tools

We are going to use the following tools:

  • Cordless screw gun / drill (recommended) or Phillips screwdriver (required)
  • De-soldering tool with vacuum source (required)
  • Hot-air pencil (recommended)
  • Soldering iron with relatively fine point (required)
  • Extremely fine tipped tweezers (recommended)
  • Pick or extremely small flat head screwdriver (recommended)
  • Wire cutters (recommended)
  • Wire strippers (recommended)
  • Heavy duty snips/cutters, small hacksaw, dremel (recommended)

Procedure

  1. Remove both the top and bottom case from the ECU.   You will want to have the ECU on a flat surface so you can apply a LOT of downward pressure before you start to turn the screw.  Nissan ECU screws have some kind of threadlocker on them from the factory and it is VERY easy to strip and/or break them.  We highly recommend the use of a screw gun like the one pictured here.
  2. Find the 20×2 connector where NEMU will attach.  Use your De-soldering Iron to cleanly remove the solder from all 20 holes.  Be careful to not overheat the circuit board and burn up a trace.  ( Click herefor a video of a professional using high quality tools to effectively de-solder components.)

    Cleanly desolder all contacts of 20x2 header

  3. Remove the 20×2 pin header connector and provided solder from the bag included in your NEMU kit.  Push the pin header through the 20×2 holes in the PCB you just de-soldered.  Make sure the alignment keyway faces INWARDS.

    Keyway faces inwards!

  4. Use your soldering iron and the included length of solder to solder all pin connections.

    20x2 header, soldered

    Be careful not to use too much heat, too little heat, too much solder or too little solder.   Click Here for a video of a professional using high quality tools to effectively solder.  Davy Jones’ EEVblog also has a great series of video tutuorials on soldering.  (Part1Part2Part3)

  5. Look at the bottom of the ECU.  Find the surface mount jumper labelled CJ1.  Use your hot air pencil and tweezers to remove and grab it.

    Remove J1

    If you don’t have hot air, you can CAREFULLY use a soldering iron placed parallel to the jumper to melt its solder connections while applying GENTLE pressure to free it from the PCB.

  6. Use your tweezers and soldering iron to re-solder the jumper in CJ2 position instead of CJ1 where it was originally installed.  This enables the 20×2 port instead of stock ECU operation.  If you lose or damage the jumper removing it, you can use a small piece of wire or even a solder bridge.

    Solder CJ2 into place

  7. Take your NEMU circuit board out of its protective anti-static bag and gently install it in the shrouded 20×2 pin header that you have just installed.  This is just a temporary install for fitment purposes – you do not need to fully seat the NEMU at this time.  Treat it carefully.
  8. Now find the 4 pin connector with 4- 6″ wires hanging out of it.

    4 pin connector with wires

  9. For the sake of tidiness, trim off the black wire as it is not used. (This is not REQUIRED but recommended)

    Datalogging header, ready to install with 3 wires

    Note: the position NOT the color of the wire is important.  If your pigtail has a different color wires, pay attention and pick the wire in the same spot in the connector.

  10. Each of the three remaining wires needs to be soldered to a pin on the blue ECU connector.  The wires provided are much longer than they need to be.  We are going to trim the wires so they are closer to the length necessary.  Plug the 4 pin connector into the NEMU board and then move the three wires to the center of the blue connector for sizing purposes.

    Measure...

  11. Make a cut right by the blue ECU connector to get started.  You’ll find that having wires that are almost the right size makes them a lot easier to handle.

    and cut!

  12. The red wire is going to get soldered to the ‘top’ pin closest to the center divider on the left side.  Cut it closer to size.  Remember, it’s a lot easier to cut it shorter again than it is to have to solder two wires together to lengthen it!  If in doubt, leave it longer.  Repeat the sizing procedure for the yellow and orange wires.  They will go to the top and bottom pins closest to the center divider on the right side.  See the following picture of how things will look when they’re done: (The colors look a little funny because of lighting – red on left, orange center lower, brown center upper)
  13. After you have sized all 3 wires, gently squeeze the black locking tab on the connector to remove the 4 pin datalogging connector from the NEMU board.  You’ll find the rest of this procedure is a lot easier with the freedom to move around.
  14. Strip about 1/4″ to 1/2″ of insulation off the end of each wire with a pair of wire strippers.
  15. Using the soldering iron, warm up the strands of each exposed metal wire for a few seconds.  After you’ve warmed them up, gently touch some solder to the wire itself NOT the soldering iron.  When it is hot enough, the wire will wick up the solder.  (this is called tinning the wire.  You can see a pro demonstrate here or here )  You just need a little bit of solder – don’t goop it.  Having the wires tinned will make it much easier to attach them to ECU pins.
  16. I prefer to start with the most difficult wire to solder so there aren’t other wires in the way – I personally think this is the lower connection on the right side, with the orange wire.  Before trying to solder this connection, we are going to bend the tinned end into a ‘U’ shape so that it will “hook” on the pin.
  17. Trim the wire so it is quite short.  You don’t need much of a hook for this technique to work effectively.
  18. Hook the orange wire on the lower pin on the right side.  You may find it is helpful to squeeze or even wrap the tinned end of the wire around the pin so that it will stay on the pin without you actually holding it.  Apply heat to BOTH the ECU pin and wire with your soldering iron for at least 3-5 seconds and then apply solder to the area where the pin and wire are touching, NOT the soldering iron tip itself.  This is a little tricky, but hopefully you should get something that looks like this:

    orange (rightmost) wire soldered

  19. If you like the hook-and-wrap method, you can use it for the remaining two wires.  I’m going to demonstrate a different method that works equally well, especially because we can reach the pins easier.  Let’s grab the red wire next.  Keep the tinned end straight but trim it so it is a similar size to the pin you are going to be soldering it to.
  20. Bring the trimmed red wire to the pin.  Lay it on top of the pin so that they’re on top of each other.  Apply heat to BOTH the wire and the pin for at least 3-5 seconds, usually by placing the tip of the iron on one side of the pair where it makes equal contact with both the wire and the pin.  Then apply solder where the two are touching, NOT to the soldering iron itself – this is usually done to the opposite side that the iron is touching.  This is a little tricky, but hopefully you’ll end up with something that looks like this:

    solid solder connection on red (2nd from right) wire

  21. Repeat the previous two steps for the brown wire, which attaches to the pin above the orange wire to the right of the center divider.  After this, you should have all three wires attached like so: (The colors look a little funny because of lighting – red on left, orange center lower, brown center upper)
  22. Next, we need to modify the case to give the USB cable room to exit.  I used the oval area near where you normally look at the LED to check codes.  I cut the metal case with a large pair of diagonal cutters.
  23. Now would be a good time to firmly install your NEMU board in the 20×2 header and connect the 4 pin black datalogging connector with wires soldered to ECU pins.
  24. Connect the miniUSB->bulkhead cable in your kit to your NEMU board.  For extra safety (i.e. leaving your laptop plugged in and walking off) I generally tie a pretzel knot in the cable immediately before it exits the ECU case so that the knot will absorb any yank or pull.  Use the supplied zip tie to securely attach the USB cable to the case of the ECU.  Once you’ve done this, trim the zip tie for tidiness.
  25. If you’re going to be using the extra analog inputs offered by NEMU, repeat the last step with the AuxBox cable.  This cable has a ethernet/phone jack looking RJ45 connector on one end and a small black plastic box on the other.
  26. Re-install the case on the ECU.
  27. Go to www.nismotronic.com for the lastest software download.
  28. Enjoy your product!

Ford: Using our gear with other vendors’ products

Fairly regularly we get asked something along the lines of, “I had my car tuned by Joe Bob at Fast Bob’s Racing and he used a ___________ (not ours) chip.  I want to make a few changes to the tune myself.  What do I need to do it?”

Here is the answer:

  • We do not officially support the use of our products with other vendors’ chips AT ALL.
  • We do not design our products to work with other vendors’ products.
  • Chips from other vendors often work (to some extent) with our products because every chip needs to work on the same ECMs, which means they need to do many of the same things electrically speaking.
  • As a rule of thumb, you will probably be able to use our programmers to *READ* chips from other vendors.  There are times when this does not work.  Do not come crying to us if it doesn’t work.
  • As a rule of thumb, you will *NOT* be able to use our programmers to PROGRAM chips from other vendors.  If it works, it works.  We didn’t intend to make it work.  Do not come crying to us if it doesn’t work.
  • If you want to be certain that you can read, program or erase a chip from another vendor, don’t use our tools.  Use the tools provided by that vendor.
  • If you want to be certain that you will be able to program a chip with one of our programmers, use one of our chips.
  • Bottom line: our programmers are designed and tested to work with our chips.  If you can use them with chips from other vendors, it is purely accidental and we do not support it or encourage their use in this way.

Ford Tuning: Injector Scaling

Introduction

One of the most common modifications that require recalibration of the ECM are changing injectors and changing Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensors.

For the rest of this article, we’re going to assume that you’ve already read the articles explaining basic MAF operation and a model for injectors.  We’re going to discuss how to properly change the tune to compensate for new fuel injectors.

You should also take a look at the article on MAF Calibration as they often go hand in hand.

About Injectors on Ford ECMs

Ford uses the concept of injector slopes, breakpoints and battery voltage latency adjustment to cover the behavior of injectors.   Slopes represent the flow of the injector at high and low pulsewidths.  Breakpoints determine the pulsewidth required to switch from the low slop to the high slope.  Returnless fuel system cars add additional compensation tables related to fuel rail pressure.  When changing injectors, it is best to have a complete set of test data.

  • In many cases, injectors purchased from Ford Racing will include all of this information.
  • If you’re using a larger OEM injector (Cobra, Lightning, etc.) you can generally obtain valid data from the OEM calibration in which the injectors were used.  Example SXH1 08 GT500 48#, 01 Lightning CUX2 for 42#, 03 Cobra AMZ2 for 39#, 98 Cobra AOL3 for 24#, etc.
  • If you don’t have complete test data, you can make do.  You will need a wideband.  Recommended procedure:
    1. The rest of this procedure assumes you have a SOMEWHAT sane MAF transfer function.  If your MAF transfer is jacked, you may need to adjust, retune MAF then readjust a few times to get things properly aligned.
    2. Start with the data of the injector closest in size and design to the one you are using (slopes, inj latency, etc.).  If you can’t get any good data on other injectors, then your stock ones will do.  We will call this the “old” injector.
    3. Figure out what the injectors you are installing are rated for (i.e. 24#).  Remember the size of you old injectors (i.e. 19#).  Divide your NEW rated flow by your OLD rated flow.  Make sure your injectors are rated at the same pressure.  24/19 = 1.26 in this case
    4. Multiply both the LOW SLOPE and HIGH SLOPE by the value from above, in this case 1.26.
    5. Set your target AFRs / Open loop targets to a a UNIFORM value.  (i.e. 12.5 for a NA car)
    6. Do a WOT pass on the car.  Observe AFR.  Adjust BOTH high and low slope until actual AFRs resemble the target AFRs you have set up in your tune.
    7. Repeat #6 until the car is as close as possible to what you are commanding.
    8. Let the car idle.  Turn off closed loop if necessary.  Observe AFRs.   Adjust latency (battery voltage table) so that observed AFR is close to commanded AFR.
    9. Drive the car at low – light throttle.  Hopefully, Observed AFRs will be close to commanded AFRs.  If so, skip ahead to #11
    10. If observed AFRs differ significantly from targeted at part throttle, determine how badly they are off.  If they’re really far off, re-adjust in order to get things as close as you can.  After this, make SELECTIVE adjustments to the MAF transfer function at idle in order to achieve targets at idle while maintaining proper operation at light throttle.
    11. Once you have a preliminary set of slopes, latency values it is time to tune battery voltage tables.  First, observe battery voltage and AFR while IDLING.  At idle, the injectors are open the smallest amount of time so changes from battery voltage have the largest effect.
    12. Next turn on headlights, blower motors, brake lights, EVERYTHING you possibly can to put an electrical load on the motor.  Observe changes in battery voltage and AFR.  Make adjustments to the injector battery table in order to compensate for fluctuations.  I.e. if the car goes lean when you turn on the headlights, INCREASE the latency value at the voltage that the ECM reports with the lights on.
    13. Once you have the engine operating in a more consistent AFR range under electrical loan, rev the motor up and make sure that you don’t go too rich when battery voltage increases as a sanity check.
    14. At this point, you’ve probably done a more thorough injector calibration than most tuners will.

Nissan: 20×2 2Chip-64k ROM Board

About

These ROM boards are for Nissans that use a 64k program with a 20×2 header.  These boards require TWO 512k chips such as the C2 SST27SF512 chip that we sell or a 27C512.  They require the same ROM image to be burned into both chips.  They do NOT support switching between ROMs – single program only.  These do NOT work with Nissans that have 32k programs such as red-top S13 SR20DET, S13 KA24DE, etc.  These boards can be used with TWO Ostrich 2.0 emulators for realtime tuning.

Known Applications:

  • JDM “Zenki” S14a VVTi SR20DET w/ WC ECU
  • 95+ USDM Z32 VG30DETT
  • 94+ USDM J30 VG30

Pictures:

Nissan: NEMU+Nismotronic Tuning Package

About

The Nemu+Nismotronic Tuning Package is a complete, single-vehicle solution. High-speed datalogging, emulation, onboard storage, and advanced custom ROM options: these features are available nowhere else!

All the necessary ingredients for a complete turnkey tuning package are included:

NEMU Emulation and Datalogging Hardware:

  • Installs entirely within ECU, uses a single USB connection for logging and Emulation (No need for a consult cable!)
  • SUPER fast realtime emulation and logging (Uploads and Downloads)
  • 4MB Onboard Logging capacity
  • 4 Analog input channels for viewing any 0-5v sensor input (wideband, map sensor, iat, egt, oil pressure)

NismoTronic Tuning Software and User Interface:

  • RealTime Tuning and Logging via NEMU RT Boards
  • Onboard Logging via NEMU RT Boards
  • ADC Inputs for Wideband/IAT/ETC via NEMU RT Boards
  • User Definable Live Gauges, Graphing, and Monitor Tables
  • AFR Target Table (Target AFR) and Raw Table (Logged AFR)
  • AFR Difference Table (Difference in Logged vs Target AFR in percentage)
  • User Definable MAF curves! (Create your own custom MAF curve and save it into the MAF Data file to use on multiple tune files with just one click!)
  • Intuitive GUI with visual graphing. Tons of quick keys for quickly editing table values. Interactive 2D Graphing.
  • Innovate, AEM, PLX, and SLC Pure Wideband Support
  • Program Auto Update Feature
  • Import/Export Fuel and Ignition tables
  • Export Data Logs to CSV format for viewing in other programs (EXCEL, Virtual Dyno)

TunerCode VN5 Advanced ECU Firmware:

  • High RPM tuning limit (8012.5 rpm) removed.
  • Single-Table Fuel and Timing Maps.
  • Choice of soft cut or hard cut rev limits. Launch Control. Overboost rev limiter.
  • Soft cut Speed Limit (Can be disabled or set for valet mode)
  • Programmable A/C Compressor and radiator Fan controls.
  • Knock and Dwell control. Startup fuel and timing.
  • Accel, TPS, and CLT Enrichment. Injector size specification.
  • Decel Fuel Reduction, Idle fuel/timing, Fuel Cut control
  • Enable/Disable: Knock Analysis, Closed Loop O2 Analysis, Long Term Fuel Trim (self-learn), TPS fuel map load column contol, EGR, AIV, O2 Sensor Heater, A/C Compressor, etc.
  • Spark cut limiting, in addition to fuel cut limiting.
  • Set Launch uses throttle, tach., and gear shift to set launch rev limit
  • Programmable Outputs (5 trigger parameters, VVL, NOx, Fans, etc.)

Visual Tour

NEMU Package, in the box (click to enlarge)

Box contents: NEMU Unit, Hardware for installation in ECU, Breakout box and cable for extra inputs/outputs, USB bulkhead cable setup with mounting hardware.

NEMU installed in ECU, with one of our NISSAN2CHIP ROM boards sitting side-by-side for size comparison.

Nismotronic software screenshot

Troubleshooting

(Under construction)

Documentation

(Under construction)

SocketBooster 1.0 and 1.1

Introduction

The SocketBooster 1.0 exists to provide active conditioning for signals from our Ostrich2.0 and ChipExtender products.  In some circumstances, the logic levels generated by these devices do not meet the specifications of the target device you are trying to use them in.  The SocketBooster remedies this issue by essentially amplifying and conditioning the signal.  In many cases, the same effect can be achieved by using a short emulation cable, such as the 6″ EMUC2806 we sell.

Ostrich 2.0 Trace Feature with SocketBooster 1.0

The SocketBooster 1.0 interferes with the data trace feature on the Ostrich 2.0 on an electrical level.   However, one of our users reports that there is a fairly simple modification to get everything working again.  We have not verified this ourselves, but several users have reported success with tracing on a 27C32 application and a SocketBooster.

"The mod to get it going is to cut the CS & OE ribbon cable wires from the
O2, and solder them to the 2732A header on the socket booster via a 330R
resistor."

SocketBooster 1.1 revision

We revised the SocketBooster around November 2013 so it could be compatible with the trace feature of the Ostrich 2.0.  All units sold after this time should work without modification.  If you would like to upgrade your unit, please contact us.

Applications

The socket booster is REQUIRED for successful use of the Ostrich 2.0 or Chip Extender with 24-pin applications such as the GM TBI OBD1 C3 1227747 ECUs.

The SocketBooster also seems to help out with a lot of applications that use older Hitachi/Mitsubishi processors such as DSM, 8 bit Nissan Z31/Z32/R32, etc.  ECUs of this range are typically in the 84-91 year range.

Signs of Issues

The typical signs that your application may require a SocketBooster are intermittent ECM shutdowns, odd behavior, odd datalogging results, etc. Intermittent (or consistent) flaky behavior.

Installation and Use

The Socket Booster has a single switch on it which controls how the device operates.  The SocketBooster can either boost signals passing straight through it (28 pin setting) or act as a 24->28 pin converter (like the G2 we also sell) with the switch in the 24 pin position.  Although we do NOT recommend this, you can solder a SocketBooster directly into a 24 pin ECM by trimming the two pins closest to the switch and setting the switch to the 24 pin setting.

GM: TunerCat OBD2 Tuner

Introduction

TunerCat OBD2 Tuner is a software package that allows tuning of 96-current GM vehicles.  For some early 96-97 vehicles, it is often the only solution. TunerCat OBD2 Tuner must be purchased with our RoadRunner hardware (either with a complete RoadRunner ECM or just a RoadRunner Guts kit)  due to licensing restrictions.  TunerCat OBD2 Tuner also has an optional reflash cable accessory and software (“WinFLASH”) that allows vehicles to be flash programmed over the OBD2 port.  Existing users of TunerCat OBD2 software can use a RoadRunner ECM with the RTOBD2 upgrade.  This upgrade is only available to existing users of the TunerCat software.

Currently (3-26-2012) the TunerCat application suite is known to work under Windows XP, Vista and Win7.  There are compatibility issues with Vista and Win7 that can be addressed. (see below)  Currently, the software supports real time tuning with the RoadRunner on supported vehicles, reading and flashing over the OBD2 port. THERE IS NO BUILT-IN DATALOGGING APPLICATION. You must have a third party logger or scan-tool in order to have an effective tuning combination.  MX Scan used to work with older versions of the TunerCat reflash cable but it is NOT reported to work with current cables.

TunerCat OBD2 Tuner is licensed on a per-VDF (Vehicle Definition File) basis.  You can purchase each VDF individually or as a package including a group (LS1, All) of definitions and hardware together at a discount.  Each VDF generally covers multiple vehicles that use similar engine controllers.  Once you have purchased a VDF, you may tune as many vehicles of that type as you like – there is no per-VIN licensing.

Vehicle Support

The latest list of supported vehicles can always be found here: TunerCat ODB2 VDF files

As of the time of writing (3-26-2012), the following vehicles are supported:


Vehicle Definition
File P/N

Supported Vehicles

Trucks

OBD2_07


1996 – 97 Vortec Trucks (4.3L, 5.0L,
5.7L, 7.4L)


OBD2_06


1998 – 00 Vortec Trucks (4.3L, 5.0L,
5.7L, 7.4L)


OBD2_19

1999 -
00 Medium Duty Trucks (7.4L MFI Gas)


OBD2_03

2001 -
02 LS1 Trucks (4.3L, 4.8L, 5.3L, 6.0L, 8.1L)


OBD2_04

2003 -
05 LS1 Trucks (4.3L, 4.8L, 5.3L, 6.0L, 8.1L)


OBD2_14

2006
- 07* LS1 Trucks (4.3L, 4.8L, 5.3L, 6.0L, 8.1L)


(*only 2007 trucks with old style
PCM are supported)


OBD2_29

2002
- 05 L6 4.2L Trailblazer, Envoy, Bravada


OBD2_50

2007
- 08 V8 Trucks & SUVs (CAN Bus E38 ECM)


OBD2_51

2009
- 12 V8 Trucks & SUVs (CAN Bus E38 ECM except 2011-12 L96 6.0L
Heavy Duty Trucks)


OBD2_52

2007
- 12 V6 4.3L Trucks & SUVs (CAN Bus E37 ECM)


OBD2_59

2008 – 2009 Cadillac SRX 4.6L

2008 – 2012 Chevy Colorado 2.9L,
3.7L and 5.3L

2008 – 2009 Chevy Trailblazer, SS
4.2L, 5.3L and 6.0L

2008 – 2012 GMC Canyon 2.9L, 3.7L
and 5.3L

2008 – 2009 GMC Envoy 4.2L, 5.3L


2008 – 2010 Hummer H3, H3T 3.7L and 5.3L

V8 Cars
OBD2_08

1996 -
97 LT1 Corvette, Camaro, Firebird, Impala

OBD2_09 1997
- 98 LS1 Corvette, Camaro, Firebird
OBD2_01

1999
- 01 LS1 Corvette, Camaro, Firebird


1999 – 2001 Holden

OBD2_05

2002 -
03 LS1 Corvette, Camaro, Firebird


OBD2_20

2002 -
2004 Holden


OBD2_10

2004
LS1 Corvette

OBD2_12 2004
GTO
OBD2_13 2004 – 05 Cadillac CTS-V

OBD2_53

2010
- 12 V8 Camaro / 2009 – 2011 Corvette (except 2011 ZR1)

OBD2_55 2006 – 08 Corvette
OBD2_56 2008 – 09 Pontiac G8 V8
V6 Cars
OBD2_15 1996 Camaro/Firebird
V6
OBD2_16 1997 Camaro/Firebird
V6
OBD2_17 1998 – 1999 Camaro/Firebird
V6
OBD2_18 2000 – 2002 Camaro/Firebird
V6
OBD2_23 1996 V6
Chevy*/Buick/Pontiac* 3.1, 3.4, 3.8L
(*except
Camaro/Firebird)
OBD2_24 1997 V6
Chevy*/Buick/Pontiac* 3.1, 3.4, 3.8L
(*except
Camaro/Firebird)
OBD2_25 1998 – 1999 V6
Chevy*/Buick/Pontiac* 3.1, 3.4, 3.8L
(*except
Camaro/Firebird)
OBD2_26 2000 – 2001 V6
Chevy*/Buick/Pontiac* 3.1, 3.4, 3.8L
(*except
Camaro/Firebird)
OBD2_27 2002 – 2003 V6
Chevy*/Buick/Pontiac* 3.1, 3.4, 3.8L
(*except
Camaro/Firebird)
OBD2_28 2004 – 2005 V6
Chevy/Buick/Pontiac* 3.1, 3.4, 3.8L
(*2004/05 Grand Prix
not

supported)
Transmissions
OBD2_60 2007 – 2012 T42 Transmission
Controller – 4 speed Automatic
OBD2_61 2007 – 2012 T43 Transmission
Controller – 6 speed Automatic

Installation Tips and Troubleshooting

TunerCat OBD2 tuner relies on the same FTDI drivers that we use for the rest of our products.  If you suspect you have driver issues, please consult the USB Driver Troubleshooting Guide.

TunerCat does not always install and run cleanly under Windows Vista and Win7 without specific guidance.

Follow these steps:

  1. If you’ve already run the installers, first uninstall the program.
  2. In order for the programs to install correctly the installation program must be run in Compatibility mode. Before running the setup program right click on it. Select Properties from the list and then click the Compatibility tab. From there, pick the default (Windows XP SP2), click on the ‘Apply’ button and then click on the ‘OK’ button.
  3. Now double click on the setup program to install the program and follow the on-screen instruction to complete the installation.
  4. After completing the installation you’ll also need to set the OBDII RT Tuner program itself to run in compatibility mode. To do so, right click on the OBDII RT Tuner icon on the Desktop, Select ‘Properties’ from the pop-up menu and then click the ‘Compatibility’ tab. On the Compatibility screen click on the ‘Run the program in compatibility mode, select the default Windows XP SP2, check the ‘Run as administrator’ box, click on the ‘Apply’ button and then click on the ‘OK’ button. Then repeat this process or the WinFlash OBDII program.

Dev: Making new datalogging definitions for QuarterHorse

Introduction

Creating definitions for datalogging with the QH is a complicated, involved process.   Regardless of which software is being used, there is a common core set of tasks that need to be done to allow meaningful real-world data to get spit out.

Overview

Before I get into the specifics, it probably helps to understand how the QH works a little better.

The QH sits on the J3 port of the ECM, which is a bus connected to the processor.  On a stock ECU, both the external program memory (RAM) that stores active processor states and the internal program memory (“ROM”) which stores the strategy and calibration are present on this bus.  The QH overrides addresses on the bus allowing the processor to use RAM on the QH instead of ROM native to the ECM.  You can make changes while tuning by modifying the contents of RAM on the QH.  This is the same mechanism that F3/F5/F8 chips use to allow you change the program on the ECM.

The QH also builds a “shadow” copy of external RAM used by the processor by passively observing communication between the processor and RAM over the J3 port.  Where things get complicated is that not all RAM can be observed by the QH – a portion of it remains internal to the processor, unable to be seen by the QH.  Patch code exists to move or copy memory addresses that we care about from memory the QH cannot see to memory the QH can access, allowing you to log these items.  To reiterate – the QH doesn’t interfere or change communication between the processor and RAM on the ECM – it just observes all transactions, building a “shadow” copy of RAM that is used to supply logging data.

A Datalogging Definition, Dissected

In order to understand the software tasks involved in QH communication, we are going to examine a TunerPro ADX for the CBAZA strategy.  Other software follows the same steps to initialize and log from the QH, so you can read between the lines if you’re not using TunerPro.  The TunerPro definition is open so you can download it ( here ) and follow along because the whole initialization and logging process is broken down step by step.

Fire up TunerPro.  Load one of the existing Ford ADX files. (CBAZA.ADX)

Go to Acquisition menu… Edit Definition

Looking at the ADX Header Data, you will see 3 important commands:

  • Connection Command (run when you connect to datalog)
  • Monitor Command (run continuously while logging to gather data)
  • Disconnect Command (run when you disconnect)

Next, lets examine the Connection Command closer, as it has most of the magic in it.

Go to Commands… Configure QH for Payload.  This is a Macro command that simply executes a bunch of other commands:

  1. Pause for Data Rate (simple pause to let things settle)
  2. Write Patch Code (modify the ECU program to allow the QH to log all items – more on this later)
  3. Write Patch Response (wait for a valid response from the QH to the code modification)
  4. Config Part 1 of Q (configure the QH to watch the RAM locations we desire – more on this later)
  5. Config Reply to Q (make sure QH gives a valid response to the configure command)

Step #2 writes the patch code needed to move things we care about from private internal RAM to RAM the QH can snoop on.  This patch code is UNIQUE to each strategy.  It must be hand-crafted by someone with knowledge of the internal workings of the ford processor.

Step #4 configures which bytes of RAM the QH is monitoring.  The bytes used are unique to each strategy and are also dependent on how the patch code is written.

Continuing, logging happens by the Harvest Data Macro.

  1. Pause for Data Rate (this controls how fast the QH logs data, in hertz)
  2. Query (retrieve a frame of data, as configured by Config Part 1 of Q command)
  3. Data Packet (retrieve a packet.  fixed size is used here because the same packet is always configured by the Config Part 1 of Q command)

Datalogging values are defined relative to their spot in the packet you’ve requested in the format specified by the Config Part 1 of Q command.  Same deal for bitmasks.  Formulas for turning raw data into real world values can vary but are generally at least somewhat consistent among ECMs of comparable generations.

Summary

If you want to make a datalogging definition for a processor, you’re going to need to:

  • disassemble the code well enough to pinpoint RAM locations for things you care to log.
  • For any items that are stored in ram locations 0×0000 through 0×0100 (EECIV) and 0×0000 through 0×0400 (EECV ??? need to verify, may be different for 2 vs. 4 bank.  You can generally tell because private locations will always return the same data), you are going to need to write patch code to relocate these items to blank/unused space.  You can relocate items to either RAM or “ROM” space (because the QH gives read-write access via the J3 port to “ROM” locations stored in RAM on the QH) but you need to make sure NOTHING ELSE IS USING THE ADDRESS SPACE.  If you use RAM or “ROM” that is already in use for other things, you will end up with a processor that does not run properly!!!
  • build a definition including the patch code you’ve come up with
  • create an initialization macro for the QH specifying which RAM addresses need to be included in each data packet, using both stock and patch-code-remapped locations
  • do some analysis to come up with formulas for converting from raw values to real world data
  • build the data values using the formulas you’ve come up with and the packet structure you’ve specified with the QH initialization packet

I know that’s a lot to chew on, but the QH isn’t exactly a simple tool…  You can find more information about QH command structure by reading the Hardware Interfacing guide.  We’re always excited to have more people getting involved in the task of building definitions so feel free to email us if you get confused or stuck.

Memory Addressing – EECIV

Note: these addresses are for the QH’s addressing scheme.  If you want to use the 16 bit addressing of the ECU, lop off the MSB of 0×03 present in each one.  Ever wonder why chips get programmed from 0×032000 to 0x03FFFF ?

0×03 00 00 – bottom of memory
0×03 00 FF – top of internal 8061 MCU memory
0×03 01 00 – start of xram/others
0×03 1F FF – end of externally addressable memory
0×03 20 00 – start of ROM
0×03 FF FF – end of ROM

This PDF should be very helpful for understanding what is going on. (thanks Tom Cloud)

Tools

CATS Disassembler - a disassembler which can be used for the processor found in EEC-IV

Theory: BASIC Tuning Guidelines

Introduction

This article is being written to answer the most basic questions about what to shoot for when tuning an engine.  This is not intended to be absolutely what you must do – it’s intended to be a starting point for those who don’t know any better.

Prerequisitites

This article will assume you have read pretty much all of the Education section, particularly the article on Modes of Operation.  This article will assume you have a spark-ignition reciprocating piston 4-cycle (stroke) throttle-body fuel injected or multi-port fuel injected engine.  (If you aren’t familiar with these terms, click them!)

Basic Setup Guidelines

  • Make sure the ignition system is in good shape before trying to tune a vehicle.  Coil(s), wires, and spark plugs themselves must be in good condition.  Fouled plugs will ruin your day.  Improper heat range or gap will cause ignition issues that will ruin your day.  A rule of thumb is to go one step colder on plugs for every point of compression (i.e. 9.0 -> 10.0) OR half atmosphere of boost (7.75 psi)  and decrease the gap by one third (i.e. 0.045″ stock to 0.030″) for every step colder plug.
  • Make sure timing is correct.  “Timing” here means BOTH the mechanical connection between your crank and camshaft AND any adjustment of distribtor, CAS, etc. used to mechanically adjust ignition timing.
  • As dumb/obvious as this may sound, you cannot make adjustments on an ECU to fix a mechanical problem. Things like bent valves, damaged pistons, dead coils, defective injectors,  bad sensors, incorrect mechanical timing, etc. are not things that you can fix with a computer.
  • If the engine is operating in closed loop operation, it’s fueling behavior will be determined by the operation of the O2 sensor.  DO NOT TRY TO FIGHT THE O2 SENSOR.  Use the O2 sensor to guide your tuning activity i.e. try to get the ECM to make zero changes based on O2 sensor feedback
  • Do not try to tune WOT using a narrowband (lambda) style O2 sensor, which is the most common type.
  • O2 sensors can “lie” about the mixture.  LARGE camshafts and misfires are the most common culprits for this behavior because Oxygen sensors measure the Oxygen content of the mixture in order to infer lambda.   Large camshafts and misfires both cause “extra” oxygen to be present in the exhaust, which will cause a false lean reading.  If the ECM is operating in closed loop when this occurs, it will generally add fuel when no such trim is required.
  • If closed loop O2 feedback is working against you, turn it off.  If you have closed loop feedback turned off, you should monitor conditions with a wideband.
  • If you are dealing with a volumetric efficiency type system (i.e. TBI/TPI GM and others) it is a good idea to have your VE values resemble reality.  I.e. if you have 180% volumetric efficiency at idle to achieve stoich, this is bad.  Most “hot” naturally aspirated engines will achieve 85-95% VE, *in a narrow RPM range at WOT*  Some older engines with poor cylinder heads and manifolds will struggle to achieve a 80% VE.  Extremely modern engines will often see a peak VE close to 100% in places.  Motors almost always lose VE at low throttle angles/low MAP sensor readings due to pumping losses created by the restriction at the throttle body.  See the Speed Density article for more.
  • If you are dealing with a Ford that uses Load, it is a good idea to make sure your injector size resembles reality so your MAF transfer function and calibrated load values will resemble reality.  The MAF and LWFM articles cover this as well.
  • Looking at  a graphical representation of your tune should be a “pretty picture” not a bunch of noise.  Things aren’t going to be straight or perfectly smooth most of the time or you wouldn’t be tuning it but you should see trends.  It does not matter whether you are talking about a MAF or speed density or Alpha-N setup.  You should see clear trends.  The absence of trends or unexpected reversal of trends can often indicate a mechanical issue such as a fuel pump that has reached its maximum flow capacity, misfires, reversion, etc.
  • For measuring power, your butt dyno is wrong.  Use a repeatable performance measure, i.e. dyno, accelerometer, 1/4 mile track, etc.
  • Use all your senses particularly SOUND when tuning.

Basic Fueling Guidelines

  • Best emissions are generally achieved close or at stoichiometric.  This is generally around 14.7 AFR gasoline, or 1.0 lambda.
  • Best fuel economy is generally achieved between 15.5:1 AFR gasoline (1.05 lambda) and 16.2:1 (1.1 lambda) for port injected engines.  Newer cylinder heads with fast burn characteristics generally do better with leaner mixtues.  TBI setups generally need to run at least stoichiometric or richer.
  • Best power is usually achieved around 0.85 lambda (12.5:1 AFR gasoline) on modern cylinder heads.  Older heads generally require richer mixtures.
  • Forced induction engines run richer, mostly to combat knock.  How much richer will depend on the engine and conditions.  Except in rare cases, there is no benefit to ever running richer than 0.75 lambda (11:1 AFR gasoline)
  • Oxygenated fuels (Q16, E85, E98/Ethanol, Methanol, Nitromethane) require substantially larger volumes of fuel than “regular” gasoline.  If you have an option for stoichiometric ratio, use it.  If not, it is generally preferable to use injector constants / base pulse width modifiers instead of MAF transfer/VE to tune this out.
  • Almost all widebands on the market read in lambda but convert this to an AFR value for gasoline (where 14.7 AFR = 1.0 lambda) to display it.  If you are burning hexane, this is fine.   If you are running any other fuel, think of the desired lambda you wish to achieve and convert this lambda value to AFR gasoline.  I.e. target an AFR of “11.2 :1″ to achieve a lambda of 0.77 with E85 at ~7.4 :1 AFR.
  • Most pump gasoline as of 2012 in the US is at least 10% ethanol, which means that a true stoichiometric mixture is closer to 14.1 than 14.7.
  • Summer and Winter gasoline blends can have dramatically different ethanol contents, especially in colder climates.  Different octanes and brands of gasoline can have a large variation.  Although somewhat outdated, see the gasoline faq for a more in depth discussion of fuel composition and why it matters.
  • If you are tuning the vehicle with closed loop O2 feedback disabled, make sure you tune such that the ECM will not have to make big changes to achieve its targets when closed loop is turned on.  This boils down to shooting for around 14.7 AFR (1.0 lambda) in areas where closed loop will operate.
  • Get AFRs around idle as smooth as possible in open loop without any feedback or idle troubles will happen.  Do not rely on closed loop to maintain fueling at idle.

Basic Ignition Guidelines

  • Your ECU expects the distributor/CAS/other-adjustable-timing-thing to be in a certain spot.  ALWAYS SYNCHRONIZE YOUR TIMING WITH A TIMING LIGHT BEFORE DOING ANYTHING ELSE!@#!#!!!
  • Mechanical factors (mostly combustion chamber volume, shape and design) are the primary factors determining optimal timing requirements.  Optimal timing is often referred to as “MBT” or Mean Best Timing.
  • Most naturally aspirated engines like to run between 24 and 36 degrees of advance @ WOT at RPM-of-peak-HP
  • It is often not possible to achieve MBT due to the engine knocking first.  Knock will destroy even the strongest engine.
  • Higher compression motors need less timing than lower compression motors.  Higher compression motors are more likely to be knock limited.
  • Forced induction motors need less timing as boost increases.  Forced induction motors are more likely to be knock limited.
  • Aggressive camshafts generally let you run closer-to-optimal timing than smaller camshafts.
  • Race gas and higher octane fuels generally allow closer-to-optimal timing.
  • At a fixed RPM, the engine will generally require less timing at higher load.  I.e. more throttle less timing
  • At a fixed RPM and load, the engine will generally require more timing with a leaner mixture.  (One reason to run a slightly richer mix is that you don’t need as much timing to effectively burn it.  There are plenty of exceptions to this and too rich can be a big problem too.)
  • At a fixed load, the engine will generally need more ignition advance as RPM increases until around maximum horsepower where timing requirements generally flatten.
  • Spark at idle is critcally important for maintaining a stable idle and not having stalling issues.  Too much spark will generally result in hunting/surging.  Too little will generally result in stalling or lumpy idle.  Spark control at/near idle is extremely manufacturer (and sometimes even ECM) specific.
  • You can tune ignition timing to some degree by reading plugs but instantaneous acceleration data and/or a dyno while monitoring knock is the best way.
  • The trap speed of a 1/4 mile run will tell you about power output but it will not tell you about specific RPMs, just overall performance.
  • Your “butt dyno” is totally inaccurate.

Troubleshooting: APU1 / AutoPROM

Introduction

The AutoPROM is a complex device and it can be confusing to get up and running.  This guide is intended to get you to the point where you are connecting to a vehicle and able to use its functions.  Before continuing with this guide, make sure you have the computer that you wish to use with the AutoPROM and the AutoPROM itself handy.  For the remainder of this guide, we will use the terms “APU1″ and ‘AutoPROM’ interchangeably.

Basic Connectivity

The AutoPROM uses a USB connection to talk to your PC.  It uses the same FTDI drivers that all of our other products use.  The first step in getting the AutoPROM working is to get your PC to recognize it.

  1. Turn on the computer you want to use with the APU1 and plug the APU1 in to a free USB port.
  2. Follow the instructions in the USB troubleshooting guide to ensure the device is recognized by Windows.
  3. Although it is mentioned in the guide above, make sure the APU1 is using a COM port between 1 and 8!  This is CRITICAL for some older software.
  4. The rest of the troubleshooting guides in this guide will assume that you have basic USB connectivity.

A Visual Guide

The APU1 has a lot of switches that controls how it behaves and it is critical to get the switches in the correct position for the device to work.  The following picture gives an overview of the switches and what they do.  (Click to enlarge)

APU1 Legend Picture

Each way you can use the APU1 will now be discussed.  Refer back to the picture above if you are unclear from the description in each section.

Using the APU1 as a Chip Programmer

The APU1 can be used to program chips.  It functions almost identically to the BURN1/BURN2 products that we sell, using the same software and procedures.

  1. Make sure the APU1 is connected to your PC and has a COM port between 1 and 8
  2. Make sure the 28 pin ribbon cable used for emulation is UNPLUGGED from the unit. Unpredictable behavior can result from the APU1 being directly connected to a ECM using the emulation cable while burning chips.
  3. Make sure the outer horizontal switch is ‘towards the USB port’ position. (APU1 mode. Other position is passthrough mode, identical to ALDU1).  Chip programming software will NOT be able to connect to the AutoPROM unless this switch is set correctly!!!
  4. Fire up TunerPro RT or Flash n Burn software.  Your APU1 should be recognized and you should be able to program chips.
  5. If the APU1 is not recognized by software, try moving the mode selection switch again.  Verify the the USB is being recognized correctly.

Using the APU1 as an Emulator (realtime changes)

The APU1 can be used as a real time chip emulator.  It functions almost identically to the Ostrich/Ostrich2 products that we sell, using the same software and procedures.

  1. Make sure the APU1 is connected to your PC and has a COM port between 1 and 8
  2. Make sure there is nothing in the ZIF socket.  Emulation will NOT work reliably unless the ZIF socket is empty!!!
  3. Make sure the outer horizontal switch is ‘towards the USB port’ position. (APU1 mode. Other position is passthrough mode, identical to ALDU1).  Emulation software will NOT be able to connect to the AutoPROM unless this switch is set correctly!!!
  4. Fire up TunerPro RT or EmUtility software.  Your APU1 should be recognized and you should be able to upload a tune to it.
  5. If the APU1 is not recognized by software, try moving the mode selection switch again.  Verify the the USB is being recognized correctly.

Datalogging while using Emulation at the Same

The APU1 can be used for datalogging while simultaneously performing chip emulation.  When used in this manner it is the most capable tools that we sell for tuning OBD1 GM Vehicles.

  1. Make sure the APU1 is connected to your PC and has a COM port between 1 and 8
  2. Make sure there is nothing in the ZIF socket.  Emulation will NOT work reliably unless the ZIF socket is empty!!!
  3. Make sure the outer horizontal switch is ‘towards the USB port’ position. (APU1 mode. Other position is passthrough mode, identical to ALDU1).  Chip programming software will NOT be able to connect to the AutoPROM unless this switch is set correctly!!!
  4. Fire up TunerPro RT or Flash n Burn software.  Your APU1 should be recognized and you should be able to upload tunes.
  5. If the APU1 is not recognized by software, try moving the mode selection switch again.  Verify the the USB is being recognized correctly.
  6. Next, make double check TunerPro’s configuration for logging.  Start by going to Tools…Preferences
  7. Next, Tab over to the Data Acq. /Emulation tab. (red arrow)  Make sure that “AutoProm/MAFTPro” is selected for Interface Type.

    APU1 tunerpro settings

  8. Make sure you have the correct XDF and ADX file loaded for your vehicle, plug everything in and give it a go!
  9. If you have trouble connecting, check the other switch on the APU1.  Older applications that use 160baud require the in/up ”10k across A-B” setting.  Later TPI, LTI and TBI applications use 8192 baud which requires the switch to be in the out/center =”open between A-B” position.  If you just want to check codes, the down position will cause codes to flash.

Using the APU1 for Logging Only

As you have seen above, the APU1 is a versatile device that can be used for many purposes.  However TunerPro is the only software that knows how to use any of the advanced features of the APU1, so it is necessary to put the APU1 into a “pass through” mode when using other software.  In these cases, the APU1 functions solely as an ALDL logging interface.

  1. Make sure the APU1 is connected to your PC and has a COM port between 1 and 8.  It will be necessary for you to know which COM port the APU1 is using to configure it properly.
  2. Make sure the outer horizontal switch is ‘away from the USB port’ position. (Passthrough mode, identical to ALDU1. Other position is APU1 mode for TunerPro.)  Legacy software will NOT be able to connect to the vehicle unless this switch is set correctly!!!
  3. We’re going to walk through the TunerPro RT configuration steps to use this mode.  Your APU1 will NOT be recognized by TunerPro RT software in this mode.  If you’re not using TunerPro, skip to step 9.
  4. If the APU1 is recognized by software at startup, try moving the mode selection switch again.  Verify the the USB is being recognized correctly.
  5. Next, make double check TunerPro’s configuration for logging.  Start by going to Tools…Preferences
  6. Next, Tab over to the Data Acq. /Emulation tab. (red arrow)  Make sure that “Use Plug-in” is selected for Interface Type.  Make sure “TunerPro Data Acquisition I/O Interface” is selected under the component drop down box.
  7. Then click the “Configure Plug-in Component” box (green arrow).
  8. Make sure that “Standard Serial” is selected (green arrow) and the COM port of your APU1 is selected (blue arrow)
  9. If you are NOT using TunerPro RT, you should be able to start your software of choice and configure it to use the COM port of your APU1 (COM2 in this example)
  10. If you have trouble connecting, check the other switch on the APU1.  Older applications that use 160baud require the in/up ”10k across A-B” setting.  Later TPI, LTI and TBI applications use 8192 baud which requires the switch to be in the out/center =”open between A-B” position.  If you just want to check codes, the down position will cause codes to flash.

“First Edition” AutoPROMs

Very early editions of this unit feature a different switch configuration.

These units have a horizontal switch and a vertical switch.

For the horizontal switch, outbound is passthrough mode and inbound is APU1 mode.

The vertical switch has three positions.  It controls the behavior of the datalogging interface, much like the inner switch on newer models. 10k is the up position, open is the middle position, and short (check codes) is the down position.

Support: Information we need

Our support email box gets a lot of messages that are loosely of the form:

“IT DOESN’T WORK!”

Unfortunately, this does NOTHING to help us help you figure out what is going on.   The following ten questions should give you a reasonable guide to what we need to help you solve the problem at hand.  (Feel free to copy and paste this and use it verbatim as the beginning of your emails to support@moates.net )

  1. What kind of vehicle(s) ? (Year, make, model)
  2. Which engine (stock / replacement) ?
  3. Which ECM / ECU (Part number, catch code, ID sticker, etc.) ?
  4. If known, which strategy/mask/operating system/codebase on ECM?
  5. Which Moates.net hardware are you trying to use?
  6. If you are using non-Moates hardware, which?
  7. Which software application are you trying to use?  Which version?
  8. Which definition(s) for your particular vehicle are you using?  Where did you get them?
  9. Did things stop working (i.e. they worked in the past) or have they never worked?
  10. Is this problem something that happens every time (consistent) or just sometimes (intermittent) ?

TunerPro V5: Converting ADS to ADX format

Among other things, TunerPro RT brings a new definition format, the ADX.  This is an extended version of the previous file format, ADS.  The file formats are NOT compatible, but you can convert between them fairly simply.  Unfortunately, the automatic conversion utility in TunerPro isn’t perfect so this guide exists to help you achieve success.

  1. Open TunerPro v5.x
  2. Go to Acquisition … Import Definition … From ADS
  3. Point TunerPro at the ADS file you wish to convert.
  4. When prompted, choose a filename for the new ADX definition (this filename doesn’t really matter, just remember it)
  5. Go to Acquisition … Load Definition and point it at the file you just saved.
  6. Go to Acquisition … Edit Definition
  7. In the editor window, click on the plus next to Commands and then click on Transmit Data Reply
  8. Make sure the “Body Size (Dec)” item is 67.  In many cases, it will incorrectly get set to 66 by the automatic conversion tool.
  9. Click ‘Save’ and you’re done!  If you ever load this definition in the future, it will be ready to go.

Fake 27SF512 Chips!

We’re Seeing Lots of Fake Chips!

TLDR: If it seems too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true.  If the seller is in China and the chips cost less than $3 each, they’re probably fake.

Update March 2014:  This is now totally out of control.  Less than 10% of the results searching eBay for “SST27SF512″ were genuine chips.  They’re now coming in all sorts of shapes, sizes, markings.  The majority of these chips are ONE TIME PROGRAMMABLE chips that have been re-marked to look like the erasable and re-usable SST chips – this means you can program them, ONCE.  After that, the chips will never erase or program again.  Real SST27SF512 chips can be erased and re-used hundreds if not thousands of times.

Increasingly often, we’ve been seeing problems programming chips with the BURN1/BURN2/APU1 because of COUNTERFEIT CHIPS!!!  The 27SF512 chips are no longer being made and have not been in production for quite some time.  (~Aug2009)  I guess we shouldn’t be surprised that counterfeits of these popular chips are now common because Moates purchased the entire final production run of these chips, leaving nothing but counterfeits for other vendors to sell.

Bottom line: If the SST27SF512 chips you purchased did not come from Moates.net, Xenocron.com or one of our other re-sellers, they are probably fake because the legitimate supply of new chips from SST was sold years ago.

Identifying Real Chips

Fortunately, most of these counterfeit chips are fairly easy to spot:

  • Most use a white silkscreen print on the top of the chip NOT the laser-etched found on the real deal chips.
  • Most have printing on the bottom of the chip instead of  ‘TAIWAN’ embossed in a circle.

Here are some pretty decent pictures of a GENUINE chip for comparison: (click images for full-size)

Fake Chip Gallery

As we receive more pictures from our users of fake chips, we will post them here.

Note the size and placement of the round “dimples” on this fake chip.  Note the whitish silkscreened letters instead of the laser-etched letters.  This is not a real 27SF512 chip.

Note the size of the “dimples” on the bottom of this fake chip.  Note the writing in the center of the chip.  Note the absence of “TAIWAN” in one dimple and the chip ID in the other.  This is not a real SST27SF512 chip.

I’ve seen at least two examples of this fake chip in the past month. (October 2013) They seem to be circulating ebay.  Again, there is a printed NOT laser-etched top, easy to spot and tell:

fakesst1

 

And “TAIWAN” should not be printed in big letters on the bottom:

fakesst2

Honda Chipping Kit Install: SMD for JDM/Small-Box ECUs

You will need bridge J1 on the back of the ECU.

Add C49 & C50 and C91 & C92 on back

C49 & C50 –> .004UF (Digikey part number 399-1230-1-nd )

C91 & C92 –> .00001UF ( digikey Part Number 399-1192-1-nd )

Add the 74hc373 SMD chip. (MFG part# SN74HC373NSR, Digi-Key Part Number 296-8310-1-ND)

Add a 29C256 eprom with bin written to it.

For RTP/Datalogging w/ Crome remove J4 on front.

Solder in a 4 pin header (snappable header pins 1×40 work GREAT for this and are VERY cheap)

All info is from the following threads:

http://forum.pgmfi.org/viewtopic.php?t=3112&highlight=chipping+jdm+computers

Special thanks to all the contributors of the above thread and katman for doing the pics in the first place… We love you katman :)

http://forum.pgmfi.org/viewtopic.php?t=4005&highlight=chipping+jdm+computers

Thanks to infotechplus for pics and info on C49,C50,C91,C92

BURN1+F2A+F2E: Reading Ford ECMs

Requirements

There are two products that we sell that can read the program in a factory ECM:

BURN1/BURN2 with a F2A and F2E – This setup can be used to read ECMs on the bench.  ECM does not need to be powered.

QuarterHorse – This setup requires the ECM to be powered either by a vehicle’s battery or a 12V bench power supply.

Reading with BURN2+F2A+F2E

  1. Start with all cables disconnected (F2A,F2E,USB,etc.)
  2. Connect the F2E to the F2A
  3. Put the F2A in the BURN1/BURN2
  4. Connect the Burn1-2/F2A/F2E Assembly to your ECM.  Make sure your ECM is powered off if it is in the vehicle
  5. Connect the USB from the BURN2 to the PC
  6. Start Flash n  Burn Software on the PC
  7. Choose appropriate settings for the Supported chip type based on the ECM type:  J3 Ford EEC-IV Reader or J3 Ford EEC-V Reader
  8. Choose appropriate settings based on the number of banks used:
    • 56k EEC-IV = 032000 start 03FFFF end
    • 64k EEC-IV = 030000 start 03FFFF end
    • 2-bank EEC-V = 010000 start 02FFFF end
    • 4 bank EEC-V = 000000 start 03FFFF end
  9. Click “Save buffer to file” and choose a filename.

Reading with QuarterHorse

At the time of writing (Aug5-2010) Binary Editor is the only software that supports this feature of the QH reliably.  Select “Read PCM” from within the software.

Ford Tuning: Load with failed MAF table(s)

Introduction / Prerequisites

Before you read this, make sure you have read Theory: Alpha-N, Theory: Mass Air Flow and the FordOverview.  Although not essential, it wouldn’t hurt to have at least read about Speed-Density operation as well.  This page will assume you have read and understood these pages.  This is a somewhat complicated topic and will require you to put several pieces together so don’t feel bad if you have to read this a couple times.

About the table and why it is critical

The “Load with failed MAF” (“LWFM” from here forward) table(s) are found in almost all MAF Ford Strategies.  Most strategies that make use of IMRCs (Intake Manifold Runner Control – valves that restrict air entering the engine in order to increase tumble and velocity) have two LWFM tables instead of one and  switch from one LWFM table to the other as the IMRCs open and close.  The main purpose of the LWFM table is to estimate the amount of air going into the engine without using the MAF sensor or a MAP sensor (if present) to provide the ECM with an “emergency” fallback method of running the engine in the event the MAF sensor fails.

The LWFM table is also important for normal operation of the motor because Load from the MAF (this is “Load” – the Ford-specific calculated cylinder filling value calculated from the MAF sensor, RPM and engine displacement) is “sanity checked” against the LWFM table to determine if the MAF is providing reliable information.  If there is too large of a difference between calculated Load and the LWFM table, the ECM may ignore the MAF even if it is providing valid information! This happens most commonly in forced induction situations (where load is greatly increased compared to a naturally aspirated car) but can also occur in cars with aggressive camshafts.  If you are making changes to a MAF transfer function and you are not seeing any changes in engine operation, double check your LWFM table!  Further, most strategies use “Anticipation logic” to predict airflow.  This prediction logic is based off…  Surprise… The LWFM table!  Having a sane LWFM table is neccesary for the aircharge anticipation logic to work.  You can disable this but it’s generally not necessary if you tune the LWFM table properly.

LWFM table is a classic example of an Alpha-N control strategy – it’s purpose is to provide a very crude estimation of airflow entering the engine when the MAF signal is absent or the ECM thinks it is unreliable.   The LWFM table uses only two inputs – throttle position (aka “TP”) and RPM to determine Load.  Here is a picture of a typical LWFM table: (screenshot from Binary Editor / GUFB strategy)

Here you can see the X axis is RPM and the Y axis is RELATIVE Throttle Position volts.  Each cell represents the Load that will be used to calculate fueling and timing when the ECM thinks the MAF is bad.  For example, idling with the throttle closed (0 volts relative)  around 700 RPM the ECM will assume a Load of .1602 and make appropriate fueling and timing changes.

The importance of the LWFM table varies considerably from strategy to strategy.  A rule of thumb is that the newer of an ECM you are using the more picky it will be able the LWFM table.  Fox Body and most early EECV (pre-99) are fairly tolerant of inappropriate LWFM tables where 99+ ECMs are generally much, much, much more picky.

Tuning the LWFM Table

Tuning the LWFM table is pretty simple:

First, set the Aircharge WOT multiplier, Anticipation logic scalars, etc. to make the ECM as tolerant of a bad failed MAF table as possible

Second, GUESS!   Yes, guess.  Enter values that you think are sane for the setup, starting with the stock LWFM table as a guideline.  A few examples:

  • If you put in aggressive cams, decrease the LWFM table at low RPMs and throttle angles while increasing it at higher RPMs and throttle angles.
  • If adding a positive displacement supercharger (roots, twin screw) multiply the whole LWFM table by approximately the highest pressure ratio you will see.
  • If you add a centrifugal blower, multiply a column of the LWFM table by the pressure ratio you achieve at a given RPM

Third, drive around and log throttle position (TP Relative), RPM, Load.  Compare the Load values you log with the LWFM table.  Start changing entries in the table so they get closer to the load you really see at given TP and RPM conditions.

Note: Turbo cars present a very big challenge to this strategy due to the amount load can vary with throttle position due to spool time.  This is a very tricky case and often the only solution is to try and maximize allowed error before the LWFM table becomes active and also disable Aircharge Anticipation and other functions dependent on the LWFM table.

Tuning: MAF systems, air leaks and reversion

Introduction

As stated in our overview of MAF systems, one of their main weaknesses are air leaks.  Whenever air can enter the engine without going through the MAF, weird things happen.

There are two principal kinds of leaks that wreak havoc on MAF systems – constant leaks (like a unplugged vacuum port) and mechanically induced leaks (such as a Blow Off Valve or Bypass Valve that vents to atmosphere.)  Each leak has a tendency to affect the system differently.  In this article, we will try to take a look at what “should” be happening, what changes with a leak and what kind of odd things you can look for while tuning to identify a leak.

Reversion presents an additional problem for MAF systems.  Reversion is the technical name for when air changes direction and reverses flow.  MAFs are not one way systems – they will measure air flowing into the engine and then meter the same air flowing out of the engine when there is severe reversion, causing unreliable MAF readings.

Constant leaks

This kind of constant leak in a MAF system is the classic “vacuum leak” where a gasket, coupler or piece of tubing in between the MAF and the engine does not seal properly.  In this case, air can enter the engine without passing through the MAF.  Because air has entered the engine without passing through the MAF sensor, the MAF sensor reads artificially low.  An engine operating in open-loop mode will tend to run very lean.  A motor operating in closed loop will see very large positive trims as the computer uses the O2 sensors to add fuel to compensate for the lean condition.

The air leak provides more air for the engine at idle which will make the idle rise or sometimes “hunt” or bounce around unstably.  Generally, the idle system will also try to compensate.  On Fords you will see the ISC Integrator (“Integrator”) swing negative, indicating the ECM is allowing less flow through the idle valve than is commanded in the tune.  It is very common for the Integrator to get stuck at the minimum allowed value and have the car still idle higher than commanded.

Most MAF systems use the MAF for calculating appropriate timing values as well as fueling.  With a vacuum leak throwing off the system, the ECU thinks there is less air entering the engine than their really is.  This will mean that “load” values will be artificially low, which generally leads to timing being artificially high.  In severe situations, this combination of issues (less fuel, more timing) is a recipe for melting engine components if it goes unchecked.

Mechanically induced leaks

Bypass valves are the most common source of mechanically induced leaks although idle, purge and other vacuum operated solenoids can all be a problem.  MAF systems require these valves to be re-circulated so that air leaving the valve re-enters the intake AFTER the MAF so it does not get measured twice.

Blow off valves on turbocharged vehicles are often vented to atmosphere.  This unfortunately will severely confuse a MAF system.  When the valve opens, air that has already passed through the MAF and been “counted” is released into the atmosphere instead of entering the engine.  The ECU will supply enough fuel for all the air that has passed through the MAF while only a small portion of this air actually entered the engine.   This causes the engine to run very rich and can cause stalling or other problems when letting off the gas and the BOV opens.  Once the valve closes again and the car burns off the excess fuel delivered, things slowly return to normal operation.

Supercharger bypass valves can present the same kind of issues when they are allowed to vent to atmosphere. (or when there is a leak in the piping allowing air to recirculate.)  Failing to catch an air leak with a supercharger bypass will result in the MAF curve having a sudden change when the valve closes.  This will require complete re-tuning of the MAF transfer function once fixed so it is best to catch it early.

Reversion

Reversion is most common in engines with very large camshafts operating at low speeds such as close to idle.  Situations where MAFs read unreliably due to reversion can generally be greatly improved by moving the MAF further from the throttle body.  Increasing the volume of the intake between the MAF and the throttle body is also effective at smoothing out the pulses of air coming from an engine with a radical camshaft.  It is normally possible to get a reliable enough MAF signal in most circumstances.  Even extremely wild cams that draw 3-4″ of vacuum at idle can be tamed with an appropriately designed intake system.

Another form of reversion that is troublesome to MAF systems happens with poorly designed supercharger bypass valve systems.  In most of these systems, the pipe connecting the outlet of the bypass valve connects with the inlet of the supercharger at an angle where recirculated air flows backwards through the intake.  This causes any reverse-flowing air to be metered multiple times by the MAF, leading to unreliable operation.  This can almost always be remedied by adjusting the angle of the pipe from the bypass so it points at the inlet of the supercharger directing the flow of recirculated air away from the MAF.

Reversion is very obvious if you are logging the MAF signal. Looking at a graph of a “normal” MAF signal versus time, it will look like a line that could have been drawn without reversing the direction of travel.  The same graph of a MAF impacted by reversion will look very “shaky” and jagged, changing direction many times in a short period of time.

Ford: Box code – strategy – vehicle cross reference

This page is intended to help people who have looked here to figure out if there is support for their vehicle.

Each ECM has a 3 or 4 digit processor code that uniquely identifies it.  You can tell what strategy a ECM uses from its box code or from looking at a dump of a stock program from that ECM.  “Strategy” is Ford’s lingo for a program to run a vehicle. (or operating system)  Each strategy can have multiple calibrations for different engines.  Sometimes even V6 and V8 engines will use the same strategy!

If you are wondering if your strategy is supported, take a look at the Supported Strategies guide.

This list will grow over time.  If you don’t see your vehicle listed here, email support@moates.net

A9L = GUFB (88-93 “Fox body” V8 mustang 5-speed)

A9P = GUF1 (88-93 “Fox body” V8 mustang auto)

T4M0 = CBAZA (94-95 SN95mustang  5.0 V8)

LLX4 = CDAN4 (96-97 Cobra 4.6L 32v)

PTP2 = FBFG2 (04 Mustang GT)

RCX5 = CDAN4 (97 Tbird 3.8L v6)

SLL4 = CTBAE (96 5.0 explorer ??? )

LKT3 = ODAJ0 (02 F150 4×4 auto)

SCI1 = ODAG0 (02 F150 4×4 manual)

NMI1= ODAG0 (02 F150 4×4 manual)

MIJ1 = ODAG0 (02 F150 4×4 manual)

KVF1 = ODAL1 (02 F150 4×4 manual)

CXN1 = MNAE1 (01 Lightning)

CUX1 = MRAD2 (01/02 Lightning)

CUX2 = MRAD3 (01/02 Lightning)

URB1 = TAUF0 (02/03 Lightning)

There is a handy Excel spreadsheet you may want to look at ( link ) that has a decent cross-reference.

Who uses our gear?

This page is being created so we have a place to keep track of all the people who are using our gear for various applications.  If you would like to be added or removed from here, please email support@moates.net or leave a comment.  Hit control-F to find keywords on this page as eventually we hope this grows to a very large list!

ECU Connections forum – mostly Bosch Motronic stuff.

DS-MAP – MAP sensor conversion for DSM ECUs, supports Ostrich

TunerPro RT – general purpose ROM editor that supports APU1, Ostrich, ALDU1 and most of our gear.  Useful for Nissan, Ford, GM, DSM, some Bosch Motronic (BMW, Porsche, VW, etc.) among others. (we sell this)

ThirdGen.org – forum dedicated to the 3rd gen camaro/firebird with a great Tuning section!

EFI Live – Supports our RoadRunner Emulator for OBD2 GM vehicles (we sell this)

Binary Editor – Supports our QuarterHorse emulator for 86-04 Ford vehicles (we sell this)

EEC Editor – Supports our QuarterHorse emulator for 86-04 Ford vehicles (we sell this)

TunerCat – supports APU1, ALDU1, Ostrich, etc. for OBD1 GM vehicles

Neptune – supports Demon, Ostrich, BURN2,  etc.  The premiere solution for tuning 92-01 distributor Hondas (we sell this)

eCtune – supports Demon, Ostrich, BURN2, Hondalog, etc.  Another great 92-01 distributor Honda solution

Crome – supports Demon, Ostrich, BURN2, Hondalog, etc.  an older and poorly maintained 92-01 distributor Honda solution

TurboEdit – supports Ostrich, Hondalog.  an old and finicky software package for 88-91 distributed Hondas

BRE – supports Ostrich, Hondalog.  an old and finicky software package primarily aimed at 89-91 Vtec hondas

Pgmfi.ORG – Home of the DIY Honda community.  Birthplace of CROME, TurboEdit, BRE and loosely affiliated with other softwares.  Still a great resource for Honda ECU tuning.

Nistune – supports Ostrich, dual Ostrich.  Nissan ROM tuning software, dealer version works with our hardware.  Programs made with Nistune work with our Nissan 2Chip adapter.

Tuning Porsche 944 turbo vehicles using TunerPro, Ostrich, SocketBooster (thanks Joshua)

Turbo Mopars using Ostrich2

RhinoTuning using Ostrich2 / BURN2/ etc. for tuning Suzuki Swift pre-OBD2 vehicles

Nissan Data Voice uses the Ostrich2 for realtime tuning for OBD1 Nissan vehicles

EmUtility: standalone emulator control

Introduction

Ever wish your favorite Moates emulator would work with your favorite ROM editor software that doesn’t have native support for our products?  EmUtility (from the author of TunerPro) allows you to use Moates emulators with any software that can spit out a binary (bin) or hexadecimal (hex) format file.  It supports the Ostrich1, Ostrich2, APU1 *and* RoadRunner!  It can even support more than one emulator connected to the same computer simultaneously. (this requires more than one instance of the program, one for each emu)

Installation

You can get EmUtility from the Utilities section of TunerPro.net

EmUtility may require additional files to be installed for it to work, specifically the Microsoft Visual C redistributable libraries, which  are also linked off the Utilities section of TunerPro.net

EmUtility does not come with an installer – it is shipped as a zip file with a single program file inside.  Unzip it to place where you will be able to easily find it, such as your desktop.  You can run it directly from the desktop and it will not make a “mess” because it is only one file.

Usage

EmUtility is pretty straightforward to use.

First, start the program.  You should see “Detecting Hardware… Ostrich 2.0 blah blah blah” for instance.  If you see “No Hardware Detected” check your cables and connections.  If you cannot get your hardware to detect, try looking at our USB Troubleshooting Guide.

After you have verified that your hardware has been detected properly, click the “…” next to “Input / Output File” to select a file to use.  (If you are going to read the contents of the emulator to a file, this can be a new file)

Next select an operation from the drop down box next to “Operation”  Valid operations include:

  • Read from emulator to file = creates a new file on your computer with the contents of emulator RAM.  Must specify a filename, how much memory you want read (size), if you want to use a non-standard start address (File Start Address)  and if you want to use large RAM support (required for files > 512kbit / 64k byte)
  • Write from file to emulator = updates the RAM on your emulator with the contents of a file on your computer.  Must specify a filename  and if you want to use large RAM support (required for files > 512kbit / 64k byte).  File size and start address will be automatically selected for you and will be correct in most cases where your file is the same size as the chip you are trying to emulate.  (i.e. 32k byte file for 27C256 chip)
  • Verify emulator RAM with file = compares the contents of the Emulator’s RAM with a file on your computer to see if they match.  Must specify a filename  and if you want to use large RAM support (required for files > 512kbit / 64k byte).  File size and start address will be automatically selected for you and will be correct in most cases where your file is the same size as the chip you are trying to emulate.  (i.e. 32k byte file for 27C256 chip)
  • Monitor File for changes and upload = this operation monitors a file for changes and uploads the changes to your emulator as they happen. ust specify a filename  and if you want to use large RAM support (required for files > 512kbit / 64k byte).  File size and start address will be automatically selected for you and will be correct in most cases where your file is the same size as the chip you are trying to emulate.  (i.e. 32k byte file for 27C256 chip)

After you have selected and configued the operation you desire, click “Execute” to perform it.  To cancel a monitoring+upload session or other op, click “Cancel Op”

That’s it!

Suggested Uses

If you have a program that can spit out bin files but it does not support Moates hardware:

  1. Start EmUtility
  2. Pick “Write from file to Emulator”
  3. Point EmUtility at the file you are working with
  4. Click “Execute” to load the initial file
  5. Change the operation to “Monitor file for changes and upload”
  6. Click “Execute” to begin monitoring the file for changes
  7. Leave EmUtility running in the background.  Go back to your editing application.  Make changes and save the file (with the same filename).  As you save changes to the file, EmUtility will copy them to your emulator almost instantly!

Nissan 16 bit applications with TunerPro 4.x: (using a daughterboard like our Nissan 20×2 that takes two identical chips and two Ostrich 2.0 emulators)

  1. Plug in ONE Ostrich and follow the directions immediately above to set up monitoring for an application that does not support Moates hardware.
  2. Leave EmUtility running and connect the second Ostrich.
  3. Start TunerPro.  It should detect your second Ostrich.
  4. Start your emulation session in TunerPro.
  5. Tune away.  TunerPro will update one Ostrich, EmUtility will update the other

(Note: TunerPro 5.x supports dual Ostrich mode which is easier to set up than this)

16 bit Nissan applications such as 925style.com’s ROM  EDITOR (using a daughterboard like our Nissan 20×2 that takes two identical chips and two Ostrich 2.0 emulators)

  1. Plug in ONE Ostrich and follow the first set of directions above to set up monitoring for an application that does not support Moates hardware.
  2. Leave EmUtility running and connect the second Ostrich.
  3. Start a SECOND COPY of EmUtility.  It should detect your second Ostrich.
  4. Repeat the instructions for loading a binary and starting monitoring in the second EmUtility session
  5. Tune away!  As you save changes to the file, each instance of EmUtility will update one emulator.

Using the RoadRunner as a general purpose 16 bit emulator with software that does not have native support (i.e. Bosch Motronic 28Fxxx):

  1. Start EmUtility
  2. Pick “Write from file to Emulator”
  3. Point EmUtility at the file you are working with
  4. Click “Execute” to load the initial file
  5. Change the operation to “Monitor file for changes and upload”
  6. Click “Execute” to begin monitoring the file for changes
  7. Leave EmUtility running in the background.  Go back to your editing application.  Make changes and save the file (with the same filename).  As you save changes to the file, EmUtility will copy them to your emulator almost instantly!

Demon

demon1

Introduction / Identification

The Demon (or original Demon, Demon 1) pictured above  is the first of our integrated devices aimed at Honda/Acura-friendly P28/P30/P72 OBD1 ECUs. Flawless realtime emulation, embedded datalogging, auxiliary ports, 16x calibration storage and encryption.   The Demon is designed to fit inside both USDM and JDM ECUs including those with knock boards.   The Demon combines the features of the Ostrich, Hulog, RTP, and adds its own unique feature set.  The Demon requires software to specifically support many of its features – not all software support is equal.

Ports and Connectivity

The Demon uses the same FTDI Device drivers as the rest of the products that we sell.  The Demon a USB mini-B port for internal cable connection.  Plugging a cable from the Demon to your PC will allow your PC to communicate with the unit.
The Demon supports additional devices through the black 4 pin add-on header, which is an option to install.  Some examples of devices that can be used are the TunerView II, TunerView RD1 and BlueTooth serial modules.
***IMPORTANT***  The original Demon and Demon II **DO NOT** have the same pinout!  It is entirely possible for damage to occur if incorrectly pinned peripherals are plugged in to the Demon!  Please make sure you have the correct cables to support the hardware you have.  If you have any doubts, please contact us.
If using the 4-pin TTL with devices such as the Demon/Tunerview interface, TunerView RD1, or Bluetooth, be SURE that the pinout is:
Demon1: 1=TX out, 2=RX in, 3= GND , 4= 5V out

Software Support

As of 11/03/09 software support is as follows:
Neptune: Full emulation+data+onboard (release)
ecTune: Emulation+data (release)
Crome: Emulation+data (beta)
Please note that each Demon has a serial number – NepTune and eCtune both license a single copy of the software to a single Demon.  The exact procedure for this is different for each software package.

Datalogging Memory

The first production runs of Demons have 1 Mbyte memory for storing datalogging.  Current (starting around April 2010) production units have 4Mbyte memory.  Early production units can have their memory upgraded.  If you are interested in this service, purchase the Install Service item and note in the “Comments” field of your order that you would like the Demon memory upgrade.  You’ll have to send your Demon back to us – turnaround time is normally about 2 weeks.

Switching Between Software

You can now more easily switch among the different applications using our Config Utility for resetting the state of your Demon.

Indicator Lights (1.8 and older firmware)

The Demon has two LEDs to indicate its status, one red and one green.

The red LED serves as a hardware status indicator and/or busy light.  It can come on when:

  • Demon is currently processing a command (upload/download/etc)
  • Poor / nonexistent connection between Demon and ECU 28 pin socket.  (usual cause: faulty installation)
  • Poor / nonexistent connection between Demon and ECU CN2 port.  (usual cause: cabling, cable backwards, faulty installation)
  • Demon is powered via USB but there is no power to ECU
  • NEPTUNE RTP ONLY: No serial communication between ECU and Demon
  • Red LED will blink when onboard packets are being stored to memory

The green LED is more of a data packet and status indicator light.  It typically behaves as follows:

  • Lights up solid green when the Demon is powered on
  • Blinks when the Demon is communicating with the ECU (assuming data packets are configured correctly)
    • Fast blinking means data is flowing properly from ECU to Demon via CN2
    • Slow blinking likely means data timeout / incorrect connection/configuration

 

Indicator Lights (1.9 and newer firmware)

Light behavior has been changed in the new firmware.

The red LED serves as a hardware status indicator and/or busy light.

  • Red light on solid = not receiving power from the ECU: physical connection issue to ECU
  • Red LED will blink when logging packets are being captured

The green LED is more of a data packet and status indicator light.  It typically behaves as follows:

  • Solid green light when the Demon is powered on and all systems are go but no packets are being received
  • Green light is off when the device is busy OR Demon is powered off
  • Fast green blinks mean the Demon is receiving good datalogging packets from the ECU.

Troubleshooting:

  • Red light onwith USB plugged in means the Demon is NOT receiving power from the ECU.
    • You will only see this condition when the Demon is being powered by USB
    • Check 28 pin socket bridge pins and connection
    • Check ECU CN2 – 4 pin port connection.  This is REQUIRED for proper Demon operation
  • Green light off means no power to ECU.  Red on / green off is expected with no power.
  • No lights at all when USB is plugged in generally is a fault condition.
    • Try removing the Demon from the ECU.  If the Red light comes on, check the chipping job and physical connections between the Demon and the ECU

O-Meter

O-Meter
The O-Meter’s physical dimensions are 2.500″ x 1.625″ x 0.800″Check out the documentation to understand what all this unit can do! Does AFR/Lambda/Universal display, data storage, etc. Fully user configurable through two easy-touch buttons. Available in red (brighter) or blue (not as bright but looks cool!). Blue is a little more because of the parts cost.

Here is the instruction guide for the O-Meter so you can read about all the features:
http://static.moates.net/zips/ometer_guide.pdf

Here is a video of the O-Meter in action:
http://static.moates.net/zips/ometer_1.mpg

Here are pictures of how to hook up the wiring between the O-meter and the LC-1:

http://static.moates.net/gallery/ometer_wiring/

Ostrich 1 Operation

Ostrich
Here’s how you install the Ostrich:  (Much of this will apply to the Ostrich 2 as well but pictures will be different.)

1) Get on the website here in the ‘software and drivers’ section and download and unzip the ‘USB Drivers’ file. Remember where you put it.

2) Plug the Ostrich into the USB port of your PC, and point the operating system to the previously located USB Driver directory and install the drivers. See the USB Driver Installation Guides here on www.moates.net for further guidance in this regard.

3) Go into the drivers and set the COM port of the USB to Serial Converter (under Ports in the Device Manager of the Windows Control Panel). Set it to COM3 or COM4. Override any warnings against ‘port in use’ or any of that nonsense. Again, refer to the USB install guides for more info.

4) While in the port settings, set the latency to ’1′ (default=16). This will speed it up dramatically.

5) Use TunerPro RT or a similar program to upload a binary to the Ostrich, and verify that it is uploaded correctly.

6) Hook it up to the vehicle, and go to town. When installing the ribbon cable where the chip normally goes, orient the red stripe so that it faces where the chip notch or arrow (pin #1) would normally face.

Note: If you have the car off, and the Ostrich is hooked up to the car’s ECU, then sometimes an upload/verify won’t work right. Just turn the car on, or disconnect the Ostrich during the initial upload, and everything should be fine.

There are jumpers inside the Ostrich, depending on how many pins / memory size you are emulating to.
The following pictures illustrate three different ones: 24, 28, and 32-pin. The 32-pin is only used for Ford EEC-V applications right now.

24-pin (with associated pictures for an installation where the original chip was a 2732A in a 1227747-style GM ECM):
Here’s the jumper settings, set for 24-pin emulation:

Here’s the socket that is soldered in the ECM. Note the direction of the notch (to the right) indicating where the original chip pin #1 would go:

Here’s one way to do it, first right before insertion and then after it is snapped down in. Really it is preferable to use a ZIF socket here. Notice the 24-pin socket that is stacked onto the bottom of the regular 28-pin emulation cable. You can just use the 28-pin with the extra 4 pins hanging over as well. Note the red stripe toward where the notch would normally go:

28-pin Installation using the G1 chip adapter, similar to that used in a 1986-92 TPI GM ECM:
Check out the jumper settings. Note that this is the configuration that the Ostrich is shipped with, and works for the majority of the applications.

Note the direction of the notch on the chip, despite the direction of the ZIF handle. This is counter-intuitive for many, and is relatively unique to the G1 / TPI-style adapter due to spatial constraints in the ECM housing:

Now we take the chip out, and put the emulation cable in. Note the red stripe and how it is oriented compared to the notch on the chip that was there before:

32-pin Jumper Settings, presently only used for EEC-V applications:

Honda Chipping Kit Install

This is Keebler65′s old guide. Some of the chipset and software info is a bit dated, but the techniques are good.

ECU Chipping

You need to add a few additional components to the original Honda ECU. It requires some soldering skills and should not be attempted unless you have soldered before. (Chances are you know someone with soldering skills that could help you). Here is a picture of the P28 ECU that I chipped, before any of the parts were put in:


Before you can solder the parts in, you will need to de-solder the holes in the circuit board since they come filled with solder from the factory. You can buy a “solder sucker” to do the job, however unless you get a nice one (expensive) they don’t really work well in my opinion. The cheap and easy solution is to buy some solder braid. It’s just braided copper. Simply place it over the hole to be de-soldered, and place the soldering iron on top of the braid. It will then wick up the solder into the braid. It’s available at radioshack:


You’ll want to use a decent quality soldering iron to get the job done nicely. The important thing is to not use too much heat, and also make sure the iron has a fine tip on it. I’m using a standard Weller iron:


Here is what it should look like after the board has been de-soldered:


The parts that need to be added are boxed in with a dashed white line. The parts consist of (2) .1uF ceramic capacitors, (1) 1k resistor, (1) wire jumper (simply a piece of wire…I used a lead of the resistor), (1) 74HC373 chip, and (1) 29C256 chip (thats the EPROM). The resistor and capacitors have no polarity, so you don’t have to worry about installing them backwards. The 74HC373 chip does have a polarity. Pin 1 will be on the left side of the pic (you’ll see in detail later one). The same is true for the EPROM chip. Since it would be impossible to burn a chip and have the tune be perfect, it becomes obvious that you don’t want to solder the chip in. Instead, use a socket so that it can be removed. You have two options: for less than $1, you can get a standard DIP socket. The problem is these are very hard to insert and remove the chips since there are 28 pins (it requires a lot of force and is hard to grip the chip). Your second option would be a ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket, which costs less than $10. It is a socket that has a lever: pull up the lever, set the chip in/lift it out, and flip the lever back – VERY nice to have since you’ll be doing this many times while tuning. Be careful when ordering the ZIF socket, as many of them are too large to fit on the board without running into things. The first ZIF I bought was made by Aries, and it was a very quality piece, however, it was too large and bulky to fit without a lot of modification to other components on the board. I ended up ordering a different one that was much more compact. I am unaware of the brand, however it is blue and is referred to as a low-profile ZIF. The only problem was that the lever end of it was in the way of the 74HC373. The easy solution is to buy a standard DIP socket as mentioned above. Solder this onto the board. Then, stack the ZIF onto this socket, which raises the ZIF away from the board enough to clear the surrounding parts. This setup worked very well for me. The following picture shows the too-big-to-fit ZIF in the back-left, the low-profile ZIF in the front left, and the DIP socket on the right:


The ZIF socket stacked on the DIP socket for added height:


And finally, a couple of pics with all of the parts installed:



I ordered most of my parts from www.jdr.com except for the low-profile ZIF socket and DIP socket, which I obtained from www.jameco.com. The following table containse the exact part numbers that I ordered. You’ll notice that I ordered two EPROMS. This way, it will be easier to burn one while the other is installed.

Part Number Quantity Description Source
29C256-12PC 2 This is the chip that you burn with Uberdata JDR
74HC373 1 The other chip that is reqired JDR
R1.0K 1 1K resistor JDR
.1UF 2 .1uF capacitors JDR
102744 1 Low profile ZIF Socket Jameco
40336 1 28 Pin DIP socket Jameco

Additionally, I have recently located all of the parts you will need from one source. DigiKey is where you can find them. Their inventory selection can be overwhelming, so here are the part numbers you will want:

Part Number Quantity Description
AT29C256-70PC-ND 2 This is the chip that you burn with Uberdata
MM74HC373N-ND 1 The other chip that is reqired
1.0KEBK-ND 1 1K resistor
478-4279-3-ND 2 .1uF capacitors
A347-ND 1 Low profile ZIF Socket
A409AE-ND 1 28 Pin DIP socket

And for a final update to this page, I’d like to add that you can find ALL of the necessary chipping parts at moates.net. It is a great deal in my opinion, and you’re guaranteed to get the correct parts the first time around. It’s under the name of “Honda ECU Chipping Kit”.

Bluetooth Install on Ostrich

Bluetooth
For the Ostrich2, the following will show you how to install the Bluetooth into the unit:
1) Open the Ostrich (two screws), keep track of the two nylon spacers.
2) Gather up the Bluetooth kit parts as shown in the pictures below.
3) Place the pin headers on the Bluetooth module and snap them on, and then solder it in place as shown.
4) Screw the unit back together (no cleaning necessary) and connect using Bluetooth software (separate tutorial available).
For the original Ostrich, look here:
Ostrich BT Install Pictures
Basically, it is as follows:
1. Remove jumper caps and install shielded angle header.
2. Install module.
3. If you want to go back to USB, then REMOVE bluetooth module and you can put the jumper caps back in place.

HULOG/HondaLog Installation

Hulog/Hondalog
Installation of Honda-Based USB Datalogging Tools

There are two tools available for datalogging on Honda ECUs from www.moates.net and they include the HULOG and the HondaLog.

HULOG: The HULOG comes in a plastic enclosure and ONLY requires a pin swap if it is an older unit. All the new units come with 1:1 connector pinning, so will differ from the pictures shown in that no pin swap is required or will be present on the extension cable. It can be mounted externally or internally, depending on whether you want to pass the 4-pin header cable or a USB cable out of your ECU.

HondaLog: The HondaLog can be mounted directly to the ECU with no interconnecting cable It can also be mounted at the end of a 4-pin tether cable. Either way, no pin swap is required (note color of wires and their order in the pictures). The unit is shipped with two pinning options in terms of the attachment header. It also comes with a piece of shrink-wrap tubing in case you want to ‘wrap that rascal’ when you’re done. Either way, it goes to your USB cable and PC on the other end.

Pictures are shown below for the two units. The installation header is a 4-pin latching unit, and comes with the moates.net Honda Chipping Kits. You can alternatively use a 4-pin 0.025″ square-post breakaway header. Please take note of the directionality of the latch on the interconnecting cable though, since that is critical.

HULOG Pictures



HondaLog Pictures



Honda Tuning with Crome Tutorial

Honda Tuning with Crome
This is a very nice PDF tutorial written up by Darren Kattan. Check it out by clicking HERE.

G3/GP3 Configuration and Use

G3/GP3
The ‘G3′ Switching Adapter
(also: Using the ‘EX’ with the G3)
For placing several different binaries on a single chip for GM applications, the G3 adapter is the hot ticket. By ‘stacking’ the binaries on a large-sized memory, and using the included switching ability, you can swap between different programs on-the-fly while the car is running. You could have ‘Valet’, ‘Economy’, ‘Nitrous’, or whatever else you want to put together.

First a little background. A memory chip is accessed by changing the state of various connections or pins. Some of the pins are called address lines. They tell the chip which data to present. There are low address lines (A0 through A14) and high address lines (A15 through A18). The larger chips like the AM29F040 have A0-A18, or 19 address lines. What the G3 adapter does is take ‘manual’ control of the address lines A15-A18. If you study binary stuff, you’ll know that this will give you 16 different memory ‘banks’ which can be selected.

On the G3 are several components, including one thermofuse (looks like a capacitor) to protect against shorts when using the ‘EX’ module, four capacitors which help dampen RFI pickup from the EX cable, two jumpers to set the operating modes (see below), and a rotary DIP switch to select which bank of memory is to be accessed.

Installation instructions for the G3 adapter are very similar to those for the ‘G1′ adapter, so see the section under ‘G1′ instructions for guidance in this regard.

Think of the G3 as an old-style channel selector on a TV. You just turn the knob, and the car’s ECM will see a different channel or ‘bank’ of memory. Put the switch to position zero, and all the ‘high’ address lines will be set to 5v. Thus, the actual memory location that will be accessed on a 29F040 will be 78000-7FFFF. If the switch is set to position ‘F’, then all the high address lines will be set to GND, or ‘low’. In this case, the reference memory will be 00000-07FFF. You can see how this lets you put up to 16 programs on a single chip and select between them. The switch positions are numbered 0-F, which is just hexadecimal for zero through 16.

There are several different hardware configurations which are possible with the G3. This increases flexibility along with the confusion factor. Let’s look at these combinations individually:

1) Putting a 29F040 chip in the G3, and operating with an ECM that originally takes a 27C128 (16k bin) or 27C256 (32k bin). This gives you 16 bins.
2) Putting a single 29C256 or 27SF512 chip in the G3, operating in ‘passthrough’ mode with no switching.
3) Putting a 29F040 chip in the G3, and operating with an ECM that originally takes a 27C512 (64k bin). This gives you 8 bins.
4) Putting a 27SF512 chip in the G3, and operating with an ECM that originally takes a 27C256 or 27C128. This gives you 2 bins.

The most typical cases are (1) and (2), so we’ll talk about them first.

For operating instructions on the ‘EX’ module, see the bottom of this page.

Case 1:
Originally a 27C128 or 27C256, use a 29F040 chip to switch between 16 programs.

First thing you will want to do is ‘assemble’ your big 512k binary from a group of smaller ‘stock-size’ binaries that you create or collect. The screenshot shows the configuration screen in ‘TunerPro’ under the BIN stacker function whereby the proper settings have been selected.

Notice how the bin size here is 16k (originay a 27C128) and the chip size is 512k (for a 29F040). The switch size for the Case-1 hardware configuration is 32k. This is going to create a 512k fie that you can then burn directly to a 29F040 chip without any offsets. Also note that TunerPro does the BIN order reversing for you, so all you need to worry about is which switch position is associated with which BIN.

The jumper positions for this Case-1 are such that both jumpers should be placed in the ‘down’ position as shown in the picture. This will allow full access to a 29F040 chip’s memory banks via the switching with bank sizes up to 32k. Make sure the notch on the chip is facing to the left as shown.

Case 2:
Originally a 27C128, 27C256, or 27C512 chip, use a 29C256 or 27SF512 chip as a single-program pass-through application.

If you want to use the G3 as just a straight adapter and not a switcher, this can be done very easily. Just program the chip as you normally would for a single-program application and put it in the adapter.

Only trick is to make sure that you set the jumpers to the ‘up’ or 29C256 position. This will allow the G3 to act just like a ‘G1′ adapter, passing the signal directly through and bypassing the switching functionality. Make sure the chip is moved over to the right, with the notch facing left.

Case 3:
Originally a 27C512 chip, use a 29F040 chip to switch between 8 programs.

Now we’re getting to some more ‘flexible’ appication of the G3. For this case, the jumpers should be set as shown, with J1 in the ‘down’ or 29F040 position and J2 (right) in the ‘up’ position. You still stack your BINs using the TunerPro Bin Stacker, but the settings should be such that your Bin Size=64k, Chip Size=512k, and Switch Size=64k.

When switching in this mode, there will be a little difference. In this mode, position 0-1 are the same and 2-3 are the same and so on. So, in terms of which BIN you will be accessing, you’ll be seeing BIN0 in positions 0-1, BIN1=2-3, etc through BIN7=E-F. This gives you 8 binaries you can put on the chip and select from, with a switch occurring every ‘other’ switch position.

Case 4:
Originally a 27C128 or 27C256 chip, use a 27SF512 chip to switch between 2 programs.

OK, so you don’t want to run 16 different binaries? Just two? Here’s an option for you. Set up your BIN in TunerPro again, with the Bin Size=16 or 32k, chip size=64k, and switch size=32k. Set the jumpers with J1 in the ‘up’ position and the J2 in the ‘down’ position. This will allow the A15 line to get switched every other switch position.

When operating in this mode, the first bin will be accessed at switch positions 0,2,4,6,8,A,C,E and the second BIN will be accessed in the other positions. This gives some switching flexibility without the confusion of millions of binary files.

That’s about it in terms of G3 operation. Again, the installation is pretty much the same as for the G1 so see that section for instructions in that regard.

Using the ‘EX’ module:

The function of the ‘EX’ module is that of a remote BIN switching device and display indicator. When used with the G3, the ‘local’ G3 rotary switch should be placed in the ’0′ zero position!

If you want to have a ‘AntiTheft’ or ‘Valet’ mode, you should put that binary in position zero, so you can disconnect the EX and carry it with you. It can be unplugged from the ribbon cable at any time. Don’t worry about plugging it in backwards. It won’t short out, it just won’t work right and won’t light up. If it lights up with the car on, you’ve got it right.

 

That’s all there is to it!
Confused? Me too.

HDR1

HDR1
Instructions for using the ‘HDR1′ Memory Header

The HDR1 memory adapter is primarily designed to download the existing code from a stock Memcal.
It can be used for other things as well. For instance, if you want to use a UV eraser on your stock Memcal and then reprogram it without tearing stuff up, the HDR1 allows this to be done very easily.

Step 1: Take the stock Memcal (or whatever) and identify where the pins come out for the existing EPROM.

Step 2: Insert the HDR1 into the Memcal and note the orientation of the existing chip.

Step 3: Place the assembly into your favorite chip reader / programmer (AutoProm shown, chip notch facing ZIF handle, empty spaces nearest to handle).

Step 4: Go ahead and read or re-program the chip.

That’s it! No mess, no fuss. Pretty straightforward.

G2 Adapter Installation

G2
G2 TBI-Style 2732-to-29C256 Adapter Installation Instructions:Here is a pictorial depiction of a G2 installation in a TBI-style ECM.
It shows the following:

1) Disassembly and removal of stock socket body.
- Take note of the ‘stock’ 2732A chip orientation. Your 2732A chip will probably be in a little plastic holder.
- Try and overcome the challenge presented by the disparity between that fact and this pictorial guide.
- Take apart the ECM case, loosen screws that hold ‘daughterboard’, and get everything free so you can get to the underside.
- Be careful with ribbon cables which are often glued to the ECM housing areas.
- Measure spacing between row of chip socket pins, and make sure you order the correct adapter part (0.6 or 0.45″).
- Using small screwdriver, gently pry plastic off of pins. It should come free, leaving pins to be desoldered individually pretty easily. This may not work as well with 0.45″ spacing sockets, and you might have to desolder the whole socket at the same time or mutilate it a little bit to get it out.

2) Desoldering of stock socket pins, removal of solder from holes using solder sucker.
- Apply heat and remove each individual pin (assuming you were successful with step (1).
- Use solder sucker to open up each hole for acceptance of the ‘new’ socket.

3) Soldering in place of a 24-pin collet-pin DIP socket. (For 0.45″ spacing, 12-pin SIPs are used instead).
- Just like it says. If you want a very low profile install, skip this step and go to step (4), except solder it in place instead of pressing it in.

4) Placement of G2 adapter along with optional ZIF and associated chip.
- Just like it says.

5) View of relative clearance and reassembly.
- Check and make sure it’s not going to hit anything when installed back in the car. If you have clearance issues, you might want to consider the solder-in option mentioned in (3-4).

Note that the height can be reduced by not using the ZIF socket, and can be further reduced by soldering the adapter directly in as mentioned (bypassing the DIP or SIP socket install).

These pictures should give you the information you need with respect to procedures, relative socket / adapter / chip orientation, etc.
However, if after viewing this you still have questions, just let me know at my email address on the main page and I’ll do my best to field them.

Have fun!

File Uploads and Downloads

Our file manager is no longer available for access due to a website crash.  Almost all of the content is available at the excellent forums http://www.gearhead-efi.com

You can also click this for a direct link to the files section: link

RoadRunner: EFI Live with RTACS

Notes from EFI Live’s Paul Blackmore regarding using the auto-tuning feature of EFI Live with Moates hardware:

  1. Check both axis of the VE table in the tuning tool to make sure the MAP and RPM headings (the ones colored sky-blue) have link PIDs associated with them. The link PIDs are usually displayed as {Link: SAE.MAP} and {Link: SAE.RPM}.

  2. Check that the units displayed for the MAP link pid are exactly the same as the units specified in the Scan Tool for that PID.

    You can change the units of the VE table’s MAP axis using the menu option: Edit->Configure display units…

    You can change the units of the MAP PID in the Scan Tool by displaying the [PIDS F8] tab page, right clicking on the SAE.MAP PID and selecting Imperial or Metric so that it matches the units in the VE table.

  3. Make sure you start logging (red button) or monitoring (yellow button) in the Scan Tool. Otherwise real-time data will not be sent to the tuning tool’s VE table and RTACS will not work.

  4. Make sure the cells you want RTACS to update are not “protected”. Protected cells are displayed with a white background.

  5. Set the accuracy in the [RTACS] tab page of the VE table to 0. That will turn off EFILive’s auto protect feature when EFILive “thinks” the cells are accurate enough.

  6. Make sure the Col, Row and BEN factor PID values are displayed and updating with the expected values in the [RTACS] tab page of the VE table.

  7. Make sure the min and max RTACS limits in the [RTACS] tab page of the VE table are set far enough apart so that values can be modified.

  8. Make sure the “RTACS is NOT active” changes to “RTACS is active” when you expect RTACS to be working.

Here’s more text from a recent email:

The most important part of the RR auto tune is to make sure the calculated BEN factor PID you are using is correctly calculating the error between the commanded v’s actual (i.e. wideband measured) AFR. The error is displayed as a numerical value that represents the percentage error between the two values.

———————————————————————————–

The BEN factor is calculated as (actual AFR) divided by (commanded AFR).

A value of 1.00 indicates that the commanded AFR matches the actual AFR

A value less than 1 indicates that the actual AFR is less than the commanded AFR by the fractional part of the value. i.e. if the value was 0.95, then the difference is 5%, if the value was 0.90 then the difference is 10%, if the value was 0.87 then the difference is 13% etc.

A value greater than 1 indicates that the actual AFR is greater than the commanded AFR by the fractional part of the value. i.e. if the value was 1.05, then the difference is 5%, if the value was 1.10 then the difference is 10%, if the value was 1.13 then the difference is 13% etc.

The RTACS software multiplies the existing VE value by a percentage of the BEN factor, the percentage is based on coarse/fine settings.

———————————————————————————–

When the border turns red that indicates that the logged data is currently being discarded because it did not pass the filter(s) that you have in place.

———————————————————————————–
You should also make sure the PCM is operating is open loop to prevent the PCM from fighting against you and adjusting the long/short term fuel trims while you are trying to tune. You can force open loop by increasing all values in B4205 (Closed Loop Temp Enable) to greater than the coolant temp will ever get. That will prevent the PCM from entering closed loop.

Hope this helps!

Roadrunner: Hard Resets

When you set up a Roadrunner in a vehicle, you will often need to force a ‘hard reset’ of the Roadrunner PCM. This is particularly true if you are using a custom OS or changing OS type.

For using EFI Live, perform the following:

  1. Open up the software, and get the EFI Live Roadrunner Control Panel. Make sure the Roadrunner serial number is being displayed.
  2. Upload the whole new Operating System and Calibration from the PC *.tun file to the Roadrunner device.
  3. Select the “Execute from PCM Flash Memory (if equipped)” option (two chips with arrows in between). This will turn the Roadrunner emulation ‘off’ in order to blank out the PCM RAM when the memory read faults. The software should display ‘Flash’ as the mode of operation.
  4. Re-select the button, this time selecting the ‘Emulation’ mode of operation.
  5. Turn the key or power to the PCM off, wait 10 seconds, and turn it back on.
  6. If you like, at this point you can open the EFI Live ScanTool software (make sure cable is connected and vehicle is on). You will probably want to scan for codes and DTCs, and clear them all as appropriate.
  7. Start the vehicle briefly (1-2 seconds) and then shut power back off. This is primarily to reset the idle relearn, so it typically not an issue with the drive-by-wire configurations.
  8. You should now be able to restart the PCM and vehicle, and things should work as expected if you are using a valid *.tun file.

This procedure will also help if you have suffered tune corruption.

If you have any questions, contact EFI Live or Moates technical support and they’ll be glad to help further.

Programming Chips Using Offsets

How to use offsets when programming chips:

If the chip you are programming is of a larger capacity than the binary file you are putting on it, you typically need to use an offset with respect to chip addressing. This option is shown in the TunerPro RT program under ‘Moates Prom I/O’.   The Flash n Burn software has an almost identical set of screens.  We will use TunerPro RT and Flash n Burn interchangeably for the rest of this document because they operate very almost exactly the same.  To program a chip, proceed as follows:

1. Ensure that all programs on the PC are closed then connect the AutoProm or Flash & Burn unit. If using a serial version of the AutoProm, connect its power supply.

    If using an AutoProm, make sure that it is disconnected from the car’s ECM.

2. Once the unit is connected, start up the TunerPro RT/Flash n Burn program. You should see at the bottom of the window a message like “Connected: AutoProm 2.5.A” or “Found BURN1 …” or something similar. If this is not shown, and you instead see “Hardware Not Found”, then your computer cannot talk to our hardware. If using an AutoProm, there is a switch on the back (black horizontal) of the unit which needs to be placed in the ‘toward the middle of the unit’ position. If it is in the ‘toward the outside’ position, then the chip burning and emulation functions will not work. If the switch is correct or you are using a BURN1/BURN2, the problem is probably drivers. Take a look at this guide for more information on how to resolve driver issues.
3. Assuming that your hardware has been detected, you are now ready to put a chip in the unit. Place the chip such that the chip notch or arrow is oriented in the same direction as the ZIF socket handle, which should be toward the cable connections. Also, make sure that the chip is positioned away from the ZIF handle, so that the empty holes in the socket are present at the handle end. The orientation and positioning of the chip in the socket is CRITICAL, so make sure that this is correct. See pictures on website for clarity.

4. If you are using TunerPro, look under the ‘Tools’ menu item and select the ‘Moates Prom I/O’ option. If you are using Flash n Burn, you should already be looking at this menu. In this menu you will need to do the following

    in the correct order:
  1. Select the type of chip you’ll be programming from the drop-down menu. This will likely be either the AT29C256 or the 27SF512.
  2. Pick the ‘Load file to buffer’ option, and navigate to the file you want programmed on the chip. Select it, and it will be loaded to memory on the PC. Take note of the file size indicated in the message window. It will likely be one of four sizes: 4k, 16k, 32k, or 64k (kbytes).
  3. In the top right part of the window you will see the offset values that need to be changed. The file size along with the chip size will determine what offsets you need to use. (Flash n Burn usually automatically selects sane offsets based on your chip type and file size.) When you change the offset values, you will notice that other values will change automatically.
      It is critical that the correct values are filled in for all four boxes before programming the chip.

    You may have to go back and re-enter values depending on the order you enter them. The following table summarizes what offsets you need to use depending on chip used and file size:

    File Size
    Chip
    Buffer Start -> End
    Chip Start -> End
    4k (4096)
    AT29C256
    000000 -> 000FFF
    007000 -> 007FFF
    16k (16384)
    AT29C256
    000000 -> 003FFF
    004000 -> 007FFF
    32k (32768)
    AT29C256
    000000 -> 007FFF
    000000 -> 007FFF
    4k (4096)
    27SF512
    000000 -> 000FFF
    00F000 -> 00FFFF
    16k (16384)
    27SF512
    000000 -> 003FFF
    00C000 -> 00FFFF
    32k (32768)
    27SF512
    000000 -> 007FFF
    008000 -> 00FFFF
    56k (57344)
    27SF512
    000000 -> 00DFFF
    002000 -> 00FFFF
    64k (65536)
    27SF512
    000000 -> 00FFFF
    000000 -> 00FFFF

    As you can see, the buffer (or file content) will be placed at the ‘end’ of the chip.

  4. Once you have selected the proper chip, the proper file to use for the program content and the proper offsets you are ready to program the chip. If using a 27SF512 chip, you must ‘Erase Chip’ first! This is not needed with the AT29C256. Go ahead and select the ‘Program Chip’ option. Follow this action with a ‘Verify’ command to make sure everything programmed correctly. You should get a ‘Success’ notice.

Using Switching Adapters

Using our switching adapters (G2X, G3, GX, TwoTimer) requires programming chips using offsets.

More will follow – Coming soon!

Discounts for Shops, Resellers, and Group Buys

Shops and Resellers:

If you are interested in purchasing Moates.Net products in bulk, or would like to be a reseller of our products, the following discount structure is available to you:

10% off for 10 – 19 pieces more of a given item
15% off for 20 – 49
20% off for 50 – 99 and
25% off for 100+ units

NOTE!
This discount can be applied retroactively as well for a 12 month rolling total. For instance, if you buy 5 units at regular price of $20 each and then later on purchase 6 more units in a 12 month period at $20 each, then a discount will be applied to the total so you’ll get a partial refund of 10% on all 11 units, or $22.

Furthermore, if you subsequently purchase 12 more units, you will be eligible for the 15% price break on all 23 units, giving you an additional $47 off. The total net discount on ALL same items purchased in a 12 month rolling period would effectively be 15%. We chose a 12 month rolling time period instead of a calendar year so you won’t lose your discount if you buy in December and then more in January.

This may seem confusing, and it does add to order processing complexity on our side. However, it is designed to lower the risk level for entry-level shops and resellers. You don’t need a big buy-in, since the retroactive discount structure takes care of you!

This discount structure is not valid for small incremental orders (one part here, one part there), and does not apply to individual drop shipments. Instead, it is limited to quantity orders of 3 or more pieces at a time going to the same destination. So if you buy 3 units and 8 units, then you get the 10% discount on all 11. If you then buy 1 separate unit separately, the 1 separate unit doesn’t get the discount and doesn’t count toward the total accumulation for bulk retroactive discount.The reason for this is that the 1 piece at a time approach still requires all of the administrative order processing burden on our side, and part of the reason for bulk discounts is that it is easier for us to ship quantities of units than shipping them individually.

Group buys:

Pre-arranged group buys are available. The same normal discount structure as described for bulk discounts applies based on the number of participants, but the minimum individual order quantity of 3 isn’t required.

Any purchase made on the website or over the phone under a group buy situation should be CLEARY INDICATED, preferably in the comments section of the order. That way we know what to do with it.

For example, one group buy coordinator will contact us ahead of time and initiate the group buy period (up to two weeks in duration). We will agree on the close-out date for the group purchase.

If the coordinator wants to have all of the units shipped to them and then distribute them to the individual purchasers, then it will be handled no differently than a standard bulk discount situation.

If the buyers decide to pay for the units individually at our webstore and have them shipped separately to each buyer, then that is also fine. In this case, full price will be charged initially. At the close of the group buy, a discount will be applied as a partial refund to each participant separately.

The total discount will depend on the total number of participants. So for 10-19 it’d be 10% and for 20-49 it’ll be 15%. We usually don’t know how many participants are involved until the close of the group buy period, so that’s why the partial refund / discount is delayed until that time.

Hope this helps!

Troubleshooting: BURN1/BURN2

The following is something which can be applied to anyone trying to troubleshoot a BURN1, BURN2, or APU1 with respect to chip programming. It is also useful to get the USB device drivers correctly configured.

It is unlikely that your chip or burner has failed, such events are actually quite rare. All devices are fully tested for all functionality prior to shipment.

We have many folks that send their units back to us, but very few that actually exhibit failure during bench testing once they arrive.

However, it is possible that something is wrong with your procedures.

Please utilize the following test matrix. This should take about 5 minutes:

1) Disconnect all USB devices, close all software, and re-install USB drivers.  See here.  If you suspect that your drivers may be confused, use the FTCLEAN procedure outlined here.

2) Re-connect the Moates device, and allow the drivers to associate with it. Wait about 30 seconds.

3a) Go into the Windows Device Manager, and look under ‘Ports(COM/LPT)’. If there is a ‘USB Serial Port’ listed, right-click on it and select ‘Properties’. If not, carry out step ’3b’ on this list first.

3b) If you saw the ‘USB Serial Port’ from step (3a) then go directly to Step 4. If not, then expand your ‘Universal Serial Bus controllers’ section, and right-click on the ‘USB Serial Converter’. Go to the ‘Advanced’ tab, and check the box indicated as ‘Load VCP’. Then hit ‘OK’, unplug the device, and plug it back in. You should then be able to carry out (3a) successfully.

4) Go to the ‘Port Settings’ tab and then click the ‘Advanced’ button. Change the COM port setting on the pull-down to COM4, COM5, or COM6, regardless of ‘in use’ warnings. Accept any warnings. If you are running multiple devices (for instance an Ostrich and BURN2), make sure you assign different COM port numbers to each of them. But, make sure your COM port assignments are in the range of COM4-COM8. Also, while you’re on this page, change your ‘Latency timer’ to 1mS via pulldown. Click OK to apply all settings and close all Windows Control Panel sub-windows. If you like, you can unplug and replug the USB cable to the device to verify that it appears in the list with the new settings.

5) Download and install the latest version of Flash-n-Burn from here:

http://tunerpro.net/download/SetupFlashBurn.exe

Note: If you’re working with an APU1, check the back and make sure the horizontal switches are placed in the ‘outboard’ position, away from the USB connection.

6) Download a 64k ‘test’ bin from here:
http://static.moates.net/zips/00-512-TEST.zip
Unzip it, and open the FlashBurn software.

7) Within the FlashBurn software, make sure the chip burner is recognized in the white dialog window. Select 27SF512 on the top left, and load the 64k ‘test’ file to the buffer. Make sure that the file size displayed in the dialog window is 65,536 bytes. If you’re loading a 32k file (like for Hondas etc), make sure the file size is 32,768 exactly.

8) The addressing should auto-select on the top right, but make sure it is correct. Chip addressing should be 000000-00FFFF. Buffer addressing should also be 000000-00FFFF. If you are loading a 32k file rather than the test file, make sure chip addressing is 008000-00FFFF and buffer addressing is 000000-007FFF.

9) Insert the chip into the socket, with the notch (pin 1) facing up toward the ZIF handle and USB cable. Make sure the chip is positioned furthest away from the handle and USB, such that the 4 empty slots are closest to the handle.

10) Select ‘erase chip’ and ‘blank check’. Verify that these steps were successful. Look up again at you addressing, and make sure it matches what is specified in step (8).

11) Select ‘program chip’ and then ‘verify chip’. Make sure you have success in the dialog box.

At this point, if everything checks out, you have illustrated that your chip and programmer are working correctly. If any of these steps fail, please send us a screen capture of the part of the process which failed, and we’ll do what we can to help you troubleshoot further.

Other problems can come from corrupt, incorrectly sized, or mismatched binaries for target application, incorrect chip and buffer addressing for a given file size, or incorrect COM port settings within the client software (such as Crome, etc).

For the burner itself, typical ‘next step’ troubleshooting would include taking apart the enclosure, blowing it out with compressed air to remove any metallic dust that might have accumulated, gently prying loose the ZIF socket to make sure there are no bent pins underneath where it snaps in, trying a different USB cable, trying a different chip, or trying a different PC or USB port.

Certainly if there is a true hardware failure, we’ll be glad to take care of it at no cost, but we doubt you want to spend time shipping back and forth if there isn’t a real hardware fault.

Theory: Modes of Operation

Introduction

What makes engine management tricky is that even the best theoretical models fail to accurately represent physical behavior in certain situations.  All engine controllers would use the same logic and procedures for running the engine 100% of the time if there was a perfect engine control strategy.  Instead, most engine management schemes incorporate several different modes of operation in which different sensors dictate fuel and timing requirements.  Also, engine controllers have specific logic dictating when to switch between different modes of operation based on different demands from the driver and different engine conditions.  Some of the most common mistakes made by people starting out (hell, even experienced tuners too) are changing some of the “main” functions in order to try to fix a problem that is being caused by a secondary table or the computer operating outside its normal mode(s).  Better understanding of the various modes of operation will help pinpoint what needs to be changed in a tune.

It would probably be a good idea for you to have read the other articles about Injectors, Speed-Density, Mass Air Flow, and Alpha-N before reading the rest of this.

Some basic vocabulary:

  • ECM, ECU, Engine computer : used interchangeably to mean the computer operating the fuel injectors and running the engine
  • RPM : Revolutions Per Minute – how fast the motor is spinning
  • MAP : Manifold Absolute Pressure – (usually) the pressure of air entering the motor
  • ECT : Engine Coolant Temperature sensor – sensor used to measure the temperature of coolant circulating through a motor.  Sometimes called different things by different manufacturers.  I will use ECT here
  • IAT : Intake Air Temperature sensor – sensor used to measure the temperature of air entering the motor.  Sometimes called different things by different manufacturers – I will use IAT here.
  • MAF : Usually used as a shorthand for Mass Air Flow Sensor / Meter
  • MAP : Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor – a sensor that measures the pressure of air in the intake manifold
  • Idle Valve : A electromechanical valve controlled by the ECM that allows air into the engine in order to control engine speed.
  • Displacement : the volume swept by a piston descending from the top to the bottom of the cylinder bore.  More here.
  • AFR : Air Fuel Ratio – the ratio of air to fuel present in a combustible mixture.  Usually stated as a ratio, i.e. 14.7:1 for the stoichiometric AFR for gasoline.  Stoichiometric AFR varies from fuel to fuel.
  • Lambda : similar to AFR, except usually expressed as a number where 1.0 represents a stoichiometric mixture for all fuels.  Lambda and AFR are the same concept expressed in different units.
  • Stoichiometric : a mixture containing the precise amount of oxidants required for complete combustion of all fuel present.  See here or here for more information on chemistry involved.
  • Injector : a special type of solenoid that allows fuel to flow through it when energized (more)
  • Pulsewidth : the length of time the engine computer applies electricity to the injector, or how long the injector is commanded to be open
  • Flow Rate : The amount of fuel an injector flows once open.  These values are typically given in units of cc/min or lbs/hr at a specified fuel pressure. (injector flow rate varies with the square root of fuel pressure.)
  • Latency : the length of time after the injector is turned on before it achieves its linear flow rate.

Goals of Engine Management

Although the answer is somewhat obvious (“make the engine run as well as it can”) it is worth a closer look at what engine management systems try to achieve and why.  Operating optimally normally means one of several things:

  1. Making the most power possible without engine damage happening
  2. Consuming as little fuel as possible in order to make a specific power output (maximizing efficiency)
  3. Minimizing emissions

Most of the time engine management systems aim for more than one of these at once, i.e. Fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions or power and efficiency.  Generally, you cannot have your cake and eat it too when it comes to engine management because the physical conditions required to achieve optimal fuel economy are vastly different than those required to achieve optimal power production.  Minimizing emissions frequently conflicts with BOTH power and economy!

So how do engine management systems deal with the conflicting requirements of economy, emissions and power?  The answer is the title of this section – engine management systems switch between different modes of operation based on input from the driver, measurements from sensors and how they are programmed from the factory.  Sometimes in the course of tuning it is necessary to change not only configuration parameters of an ECM but also how it switches from one mode of operation to another.

Common Modes of Operation

Different ECMs will have different modes of operation and different rules for switching among them.  Many modes of operation exist to service requirements common to all engines, leading to many modes of operation being shared between different engine management implementations:

  • Cranking: This is the first task for an ECM – help an engine transition from being spun by the starter to spinning on its own propelled by combustion.  This might not sound like a very difficult task, but there is a LOT involved!  While cranking, cam and crank sensors need to be monitored so the ECM can determine how fast the motor is spinning and what angle the crankshaft is at in order to provide accurate ignition timing, injectors have to be fired in order to deliver enough fuel to get the engine moving, the ignition system has to deliver sparks at an opportune time to ignite the mixture, (in some cases) the idle valve needs to be opened to allow enough air into the motor to get it running on its own…  And more sometimes!  Combine this with (typically) the lowest operating voltages because the alternator is not providing electrical energy and you have a potentially tricky situation.
  • Startup: Once the engine is spinning under its own power, the fun can start.  There are often special rules that change the behavior of the ECU immediately after the engine starts.  Idling higher to prevent stalling is a common task in startup mode.  Many engines add additional fuel and change timing in order to try to help the engine warm up to desired operating temperature faster.
  • Open Loop: This is a critical mode for the overall operation of the engine.  Open-loop mode is the mode used most often for performance, but it is important all the time.  Open loop operation uses a control strategy like MAF, Speed-Density or Alpha-N to determine fueling and ignition parameters to use to run the engine.  If tuning parameters related to open loop are incorrect, the motor will never run optimally.
  • Closed Loop: This is an important mode for fuel economy and emissions.  In Closed Loop mode, the fueling and ignition values from Open loop are adjusted using feedback from additional sensors (usually Oxygen sensors).  Small imperfections in a tune can be corrected in closed loop, letting the ECU maintain much closer control over operating conditions than is possible with open loop alone.  There are usually limits to how large changes can be made by closed loop, which can lead to diagnostic error codes.  (Too Lean / Too Rich / O2 sensor)
  • Power Enrichment: (aka “PE” mode) This is a subset of Open Loop operation where engine conditions such as AFR and ignition timing are adjusted with the goal of maximizing power.  Frequently, TPS readings close to wide open throttle serve as a trigger for PE mode.
  • Tip-in: Sudden changes are a problem for all control strategies.  When the TPS sensor indicates the throttle has changed quickly enough, the ECU can enter Tip-in mode where
  • Decel Fuel Cut Off (DFCO): When you take your foot off the gas, many ECMs will shut off fuel injectors in order to decrease fuel consumption and help promote engine braking.
  • Dashpot: Many ECUs implement some form of digital dashpot using the Idle Valve.  The idea here is to prevent stalling when the throttle plate closes suddenly by opening the idle valve enough to gradually bring the engine to idle.
  • Idle: At idle, the ECU tries to maintain engine speed while little or no load is placed on the engine.  Idle is often one of the trickiest states to control well.  Usually a mixture of airflow control (via Idle Valve or Drive-by-Wire), spark control and fuel control is used.  Strategies for controlling idle vary immensely among manufacturers.
  • Limiting/Protection: Engines have limits – how fast they can safely spin, how much boost they can handle, how fast the car can safely travel.  Part of the ECM’s job is to monitor engine conditions and take measures before damage occurs.  Frequently, spark or fuel will be cut off until engine conditions return below a pre-set limit.

More to come later on this topic…

Theory: Speed Density, pulsewidth variants

Introduction

Before you read this, you should already have read the articles on Injector Theory and Speed-Density.  This article will not make much sense without the background information in those articles.

First, vocabulary:

  • ECM, ECU, Engine computer : used interchangeably to mean the computer operating the fuel injectors and running the engine
  • RPM : Revolutions Per Minute – how fast the motor is spinning
  • MAP : Manifold Absolute Pressure – (usually) the pressure of air entering the motor
  • ECT : Engine Coolant Temperature sensor – sensor used to measure the temperature of coolant circulating through a motor.  Sometimes called different things by different manufacturers.  I will use ECT here
  • IAT : Intake Air Temperature sensor – sensor used to measure the temperature of air entering the motor.  Sometimes called different things by different manufacturers.  I will use IAT here.
  • Displacement : the volume swept by a piston descending from the top to the bottom of the cylinder bore.  More here.
  • AFR : Air Fuel Ratio – the ratio of air to fuel present in a combustible mixture.  Usually stated as a ratio, i.e. 14.7:1 for the stoichiometric AFR for gasoline.  Stoichiometric AFR varies from fuel to fuel.
  • Lambda : similar to AFR, except usually expressed as a number where 1.0 represents a stoichiometric mixture for all fuels.  Lambda and AFR are the same concept expressed in different units.
  • Stoichiometric : a mixture containing the precise amount of oxidants required for complete combustion of all fuel present.  See here or here for more information on chemistry involved.
  • Ideal Gas Law : PV= nRT (Pressure times Volume equals moles of gas times ideal gas constant times temperature)  More to be read about this here.
  • Moles : a measure of how many atoms are present.  See here.
  • Induction stoke :  the part of a 4-stroke engine’s cycle in which air is drawn into the cylinder by the piston.  See here for more information if you are not familiar with a 4 stroke engine’s operation.

Many ECMs (particularly older ones) use extremely slow processors to run an engine, especially by today’s standards.  In addition to doing all the math required by Speed-Density to calculate airflow, the processor often has many other extremely timing or IO-intensive tasks, such as processing crank and cam sensor inputs, firing spark plugs and firing injectors.  Additionally, most of these processors lacked floating-point units (short explanation: pieces of a chip that understand what fractions and decimals are) limiting their ability to accurately represent a model that involved lots of numbers with a fractional component.   Bottom line: engineers had to come up with ways to simplify and speed up the math involved in speed density in order to get older, slower, cheap microcontrollers to be able to run an engine.

Obviously, different manufacturers implement things differently.  In the remainder of this article, we are going to explore briefly how Honda and GM simplified the ideal speed density system to make it more practical to implement on cheap hardware.

GM: Base Pulse Width (BPW)

Ideally, n = PV /RT and then injector pulse = n / injector flow constant

GM introduce the concept of “Base Pulse Width” or BPW to reduce the “V” and “R” terms.  Basically, the BPW is how long the injectors need to be open in order to fill cylinders at 100% volumetric efficiency at a standardized temperature.  The BPW is then multiplied by the Volumetric Efficiency table (which is no longer a VE table in the ideal sense of the word) to determine fueling at different load and RPM conditions.  This is then modified further by coolant and intake air correction tables to account for temperature.  This cuts the number of math operations more or less in half.  The idea behind Speed-Density is being applied in a way that is less math-intensive.

Honda: Required Fuel Value (ReqFuel)

Ideally, n = PV /RT and then injector pulse = n / injector flow constant

Honda took a different approach to the problem of simplifying Speed-Density.  Basically, the MAP sensor and RPM values measured by the ECU are used to index a LUT that contains (more or less) a desired fueling value.  Looking at the math above, Honda essentially pulls the final desired injector pulse (n / injector flow constant) out of a table.  This required fueling value is then scaled by various tables indexed by ECT and IAT which attempt to correct for variations in air temperature.  Honda reduces about half a dozen math operations to one table lookup and a couple of additional easy math operations.  Again, the principles of Speed-Density are being applied in a non-ideal way that attempts to capture what is going on in a way that is fast to implement on slow chips.

Ford: Diesel Programming

Good news: Our hardware (Quarterhorse, F3, F8, F2A+F2E) works great on diesel trucks

Old Bad news: As of this time (2-25-10) there are NO PUBLIC DEFINITION FILES for software that supports our hardware. (TunerPro RT, EEC Editor, Binary Editor)

New Better news: (2-13-13)  The Minotaur software available from Power Hungry Performance will spit out bin files you can program to our chips.  Supposedly, there will be QuarterHorse support soon.  Note: we are not affiliated with PHP in any way and you will have to contact them for any and all specific information regarding their products.

Theory: Mass Air Flow

Introduction

Be prepared to do a lot of reading in the numerous side links on this page.  More information that is beyond the scope of this overview will be available.

“Mass Air Flow” (MAF, for short) is a method of measuring airflow into an engine in order to supply an appropriate amount of fuel and adequate spark timing. First, vocabulary:

  • ECM, ECU, Engine computer : used interchangeably to mean the computer operating the fuel injectors and running the engine
  • MAF : Usually used as a shorthand for Mass Air Flow Sensor / Meter
  • Vane Air Flow Meter (VAFM, “Flapper” type meter) : An early type of air meter rarely used today that relies on air pressing against a metering plate (“flapper”) to provide an airflow signal
  • Karman Vortex air meter : A type of air meter that not used very much anymore that creates and counts vortexes (air disturbances) in order to measure airflow.
  • Hot-Wire MAF : A type of MAF Meter that uses a thin wire heated by an electric current to directly measure air mass.  The most common type of MAF today
  • Hot Film MAF : A type of MAF Meter that uses a metal film heated by an electric current to directly measure air mass.  Another type of MAF that is found today.
  • TPS : Throttle Position Sensor
  • MAP : Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor – a sensor that measures the pressure of air in the intake manifold
  • Displacement : the volume swept by a piston descending from the top to the bottom of the cylinder bore. More here.
  • AFR : Air Fuel Ratio – the ratio of air to fuel present in a combustible mixture. Usually stated as a ratio, i.e. 14.7:1 for the stoichiometric AFR for gasoline. Stoichiometric AFR varies from fuel to fuel.
  • Lambda : similar to AFR, except usually expressed as a number where 1.0 represents a stoichiometric mixture for all fuels.  Lambda and AFR are the same concept expressed in different units.

Types of MAF Meters and General Operating Principles

Hot Wire MAFs and Hot Film MAFs are the dominant technology in use today.  Earlier style meters (Vane/Flapper, Karman) required an external temperature sensor in order to provide a meaningful airflow reading.  Hot Wire and Hot Film sensors are often found coupled with a dedicated air temperature sensor but they do not strictly require one because the method in which they generate a signal accounts for the temperature of the air they meter.  If you want to learn more about meters, read up here.

ECMs generally have a routine (usually called the “MAF transfer function” or something similar) that converts the raw sensor readings into an airflow value. Sometimes this is a real-world unit (such as g/s or lb/hr) and sometimes it is a purely arbitrary synthetic unit that merely defines the shape of the curve. MAF transfer functions for hotwire MAFs are usually an exponential curve. The shape of the curve is usually determined by the physical characteristics of the sensor. The metering range of the sensor is usually determined by the cross-sectional area of the housing it is in. This means that an easy way to increase the amount of air a given MAF can meter is to put it in a pipe with a larger cross-sectional area. The new MAF transfer function can be approximated (usually fairly closely) by multiplying the old transfer function by the difference in cross sectional area.

Example Question: a meter in a 2″ diameter round housing can meter 1000g/s. The same meter in a 4″ diameter round housing will measure how much air?

Answer: First, find cross-sectional area of 2″ diameter pipe.  Area of circle = pi * r^2.  Diameter = 2 * radius. Radius = 1″, area = 1 * pi.  Second, find cross-sectional area of 4″ diameter pipe.  Area = 4 * pi.  New area / Old area = 4 / 1 = 4.  Multiply original airflow (1000g/s) by ratio of area (4) to get maximum value of 4000g/s.  Note that each individual point in a MAF transfer function can be multiplied in this manner to rescale.

MAF Systems

From here on in this guide, “MAF” and “MAF Systems” will refer exclusively to systems using Hot Wire MAFs and Hot Film MAFs. The reason for this is pretty simple: these type of sensors (at least theoretically) are capable of measuring air mass without the need for significant compensation for air density (i.e. altitude changes, forced induction, changes in air temperature).  In practice, many control strategies use other sensors to try to increase the accuracy of the MAF by additional adjustments but it is not strictly necessary.  MAF sensors do not know what “boost” or “vacuum” are – they deal exclusively with airflow.  If you are trying to make the transition from tuning mostly Speed-Density systems to MAF Systems, be very cautious with timing values as the same trends and rules do not apply to both systems.

Fueling with a MAF system is about as simple as it can get.  It goes something like this:

  1. The raw sensor output is converted to an airlow value
  2. The next step after determining airflow is to figure out how much fuel is needed to achieve a “target” AFR (more on AFR targets later) which is usually achieved by multiplying by AFR expressed cleverly (see footnote)
  3. Finally, the desired fuel value is achieved by multiplying/dividing by a value (injector constant, injector slope, async BPW, …) to account for injector size.  Also any battery compensation is added.  (See Theory: An Injector Model for more information)
  4. Done!  At this point, we have an injector pulsewidth!  PulseOut = (MAF_Transfer(RawMAFSensor) * TargetLambda * injector size) + injector latency

There is no “standard” way of doing timing with a MAF system, but all variants basically calculate a value that represents how much air is entering the cylinder each time the motor turns over.  It goes something like this:

  1. Start with the same airflow value from step one of fueling. (MAF signal -> MAF Transfer)  This tells us the amount of airflow per unit time.
  2. Measure how fast the motor is spinning (RPM) and from this calculate how many revolutions happened during the same time frame as our MAF sample.
  3. Multiply/divide airflow by engine revolutions to get airflow / rev.  Most engine management stops here (GM, Subaru, Mitsufeces, …) and spark tables are indexed in grams/rev.  This is a measure of engine load (with a lowercase “l” to denote that we are talking about something different than “Load”, explained next)
  4. Ford (and others?) instead use a “Load” (with an uppercase “L” to denote that we are talking about something different than “load”) value that is calculated by multiply/dividing airflow/rev by engine displacement to get a measure of how full the cylinders are relative to their maximum capacity naturally aspirated at sea level with certain air conditions.  If you’re at all familiar with Speed-Density, this should sound somewhat familiar because it is a concept VERY similar to Volumetric Efficiency.
  5. Timing tables are usually in the form RPM x calculated load.  MAF timing tables will display a very different characteristic shape than RPM x MAP tables common in Speed-density systems.

Now that we have some concept of cylinder filling (“Load” or “load”), we should return to a piece of how fueling happens in a MAF system: target lambda/AFR.  Usually the same measure used to determine appropriate ignition timing is used to determine an appropriate target AFR/lambda.  In these cases, there is a table that dictates target lambda/AFR indexed by RPM and load.  Sometimes, RPM and TPS is used to determing target AFR instead of calculated load.

Strengths of Mass Air Flow

  1. Extremely accurate fueling and spark delivery across a diverse range of engine conditions (at least while in steady-states): the holy grail for engine management. A properly set-up MAF system can adapt to changes in weather and altitude with ease.
  2. Minor changes to engine equipment (i.e. headers, minor camshaft changes, intakes that do not significantly alter the placement of the MAF) do not require recalibration of the ECM.

Weaknesses of Mass Air Flow

MAF systems are known for having these issues:

  1. MAF systems are extremely intolerant of vacuum leaks.  Any leaks between MAF sensor and engine generally cause all manner of odd problems, running lean in most cases due to un-metered air making it into the engine.
  2. MAF sensors can be extremely sensitive to how they are “clocked” – merely rotating the sensor at a given spot in the intake tract can be sufficient to significantly change its output.
  3. MAF sensors require laminar flow to read 100% accurately.  True laminar fluids do not exist so this introduces some degree of inaccuracy to MAF sensor readings.  Placing MAF sensors near bends, size transitions or obstructions where flow is less laminar greatly magnifies this issue.
  4. A MAF sensor can be a flow restriction in cases where the MAF housing is the smallest portion of the intake system.
  5. Hot-wire MAF elements are very fragile.  Debris can destroy delicate wires easily.  Dirt and oil deposits can build up on the sensor element, adversely affecting readings.
  6. MAF systems have a relatively poor response to transient conditions, such as sudden throttle changes.  This is explained by the time it takes air to move from the MAF sensor where it is measured to the cylinder where it can be involved in combustion.
  7. MAF sensors are not “one-way” sensors – reversion from a camshaft with large amounts of overlap can cause air to be metered on its way in to the engine and then again on its way out resulting in an artificially high MAF reading.  This can almost always be fixed by placing the MAF sensor sufficiently far from the throttle body, however doing so comes at the expense of making transient response even worse.

It may seem like there are a lot of weaknesses of MAF systems, but it is truly hard to emphasize just how amazing and important the strengths are.  It is no secret that the majority of OEMs today are implementing MAF systems as the primary control strategy.  There is a good reason for this, namely that engines can be controlled much more precisely (with the goal of meeting stricter and stricter emissions standards) with a MAF system than any other type of control strategy.

Read the rest of this entry »

Theory: Speed-Density

Introduction

If you do not have a strong background in physics and chemistry, be prepared to do a lot of reading in the numerous side links on this page.  This isn’t intended to be a brutal presentation of the topic, but theoretical concepts are necessary in order to be able to understand what is going on behind the scenes.

Speed-Density is a method of estimating airflow into an engine in order to supply an appropriate amount of fuel and adequate spark timing.  First, vocabulary:

  • ECM, ECU, Engine computer : used interchangeably to mean the computer operating the fuel injectors and running the engine
  • RPM : Revolutions Per Minute – how fast the motor is spinning
  • MAP : Manifold Absolute Pressure – (usually) the pressure of air entering the motor
  • ECT : Engine Coolant Temperature sensor – sensor used to measure the temperature of coolant circulating through a motor.  Sometimes called different things by different manufacturers.  I will use ECT here
  • IAT : Intake Air Temperature sensor – sensor used to measure the temperature of air entering the motor.  Sometimes called different things by different manufacturers.  I will use IAT here.
  • Displacement : the volume swept by a piston descending from the top to the bottom of the cylinder bore.  More here.
  • AFR : Air Fuel Ratio – the ratio of air to fuel present in a combustible mixture.  Usually stated as a ratio, i.e. 14.7:1 for the stoichiometric AFR for gasoline.  Stoichiometric AFR varies from fuel to fuel.
  • Lambda : similar to AFR, except usually expressed as a number where 1.0 represents a stoichiometric mixture for all fuels.  Lambda and AFR are the same concept expressed in different units.
  • Stoichiometric : a mixture containing the precise amount of oxidants required for complete combustion of all fuel present.  See here or here for more information on chemistry involved.
  • Ideal Gas Law : PV= nRT (Pressure times Volume equals moles of gas times ideal gas constant times temperature)  More to be read about this here.
  • Moles : a measure of how many atoms are present.  See here.
  • Induction stoke :  the part of a 4-stroke engine’s cycle in which air is drawn into the cylinder by the piston.  See here for more information if you are not familiar with a 4 stroke engine’s operation.

Basic Goals and Method

The goal of Speed-Density is to accurately predict the amount of air ingested by an engine during the induction stroke. This information is then used to calculate how much fuel needs to be provided and may also be used for determining an appropriate amount of ignition advance.

The theoretical basis for this is the Ideal Gaw Law (more here.) rearranged to solve for “n” (the number of moles of gas present :

  • n = PV / RT

In order to use n = PV / RT to calculate the amount of air a motor ingests during the induction stroke we would need:

  • P is pressure in the cylinder immediately after the intake valves close.
  • V is volume, which we know from engine displacement.
  • R we know (it’s the Ideal Gas Constant see here for more)
  • T is the temperature of the gas in the cylinder immediately after the intake valves close.

Many of the things required to calculate the amount of air the engine ingests using the ideal gas law are missing, unavailable or at least incomplete.  Some notable points where reality is less than ideal:

  1. Our MAP sensor measures the pressure differential caused by the downward stroke of the piston in the intake manifold, not pressure in the cylinder as the intake valves initially close.
  2. We are assuming that there is no residual exhaust left in the chamber to contribute to “poisoning” of the intake charge.
  3. Camshaft overlap (i.e. when both intake an exhaust valve are open simultaneously – see here) makes fluid flow modeling considerably more complicated.
  4. T that we need is the temperature of the gas in the cylinder.  This is not usually MEASURED – instead it is ESTIMATED from the temperature of air in the manifold (IAT), the temperature of the cylinder heads (ECT) and other factors.  “RT” is often referred to as the “density correction term” as it tries to account for how air density varies with temperature.  Density correction is arguably one of the biggest problems with speed-density. (more on this later)

Speed-Density introduces the concept of Volumetric Efficiency (VE) to account for the differences between what it can observe and what is really going on.  (mostly problems 1-3 above)  Roughly speaking, VE is the ratio between the amount of air actually present in the cylinder and the amount of air we predict would be in the cylinder using MANIFOLD pressure (MAP) instead of cylinder pressure for our “P” Pressure term, REVOLUTIONS Per Minute (RPM) times Displacement (Volume / REVOLUTION) for our “V” term and an air temperature value estimated from some combination of ECT and IAT for our “T” term.

A motor said to be operating with 100% VE has the same amount of air actually in the cylinder as predicted by n = PV / RT.  Most engines operate at considerably less than 100% VE in most operating conditions.  The difference between actual airflow and theoretical maximum airflow is termed “pumping loss.”  Some engines (most notably Honda engines :) ) can achieve slightly greater than 100% VE in certain conditions.  Most engines operating under forced induction can be thought of to have a VE greater than 100% in some conditions.

Speed Density ECMs generally have one or more VOLUMETRIC EFFICIENCY (VE) tables that are a critical item to be adjusted.  These tables allow predicted airflow values to be more closely adjusted to observed reality.

Strengths of Speed-Density

Speed-Density has many things going for it:

  1. Pressure sensors do not pose any restriction to the flow of air into the engine, unlike a MAF sensor.
  2. MAP sensors respond to changing conditions very quickly, enabling it to have fairly good transient response especially compared to Mass-Air-Flow
  3. Compared to a carburetor, it allows much more control over the mixture at different engine loads
  4. Simplicity: all the sensors required are extremely reliable.

Weaknesses of Speed-Density

Speed-Density is known for having several notable issues:

  1. Density correction, density correction, density correction.  You might not think that temperature is that big of a deal, but trust me it is!  Seasonal changes can wreak havoc on speed-density systems.  Superchargers or turbochargers that compress air and raise its temperature from adiabatic heating cause significant changes in density that must be accounted for.  Altitude can also be really problematic.  Many systems incorporate Barometric Pressure sensors to try to address this, but it’s an imperfect correction.
  2. Large camshafts with extremely low vacuum due to high overlap close to idle.  Camshafts that have low or pulsing vacuum close to idle present a challenge for Speed-Density.  MAP sensor averaging can help.  Alpha-N blending can help.  It is still very tricky to use speed density to predict airflow with a pressure sensor with camshafts that do not build an appreciable amount of vacuum.
  3. Volumetric Efficiency tables can be very time consuming to tune.
  4. Engine modifications generally produce volumetric efficiency changes requiring re-tuning.
  5. Quite a lot of math is required to do Speed-Density “by the book.”  Because of this, most manufacturers implement something kind of like theoretical speed-density and cut corners or combine math operations in order to allow faster execution on puny computing hardware.  (Remember, most ECUs made prior to 2000 have a slower processor than the average inexpensive cellphone circa 2010)

Sanity Checking a Speed-Density Tune

There are a few rules that transcend particular manufacturer implementations:

  1. Volumetric efficiency rarely changes suddenly.  VE tables should almost always have very gradual changes.
  2. VE usually DECREASES as pressure DECREASES (i.e. more vacuum = less VE)
  3. VE usually maxes out at an RPM close to peak engine torque at maximum observed load, which is usually where peak cylinder filling occurs.
  4. Remember that VE tables are not the only thing that controls fueling.  Temperature correction tables (ECT, IAT) are often implemented as multiplier/divider tables.  Don’t forget about injector battery tables either! (see the separate article on Injector Tuning for more on this)

Theory: Alpha-N

This is going to be rather brief because Alpha-N is rarely used as the primary strategy for engine management today.  You should at least know what it is because it is often used as a “sanity check” for primary control strategies.

Alpha-N is also sometimes called “TPS maps” because the only sensor that is used for determination of fueling is the Throttle Position Sensor.  (And measured RPM, or how fast the motor is spinning)  Fuel and timing requirements for the engine are expressed as a function of RPM and TPS.

Alpha-N is used most of the time in tricky situations:

  1. When the MAP sensor or MAF sensor has failed and the primary control strategy is deemed to be invalid.  Something-is-better-than-nothing is the idea.  (“Load with Failed MAF” is an example from Ford-land)
  2. In conjunction with ITBs (Individual Throttle Bodies) due to the extremely low vacuum created by them (making Speed-Density tricky) and the desire to avoid needing to fit a potentially restrictive Mass Air Flow sensor (making MAF impossible).  Again, something-is-better-than-nothing is the idea.
  3. In conjunction with ITBs and MAP as a load multiplier. (PowerFC D-Jetro for GTR Skyline, most notable example)  ITBs + Boost – Alpha-N output is multiplied by a MAP sensor to come up with a composite load index.
  4. In conjuction with Speed-Density and some kind of blending algorithm.  This approach is often used with very large camshafts that pull little vacuum at idle.  Basically, TPS and MAP are allowed to contribute varying amounts to the overall load calculation.   Net result: more stable and meaningful load index close to idle when MAP sensor readings are unstable.  Found on the Electromotive TEC3 among others.

Alpha-N is very poor at dealing with hills (think about engine load going up and down hills at a constant throttle position), temperature variations and just about anything else that you’d care about except close to wide open throttle where it does fine.

Theory: An Injector Model

Introduction

Understanding your fuel injectors is one of the most important things you can do to ensure that fueling is appropriate for your engine.  First, some vocabulary:

  • ECM, ECU, Engine computer : used interchangeably to mean the computer operating the fuel injectors and running the engine
  • AFR, Air – Fuel Ratio : the ratio between how much air and how much fuel an engine is receiving or how “lean” or “rich” it is running
  • Solenoid : a solenoid is an electromagnetic electromechanical device.  It operates by using electricity moving through a coil to generate a magnetic field which moves a plunger. (more)
  • Injector : a special type of solenoid that allows fuel to flow through it when energized (more)
  • Pulsewidth : the length of time the engine computer applies electricity to the injector, or how long the injector is commanded to be open
  • Flow Rate : The amount of fuel an injector flows once open.  These values are typically given in units of cc/min or lbs/hr at a specified fuel pressure. (injector flow rate varies with the square root of fuel pressure.)
  • Latency : the length of time after the injector is turned on before it achieves its linear flow rate.

Everything you ever wanted to know about injectors but never knew to ask

Injectors are pretty simple devices: turn on the electricity, wait till the fuel starts flowing.  Right?

Not quite…

Injectors are mechanical devices – once electricity is applied, the injector needs to move from its resting position in which no fuel flows to its open position where fuel is flowing at its published flow rate.  The problem is that this transition from “closed” to “open” is far from instant – some larger injectors can take several milliseconds to open fully.  During this time, injectors do not flow at their linear flow rate.  How long injectors take to open varies from injector to injector largely due to mechanical reasons.  Fuel pressure can also affect injector latency because of the force applied by fuel on injector internals.  And most importantly, the amount of electricity you supply to the injector controls how much magnetic force coils inside the injector can create.  Bottom line: when your battery voltage decreases (such as when cranking) your injectors take longer to open and fuel injector latency increases.

Tuning for Injector latency

Most engine computers have some kind of table to compensate for injector latency.  They can be called many things – “Injector Battery tables” or “Injector battery offset” or “battery tables” but they frequently look very similar: a table of how long to open the injector before it achieves linear flow (“latency”) versus measured battery voltage.  The idea here is that the ECM opens the injectors for a period of time (from the battery tables) to compensate for variations in injector opening time versus battery voltage.  If you change injectors, you probably need to update your battery tables, too.  If you vary fuel pressure, you may want to try changing the battery tables as well as other tables to account for changes in latency.

A basic method for tuning injector latency requires a wideband and a multimeter (or better yet, datalogging battery voltage from the ECU).  Follow this procedure:

  1. Start by hooking up you multimeter or starting datalogging battery voltage.  If you are using a multimeter, use a voltage source close to the ECM if possible.
  2. Fire up the car and hold it at a few thousand RPM.  Observe battery voltage – it should be fairly high. (13.8 – 14.5 volts, depending on the vehicle)
  3. Gradually, let the car return to idle while keeping an eye on battery voltage.  Many vehicles will run anywhere from 0.75 to 0.1 volts lower at idle compared to cruising RPMs.
  4. Problems with battery tables can contribute to hunting or unstable idle.  Once the car is idling, do everything you can to put an electrical load on the car – turn on headlights, turn on the stereo, turn on the fan for the climate control inside the car.  As you do so, keep and eye on battery voltage and observed air fuel ratio.
  5. If you see the car run progressively leaner when you turn on electrical accessories and voltage drops, start increasing injector latency at the battery voltage you observe until you minimize changes in air fuel ratio when changing electrical load.  This will result in a curve with a steeper slope.
  6. If you see the car run progressively richer when you turn on electrical accessories and voltage drops, start decreasing injector latency at the battery voltage you observe until you minimize changes in air fuel ratio when changing electrical load.  This will result in a curve with a flatter slope.
  7. If you feel really adventurous, you can disconnect the large cable between the alternator and the + side of the battery (or sometimes a wiring distribution block) while the car is running.  When you do this, the battery will stop charging.  Voltage you observe at the ECU will decrease as the car consumes the battery’s charge.  You can generally tune a much wider range of the battery table by doing this but it is much more of a pain to do and will eventually drain your battery to the point the car will not run.
  8. Note: these injector battery tuning methods assume the car is reasonably well tuned close to idle and will idle at a reasonably steady AFR.  Doesn’t need to be perfect, but you may do more harm than good messing with injector battery tables when the tune is jacked.

Another sign that your battery tables may be off is when the car runs poorly at small throttle angles compared to large throttle angles.  Sometimes changing latency is a quick way to fix a car running too rich / too lean that runs well close to wide open throttle.  Latency changes will have a large effect at low pulsewidths (i.e. closed throttle) but will have comparatively little effect at high pulsewidths (i.e. open throttle.)

You shouldn’t be afraid to adjust injector latency as part of tuning but always remember that it is a BROAD SWEEPING CHANGE THAT WILL AFFECT HOW THE ENGINE RUNS EVERYWHERE.  If you have a problem in a specific load condition, chances are your problem is elsewhere.  When you start seeing PATTERNS of problems (i.e. closed throttle too lean, close to idle where battery voltage too lean, hard starts/cranking when battery voltage lowest, etc.) then it is worth looking into whether a latency adjustment can solve your tuning issue.

You can always sanity check your injector battery tables visually.  Injector latency always increases as battery voltage drops.  If you look at a 2D graph of battery voltage versus latency, it should always be relatively smooth.  As voltage increases, injector latency should level out and change much more slowly than at lower voltages.  This is not a Ford thing or a Honda thing – this is a universal thing that all cars that use fuel injectors will follow.

Tuning for Injector Flow

We haven’t said that much about injector flow up to this point, but it is equally important to having your engine run correctly.  Injector flow is the “obvious” thing that most people change when installing different injectors.  Most older systems account for injector flow with a “fuel constant” (it is called many different things in different systems such as… ) – when you change the size of injectors, you multiply the fuel constant by the difference in flow between your old injectors and your new injectors.  For example:

  1. Fuel constant = 16.4
  2. You have 24lb/hr stock injectors
  3. You install 32lb/hr stock injectors
  4. 24 (old) / 32 (new) = .75
  5. New fuel constant = old fuel constant * change in injector size = 16.4 * .75 = 12.3

Keep in mind, this is just a guideline to get you close.  You can use the injector size / injector constant to make sweeping, global changes to fueling if your tune is off everywhere.  You *should* be able to get a tune very close to where it was before an injector change by changing nothing more than battery tables and an injector size / injector constant.

Some systems (Ford, GM LSx, newer Dodge / DCX Hemi, others) use a dynamic flow model of injector behavior rather than a single “injector constant.” These systems try to more precisely account for the flow of injectors by modeling how injector flow changes as a function of how long they are open.  Most ~87-2009(ish) Ford uses the concept of injector slopes.  There is a “low slope” and an “high slope”, along with a threshold to change from one to the other and often a minimum pulsewidth.  The injector slopes can be thought of as TWO injector flow constants and the ECM changes from one to the other as the injector opens.  When changing injectors on Fords or other manufacturers that use dynamic flow models, a good starting point is to scale both slopes (or all members of a dynamic flow table) uniformly by the predicted difference in injector flow rate.  An even better approach is to copy values from another OEM calibration that uses the injectors you have installed.  Some injector suppliers (but not many – Injector Dynamics is the one that comes to mind) do dynamic flow testing and can supply you with data precise enough to plug in.

Moates.net Philosophy (READ ME)

Our Philosophy:

We are a small technically-oriented outfit that focuses on product development not fancy packaging, phone support, and marketing.  We bring you high-quality, value-priced products aimed at self-starters willing to read documentation, learn independently and most importantly try things on their own without someone providing guidance every step of the way.

About Moates.Net and our products:

It is important for you, our users, to understand what we expect of you and what we aim for in our products.  Our philosophy at Moates.Net is simple: we want to bring enthusiasts the highest quality products for tuning their cars at a reasonable price.  What we mean by “enthusiasts” is simple: people who are motivated to learn about tuning their car.  It doesn’t matter whether you’re working on your own car or work for a shop – if you’re willing to learn about tuning a car, you are part of our target audience.

Our objective isn’t to make a fortune – there are plenty of companies out there that sell comparable products for a whole lot more.  With that said, there are trade offs in our approach.  Our products frequently do not even have boxes, let alone fancy packaging like other vendors.  Our products do not ship with much printed instructions – instead our documentation can be found online.  (Like this support site!)  We devote most of our resources to product development, leaving limited resources for intensive support.  We have chosen instead to provide inexpensive products with fewer frills aimed at a more educated user.

What We Expect of You

Here at Moates.Net, education and teaching are things we value highly.   We don’t expect everyone to be born knowing how to tune a car or use our products.  We expect anyone who purchases our products to be willing to READ and learn independently. We will help you if you run into trouble, but we expect you to READ documentation and try to do it on your own first.  We base a lot of the technical documentation and guides we develop on the questions that you ask.  (If you have any suggestions for additional guide topics, we are always willing to listen.)  Many of our activities, such as this support site and our YouTube channel with its video tutorials, are aimed at providing resources to further educate our users.

If it doesn’t work out…

Worst case, we have a no questions asked money back guarantee for any parts returned in the condition they were received.  (We can’t issue a full refund for items damaged through neglect, negligence or abuse.)  We hope this isn’t how things end, but you’re only out the cost of shipping and the time you spent trying to figure it out.

GM: TPI Forced Induction

Good Choices (simple)

You have three choices for tuning forced induction on a TPI ECM (i.e. 7730).

  1. Not REALLY a good option, but a simple one: use stock code, hack it around to be ok at WOT by power enrichment tables.  This is ugly and only has a possibility of working for low boost setups.   Do not do this unless you really don’t care how the car runs except at WOT and you are too lazy to choose another option.
  2. Use Code59 on your ’7730  (see www.code59.org – a modified version of the $58 code that came in the Syclone/Typhoon turbocharged trucks) For this to work, some wiring mods are needed.  (See here for more wiring info, here for more general info) This is not for the faint of heart, but represents a much better solution overall because you are using code that understands what forced induction is.  Code59 isn’t perfect, but it’s arguably the best option readily available that works with OEM hardware.
  3. Code59 on a ’749 ECM.  This is pretty similar to #2 above, except you get some additional stuff in the ’749 that will make it easier to say run P+H injectors.  Rewiring will be needed.  The ’749 is also setup to control boost via PWM and an external solenoid which can be handy for turbocharged applications.

You should plan on buying a Wideband O2 (such as the Innovate LC1), something to datalog with (APU1, ALDU1) and something for realtime emulation (APU1, Ostrich2) along with a G1 chip adapter in order to tackle a project like this and have any degree of success.  You could do it without some of these tools, but you probably wouldn’t be reading this webpage for advice if you didn’t need them.

You will genererally need to install colder spark plugs, (maybe) a spark box, larger injectors (32, 36 or 42lbs would probably be good place to start.  Use an injector calculator to figure out how big you should go based on power goals), a 2bar or 3bar MAP sensor to replace your 1bar factory sensor, sometimes an upgraded fuel pump(s).

Good Choices (Complicated)

The other worthwhile option to mention is using a LS1/LS2 ECM with EFI live.  This requires extensive hardware and wiring changes but has great rewards in terms of an upgraded ignition system, more reliable triggering (i.e. no Optispark) and much more powerful and capable ECMs with advanced features.  See EFI Connection 24x / 58x pages for more information on this upgrade.  You can get EFI Live from us after you’re done.

Bad Choices

While I’m at it, a lot of people ask about FMUs.  This is a quick explanation of how they work and why they’re a band-aid (at best) not an effective tuning solution:

  • FMU is a rising rate regulator
  • It causes fuel pressure to increase at a fixed ratio with boost pressure (usually 8:1 to 12:1)
  • Fuel delivery (approximately) increases by the difference in sqrt of fuel pressure.  I.e. 40 -> 60 psi = sqrt(60) / sqrt(40)
  • An FMU can generally get fueling approximately ok SOMETIMES but more often than not it results in an overly rich mixture and inconsistent fueling across different RPMs.
  • With 35 psi base pressure and 8psi of boost, a 8:1FMU will be delivering close to 100psi of fuel pressure!  Because it raises fuel pressure so much, there is a significant strain placed on the fuel pump and injectors.  Fuel atomization (and therefore power) suffers a lot at extreme pressures with most injectors.
  • Most importantly, FMUs do nothing to adjust spark to compensate for boost.
  • Bottom line: FMUs are a cheap, hackish bandaid supplied to minimally make things work by running the car artificially rich instead of properly adjusting the mixture and timing for boost.

The “Good Choices” above are ways of doing things the “right” way.  It’s a lot more work, but you can get the car to run a *lot* better than with an FMU.  Making appropriate adjustments for ignition timing will also let you run a LOT higher boost than with just a FMU.

Nissan 20×2 Boards

Versions

This is the documentation for the Nissan Boards.  At this point, there are only one version of the boards, 1.1nm  As future revisions to the board are produced, this page will be updated.

Applications

These boards are designed for S13 and B13 applications.  They will NOT work with S14a ECUs that have a 20×2 pin header.  They will not work with late S14/N14/etc. ECUs that have a 40×1 header. Known good applications:

S13 Silvia RWD “Red top” SR20DET (i.e. 62, E5, etc.) 240 swaps, etc.

S13 Silvia RWD “Black top” SR20DET NON VVTI (VVTI motors not supported) 240SX, etc.

S13 240SX KA24DE twin cam engine US Engine

B13 Sentra FWD SR20DE Sentra, etc.

U13 Bluebird SR20DET

About the Board Hardware

The 20×2 Nissan ROM board has two 28 pin sockets for an EPROM such as a 27SF512 or 27C256.  These are not “even-odd” style boards – chips installed in this board should always have identical programs unless you REALLY know what you are doing.  You will need to buy a ROM burner separately if you do not already have one – this board cannot program chips.

You can use two Ostriches with this board.  Insert each Ostrich like it was an EPROM.  Make sure JROM is not installed (see below for more) or you may have issues with addressing and Ostriches.  You will need a 5.x version of TunerPro RT to have native dual Ostrich support.  You can accomplish the same thing using TunerPro 4.x by also using EmUtility (available from tunerpro.net in the utilities section) to run one Ostrich in emulation mode while TunerPro natively runs the other Ostrich.

Switching and JROM

As previously mentioned, the 20×2 board allows the use of two programs with near instantaneous realtime switching.  The JROM is used to change between two programs when using 512k chips (i.e. 27SF512 or 27C512).  By default, the adapter uses a 32k program from 08000h to 0FFFFh.  When JROM is present, the adapter uses the 32k program from 00000h to 07FFFh.  You can mount an external switch for the jumper if you like.  This link has more information about programming multiple programs and offsets.

Software support

This board has no copy protection that would prevent you using it with a particular software package.  The technical answer to “software support” is to say that it will work with any software capable or providing a Nissan binary ROM file.  Software I have tested these boards with:

  • Tuner Pro RT ( www.tunerpro.net )
  • 925style.com ROM Editor ( ask google “925style ROM editor” – original site is down)
  • Nistune

Just to reiterate – any software that can output a binary file will probably work fine with these boards.

Installation

Installation of the Nissan 20×2 boards can be quite tricky.  A proper de-soldering iron is required for good results.

  1. Remove both the top and bottom case from the ECU
  2. De-solder all 40 pins of the 20×2 connector.  remember, a clean de-soldering job is critical to this working correctly.  Be careful not to overheat and burn any traces as this can be easy to do.  When you are done, it should look something like this:
  3. Place the installed pin header in the 20×2 header so that the “notch” in the header faces towards the blue ECU connector:
  4. Solder the 20×2 header in place carefully.  Again, remember clean, accurate soldering is critical for this product to work correctly:
  5. Find the jumper marked “CJ1″  – you will need to remove it and move it to position “CJ2″  as this enables the use of the ROM board.  (Putting the jumper back to CJ1 will enable the use of the stock program.)  Be careful when doing this.  The use of two soldering irons, a soldering iron and de-soldering iron or best yet – a set of SMD tweezers will make things much easier.  If you damage the jumper removing it, do not worry – you can use a small piece of wire or a paperclip instead.  (Trim any excess wire / paperclip if you use this method)
  6. Finally, slide the 20×2 board onto the installed header:

Binary Editor 2010 and EEC Analyzer Registration

Binary Editor 2010

In order to issue you a license for Binary Editor, you must first download and install the software. ( http://www.eecanalyzer.net )  Once you have downloaded and installed the software, go to the “Register” menu at the top of the screen and select “Register Binary Editor”

Next, you will be presented with a screen where you need to provide some information.  First, check the boxes to indicate which hardware you will be using.  Under “Tuners,” check “Moates” for the QuarterHorse.  If you have an Innovate or PLX wideband, make sure you check the appropriate box under “Loggers.”  You will also need to do this for the DataQ standalone datalogger, if you own one.  Finally, put your name in the “Licensed To:” box.  Finally, copy and paste the Machine Code displayed and email it to support@moates.net so we can issue you your license.

Note: you will see the machine code  change as you check and uncheck boxes along with changing the name in the “Licensed To:” box.  You must have the same boxes checked and your name typed identically as when you requested your license before you type in the registration key or your “Machine Code” will be different and the registration process will fail!

After you have received an email with your registration key, you will need to open the software registration box again, make sure the same boxes are checked, re-input your name in the “Licensed To:” box so everything matches.  Enter the registration key in the boxes below and then click “Register” – and you’re done!

EEC Analyzer

Download and install the software from http://www.eecanalyzer.net

Go to the “About” tab and click “Register”

Copy and paste the “Machine Code” into an email to support@moates.net

When you receive your registration code, navigate back to this screen and enter it in the bottom box then click “Ok.”  Your software will now be registered.

GM 94-95: Reflash or not?

94 and 95 were also kind of odd years for GM computers as they transitioned toward OBD2.

There are several groups of ECMs.

94-95 LT1,LT4,LTx: These can be tuned via TunerCATS ( link ) with the $EE definition and an ALDU1+CABL1 (94 – square ALDL style connector) or ALDU1+CABL2 (95 “D” shape OBD2 connector).  These are typically the 16188051 ECM.  APU1 also works for reflash on these vehicles.  No chip adapter needed.

94-95 TBI: Unlike all other TBI ECMs (which use a G2 chip adapter) these ECMs are memcal like their TPI cousins and work with the G1 memcal adapter.  Take the cover off the ECM and if you see a memcal, you probably have one of these.  The 16168625 is an example.

94-95 W-body LQ1: uses the regular MEMCAL found in 1227165/7727/7730 ECMs, you can use the G1 adapter in these units also.

94-95 3800: Primarily use the 16183247 and subsequently a different style memcal is used than earlier ECMs.   The 94-95 3800 powered regals use a similar ECM that is weatherproofed, the 16183428, but that ECM is specific to the 94-95 3800 Regals only. This family of PCMs have the little blue ‘box’ memcal that has the integrated knock sensing board.   A G4 chip adapter is required for these, it’s shorter than the G1.

93-95 3100 vehicles (except for the A-bodies, which use a non-weatherproof version of the 94-95 LQ1 PCM) are all flash units. Unfortunately we don’t currently have a solution for these.

(Thanks to Robert Saar for his help!)

GM 96-97: The “odd” years

Lately, we have been getting a lot of questions from people with 96-97 GM vehicles looking for a tuning solution.  Unfortunately, these are transitional years where the electronics are incompatible with either the earlier and later computers that are well supported.

There are a few solutions for people with 96-97 computers:

-Convert to a 94-95 ECM that is well-supported by TunerCATS OBD1.  This will require an ALDU1+CABL2 combo, TunerCATS OBD1 tuner ($69.95) with a single definition file ($EE – $19.95) OR TunerCats WinFLash and TunerPro RT with the $EE definition, along with a new 94-95 ECM.  This may involve minor wiring changes.  Arguably the most simple and straightforward option.  Preserves all engine sensors, distributor, etc.  This option will work for LTx engines ONLY.  96-97 Vortecs must use another option.

-Convert to a 98+ ECM that is well-supported by EFI Live.  This will involve more substantial wiring changes and a supported 98+ ECM.  This will involve a 24x reluctor conversion kit. (See here for more information.)  This is *NOT EASY OR SIMPLE* but arguably provides the best solution because quality, trusted LSx electronics replace many problematic parts on the earlier engines such as replacing  the Optispark system with coil-near-plug as found on the LSx.

-Use TunerCATS OBD2 Tuner.  Even though there are no hardware changes needed for this, I put it towards the bottom of the list.  TunerCATS OBD2 Tuner is only available with Roadrunner ECM hardware because of licensing restrictions BUT Roadrunner hardware isn’t compatible with 96-97 ECMs.  You will end up having to spend $489 on a RoadRunner guts kit (that you can’t use on a 96-97 ECM!), $280 on the  TunerCat RTOBD2 package, and $80 on a definition for your ECM.  Grand total: $850.  Now go back and compare costs to the two conversion options above if you wonder why I didn’t list this option first…

Ostrich ROM stacking

So you want to use your Ostrich 2.0 with one of our switching adapters? ( Two Timer, G2X, G3 )

This guide gives you an idea of how to “stack” your ROMs to make things work.

Step 1: determine how big ONE program is. ( look how big your ROM is – 27C256 = 32kbyte = 8000h, 27C32 = 4kb = 1000h )

Step 2: Determine how big of a program your switcher uses.  This hopefully will be the same as the size of your ROM, but your ROM may be smaller than this value.  G2X = 4kb = 1000h, Two Timer = G3 = 32k = 8000h)

Step 3: Fire up Emutility

Step 4: Uncheck the “End justify” box

Step 5: Input the size of your program in the SIZE box.

Step 6: Do some math.  Programs in the Ostrich are END JUSTIFIED.  The Ostrich’s memory goes from 00000h to 3FFFFh.  Fire up the windows calculator in scientific mode.  Change the format to hex.  Put it 3FFFF to start.

Step 7: Subtract the size of your PROGRAM.  This can be different from the size of the switching adapter.

Step 8: Put this value in the start address box.

Step 9: Program the ostrich (Write from file to emulator)

Step 10: Go back to Windows calculator.  Subtract the size of the SWITCHING ADAPTER.  (3FFFF – size of program – size of switching adapter)

Step 11: Go back to step 8.  Repeat steps 8 through 11 until you have programmed all desired settings.

GM 86-95 OBD1 Guide (READ ME)

(eventually this page will have more information)

Basics

When we talk about “OBD1″ GM vehicles, we mean vehicles made from (approximately) 1986 to 1995.  These cars used several different types of engine controller – some have one injector for each cylinder (Tuned Port Injection, or TPI along with the LTx motors) while some have fewer injectors that are placed near the throttle body (Throttle Body Injection, or TBI) instead.  All the vehicles of this generation speak the ALDL protocol for logging/vehicle communication.

For purposes of this guide, “ECM” means Engine Control Module, Powertrain Control Module (PCM), Engine Computer Module (ECM) – terms will be used interchangeably to mean the same thing.

Hardware for OBD1 GM

Overview

94-95 model years are oddballs.  Many of these ECMs support being reflashed over the ALDL interface (e.g. LT1) using TunerCATS.  Some (like the 94-95 TBIs) use a G1 adapter.  Many Grand Prix from these years use the G4 adapter.  Diesels generally use the G5 adapter.

The process for tuning OBD1 GM products is pretty much the same for all 86-93 model years.  First, a “chip adapter” is used to convert whatever the ECM in question needs into a form that accepts a 28 pin EPROM.  Some chip adapters require soldering for installation (G2, G2X) but most do not (G1, G3, G4, G5).  The same EPROMs can be used for all of our OBD1 GM products (except the switching adapters…) which is usually the 27SF512 – C2.

After a chip adapter has been installed in an ECM, tuning can begin.  You can burn chips using a ROM burner such as the BURN1/2.  Alternatively, you can either use the Ostrich 2.0 emulator or the emulation facilities of the APU1 to make changes while the vehicle is running.

Logging from the computer is accomplished using either an ALDU1 or the logging facilities of an APU1.  For 86-94 vehicles, CABL1 is required to connect the logger and the vehicle.  For the 1995 model year, CABL2 is required due to the physically different connector.

Instead of buying the BURN2, Ostrich2 and ALDU1 separately, you can buy the APU1 unit that does the functions of all three pieces in one unit.

Hardware

G1 – “Memcal” style chip adapter (TPI, Syclone/Typhoon, 94-95 TBI, 92-93 LT1, etc.)

G2 – “TBI” 24 pin style chip adapter

G2 GN Style – Grand National Only.

G2X – Multiple program switching version of G2

G3 – Multiple program switching version of G1

G4 – Blue Memcal style chip adapter for some 94-95 vehicles

G5 – Diesel memcal style chip adapter

HDR1 – Header that allows reading memcals in a BURN1/2.  Used to read stock program on memcal ECMs.

BURN2 – Programs chips

Ostrich – USB Chip emulator, allows realtime changes while engine running

Socket Booster – required for use of Ostrich 2.0 in TBI applications.  Can be used instead of G2 adapter.

ALDU1- USB ALDL interface

CABL1- Used to connect an ALDU1 or APU1 and a pre-1995

CABL2 – Used to connect an ALDU1 or APU1 and a 1995 car

APU1 – Combines the functions of the BURN2 (programming chips), Ostrich 2.0 (real time chip emulation) and the ALDU1 in one unit

Applications

This table is abbreviated. If you don’t see your application here, please email us.

Vehicle Identification
Chip Burning
Adapters
Emulation
All-in-One
Datalogging
Year & Model
ECM/PCM Part #
86-89 Firebird, Trans Am, Camaro, Corvette TPI
1227165
X
X
X
X
-
-
X
X
X
X
-
90-92 Firebird, Trans Am, Camaro, Corvette TPI
1227730
X
X
X
X
-
-
X
X
X
X
-
86-93 TBI
1227747 | 1228747
X
X
-
-
X
-
X*
X
X
X
-
94-95 Corvette, Impala LT1
16181333 | 16188051
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
X
X
X ’94
X ’95
92-93 Corvette LT1
16159278
X
X
X
X
-
-
X
X
X
X
-
86-87 Buick Turbo, 89 Turbo Trans Am
1227148
X
X
-
-
-
X
X
X
X
X
-
91-93 Syclone/Typhoon
1227749
X
X
X
X
-
-
X
X
X
X
-

* Socket Booster (S_BOOSTER) required for Ostrich 2 emulation and TBI ECMs

If you have excel, you can also take a look at this spreadsheet for a list of what hardware you’ll need with various combinations.

Software

TunerPro RT ( link ) and TunerCATS ( link ) are the two most commonly used software packages for OBD1 GM.

FreeScan is a free datalogger that works with some GM vehicles. ( link )

There is an excellent cross-reference I found with google that lists common ECMs, which mask (software revision) they use and various other useful information.  ( link )

Holden Vehicles

TunerCat OBD1 tuner seems to have the best support for Holden vehicles at this time ( link ) although TunerPro has support for some ( link )

Hardware-wise, the majority of these vehicles use the G1 chip adapter.  Some of the newer vehicles use our newest G6 chip adapter.  We don’t know the Australian vehicles as well as those stateside so we recommend you check out http://www.delcohacking.net for more info on these vehicles.

GM 98+ OBD2 Guide (READ ME)

(eventually this page will have more information)

The main product that we make for 98+ GM vehicles is the RoadRunner emulator that allows realtime changes to be made to a LS1 ECM.

The RoadRunner is designed to be used with either EFI Live or TunerCATS software.

EFI Live is a comprehensive tuning software package that includes both an editor and logging application.  The software has the most comprehensive vehicle support out of any package we sell for OBD2 GM, working with both Gen3 and Gen4 ECMs and TCMs.  It is licensed on a per-vehicle or per ECM type basis.

Tuner CATS OBD2 tuner is used primarily with the RoadRunner hardware.  It only supports Gen3 LS1 ECMs/TCMs.  Tuner CATS OBD2 tuner can ONLY BE SOLD WITH ROADRUNNER HARDWARE.  WE CANNOT SELL IT TO YOU UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES UNLESS YOU BUY ROADRUNNER HARDWARE.  It is licensed on a per ECM type basis.